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Hunting coyotes sounds like a real challenge and a good reason to buy a .220 Swift I want anyway, but I have a question. What d

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  • Hunting coyotes sounds like a real challenge and a good reason to buy a .220 Swift I want anyway, but I have a question. What d

    Hunting coyotes sounds like a real challenge and a good reason to buy a .220 Swift I want anyway, but I have a question. What do you do with the darned things? Do you sell your hides? I don't need to hunt them for population control, and I don't want to shoot anything just to leave it on the ground.

  • #2
    I'm sure they're edible, though i doubt i'd eat one. I'd tan the hide and keep it at camp, or on my trophy wall. I'd shoot one particularly because they are competition, eating the game i hunt, deer and turkeys. I'm sure this may not be a valid reason for some, but it's enough for me.

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    • #3
      I'd try contacting Fin and Fur Mag., they'll probably be able to tell you where to sell.
      Hope this helps, Good luck and Good hunting,oh congrats on the "new" rifle.

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      • #4
        Carry the hides to a taxidermist. They will be more than happy to take them off your hands.

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        • #5
          If you shoot the coyotes you can one of two things: 1 you could sell the hides to a collecter or you could decorate you house with them.

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          • #6
            I'm sure to draw negative feedback for this, but here I go-

            I'm not trying to tell anyone what to do, just offering up my point of view.

            The thought of killing something solely for the sake of killing it has never sat well with me. Coyote hunting seems like fun, but I have avoided it for that reason.

            I haven't heard of anyone eating them. (though I might try it) Last I checked the fur market was completely dried up. There was a while where places around here would take hides, but they wouldn't pay for them. Now most places around here won't even take them. They say they aren't worth the amount of money it costs to tan them.

            I guess if you want to pay to have them tanned and then hang them in your house that's one thing. But if you take it up as a hobby you're going to run out of wall space pretty fast.

            As for the idea of "predator control", this notion was thrown out the widow by scientists almost a century ago. Predators lead to more healthy game herds, not less.

            Again, you can do whatever you want, I'm just offering up my opinion since "the armchair outfitter" asked for it.

            let the negative feedback flow!

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            • #7
              Hey ken, I understand and respect your oppinion, and I'm shure majority of the users do as well.

              That being said, I hunt Coyotes. I have tanned my own hides several times but it is a pain. Usually I just give them to a tannery near my house that takes them for free.
              I have made several euro type skull mounts that I think look pretty cool and decorate my farm house with them.
              As for the Boddies- I drag them around behind my ATV and shoot hogs( sometimes other dogs) off them.

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              • #8
                P.S, The 220 swift is my favorite round for varmits and the small deer we have here in my area of texas. Great Choice!!!

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                • #9
                  Ken,
                  I was expecting your scientific approach, and I respect it. That said, there is already a predator(if not several) working the area i hunt,...ME. that is why i will shoot the coyotes on sight.

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                  • #10
                    Ken, no harassment from me but when you've had a small dog taken from out under your nose by a coyote your attitude kinda changes.

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                    • #11
                      Jim-

                      I don't own small dogs, so I've never had that experience. However, I'll do you one better.

                      One of our barn cats had a litter of kittens. They were a couple of weeks old, just big enough to go stumbling around the barn yard by themselves. I am feeding the horses when I heard my then-girlfriend scream bloody murder from around the corner.

                      A coyote was eating one of the kittens, and she had scared it off mid-attack. The weeks old kitten was laying on the ground with its abdomen torn open and its intestines laying on the ground next to it. It was crying and trying to limp back to its mother. I had to run down to the house and get the .22 to put it out of its misery. Shooting a crying kitten in the back of the head is no fun at all, trust me.

                      That being said, I'm not mad at the coyote in the slightest bit. It wasn't eating the kitten because it is evil. It was doing exactly what nature meant for it to do. Granted, its violent, and unpleasant, but getting upset at a predator for eating is no more logical that being mad a fish for drinking your water or at a tree for blocking the sun. Its what they do.

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                      • #12
                        I sell the ones I get to some local fur buyers.

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                        • #13
                          Steve-

                          I know we've been over this many times, so I'll make it quick.

                          The fact that we kill game animals does not make us predators, in a ecological sense. Predators take the weakest prey, we usually take the strongest.

                          Predators populations and their kill rates are regulated by the predator-prey cycles, hunting is regulated by no such cycle.

                          Also, predators hunt all year round, we only hunt in prescribed seasons.

                          ... just to name a few.

                          Hunting has a place in healthy ecosystems. It accomplishes many things, but replacing predators isn't one of them. This is not even a slightly controversial view in science, like I said, It was accepted the better part of a century ago.

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                          • #14
                            I sell the hides!

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                            • #15
                              I sell the hides!

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