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would i do much good seting a live trap around a river. i dont realy know what kind of animals are around

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  • would i do much good seting a live trap around a river. i dont realy know what kind of animals are around

    would i do much good seting a live trap around a river. i dont realy know what kind of animals are around

  • #2
    you will probably catch a coon or possum or maybe a bobcat if its big enough..but highly unlikely..but you out get into trapping that river..with legholds..if your interested just ask me on one of my questions and i will tell you all you need to know about catching coon beaver otter muskrat and wat ever you want..its a very fun sport..try it for me and if you hava kid take them they would love it

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    • #3
      I'm not sure it's ethical to trap if you have no idea what you intend to trap, barring a survival situation, which this clearly isn't. Do a little more scouting

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      • #4
        On a good traveled trail alon a water way you should have good success.Wit a live trap you can use logs andguide sticks to divert animals inside.Baits vary from commericial to a can of sardines which are deadly for possum and coon.A coyote is usually caught in a snare or large leg hold traps be caught in a large traps.Get some snares and learn to use them they will catch anything and are a hoot to use.I like using snares and deadfall traps.Learn to build a bird trap a live bird on a string is the best for a wily Bobcat.Good luck on your endeaviors in the field.

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        • #5
          On the river that goes through my deer woods I found deer, racoon, coyote, and one bob cat track.

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          • #6
            If you are trapping for Beaver, I have some suggestions: To force the beaver to enter, move logs
            and other objects along either side of the trap..
            Be sure to do this out several feet and at least
            5, preferably 10 on each side..This will insure
            that any beaver which encounter the trap will
            readily "funnel" inside and not try to take some
            kind of "detour"..If set right, the objects placed
            on each side of the trap will force the beaver to
            enter since it will see no other clear passage.. Double door traps will allow the beaver to see through
            the trap so they don't perceive it as a hazard..
            Be sure to cover the bottom of the trap with
            dirt, wood chips, vegetation or other natural
            material so they are not able to feel the metal
            mesh..This insures they will readily walk over
            the trap bottom without suspicion!!!

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            • #7
              have ya thought about settingout there yourself for a time to observe? heck use a camera too! have fun.

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              • #8
                Are you just trying to harass the wildlife or do you have a purpose for catching them? Why not do some scouting or bait an area for a trail cam and let the critters alone unless you have a purpose other than your amusement.

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                • #9
                  you would probably get something but i have to agree with some of these guys that you should do some more scouting of the area

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                  • #10
                    beaver, muskrat and any critter going for a drink

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                    • #11
                      Rivers, river shores and banks are probably the most prolific areas for wildlife. You will find just about every type of animal in your area coming to the river and animals like mink, muskrat, beaver and otters call it home. It is pretty easy to catch these with bait but I'm not sure why you would use a live trap unless you are trying to relocate animals. Check your local game laws before catching, transporting or releasing wild game.

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