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When calling coyotes in the woods how should you stay in one spot and how often do u call?

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  • When calling coyotes in the woods how should you stay in one spot and how often do u call?

    When calling coyotes in the woods how should you stay in one spot and how often do u call?

  • #2
    I wouldn't stay in one spot for more than 10 minuets. Unless it's a trail or there is a water source nearby or on the edge of a field. Call about every 5 minuets that should be more than enough. I am not the most experienced yote hunter so I could be missing something.

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    • #3
      i usually stay in one spot aroun 15 mins and call about evry three to five. sometimes i stay up to 30 if im trying to get bobcat as well.

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      • #4
        I usually stay around 20 minutes, I mix up the calling durations and time between, from a minute to every 3 minutes. I like to use a quieter rodent squeaker in between my calling.

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        • #5
          I STAY IN ONE SPOT CALLING FOR ABOUT 45 MIN. BECSUSE THOUGH THEY USELY COME RUSHING TO U PRETTY QUICKLY SOMETIMES I BELEVE WHEN THEY ARE PRESSUED OR SOMTHING THEY COME MORE CAUTIOUSLY TO YOU

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          • #6
            15-30minutes.

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            • #7
              15-30minutes.

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              • #8
                think about it, if your call is a wounded small game animal like mine is, do you think injured small game really does any moving? its a very stationary call, also, small game distress calls are very rare, so portraying that there are more than one wounded will sometimes spook the smarter ones.

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                • #9
                  I might be different than most but I usually sit quietly at the calling spot for about 20 minutes before calling. I think that coyotes hear me moving to the hunting spot and they will be shy of returning to the location where they heard me. After 20 minutes they settle down and forget they ever heard me. I also try to get up in a tree if I can. They will try to use the wind on their approach and will smell me much better if I am on the ground. Once I start to call, they usually seem to come within a minute or two. They are usually on the dead run until they get close enough to survey the location. I usually only blow a rabbit call 30 seconds or less. If nothing shows up after a minute, I will give it another 15 seconds. I have found that they can remember the location of the sound without you having to blow the call again. If they are scoping you out from cover and you blow the call again... they will locate it right in your mouth and disappear before you see them. Just remember that you are dealing with one of the smartest animals on our continent and you have to keep that in mind. Don't move after you blow the call. I like to have two people on the set so we can survey 360 degrees around us without moving. If they don't smell you and you don't move... you might be surprised how close you can get them. You don't have to be this cautious if you are in the open where your shot will be 300 yards, but if you aren't sure and they could get as close as 50-100 yards before you see them, it is best to be cautious. I have also had some of the wildest experiences hunting at night... around 2:00 AM with a full moon on fresh snow (where legal). You can see like daylight but they come in with reckless abandon at this time of day... they are not looking for humans at ALL. I once was calling from the ground at that time and one came from down wind and put his nose on the end of my rifle barrel to check it out. Funny... my glasses had fogged over just as he closed in so I couldn't see a thing. I heard my brother shout "SHOOT THAT SOB!" when he couldn't take it any more... he was watching over his shoulder and couldn't believe that I wasn't shooting. I reached up and pulled my glasses off. By the time I got my rifle up, he was about 150 yards away going through the brush... got away scott free. If nothing comes in within 10-15 minutes, I move on to the next spot at least a mile or two away. I think that most coyotes coming to the call are coming from at least a mile away. That distance is nothing to them as long as they can hear the call and they seem to be able to hear from a long way. I have seen them coming from over two miles away at times.

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                  • #10
                    Agreed with idahooutdoors answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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