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Pig Hunting - Guns and Loads

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  • #31
    There's only two times I've been concerned about a charge. The first was about 20 years ago and hunting pigs with a 10/22 loaded with CCI minimag HP's. I wanted to see how well it would do and aimed at the boar's head from 25 yards. It squealed and ran off, leaving only a couple drops of blood.

    The second was also about 20 years ago and a misplaced arrow hit a large pig in the gut. I was hunting from the ground and it was almost too dark to see. The pig ran across my back trail and stopped, apparently smelling me but not seeing me standing there in the poor light, wearing full camo. I didn't have another arrow knocked and was hesitant to make any move to give my position away. If charged, my plan was to whack it with the bow and draw my long knife for a tussle. But after a few seconds, the pig grunted and ran off. I later found part of the arrow broken off but never recovered the animal.
    Last edited by PigHunter; 05-27-2021, 10:42 AM.

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    • #32
      The guy hunting pigs in Turkey that was cut by a running pig was not really charged. He was in heavy brush and the pig just ran by him. He did shoot it with a 12ga but it did not stop the pig. I got him cleaned up and to the Hospital and he still got a nasty infection in his leg and spent about a week in the Hospital.
      Rifle hunters were stationed in more open areas (I had a -06), shotguns in brushy areas. We almost always got a pig or two using beaters to drive them.
      Last edited by jhjimbo; 05-27-2021, 10:50 AM.

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      • #33
        I'll repeat my previous observations.

        "Pigs is tough, but they ain't bulletproof!"

        If you're charged by a lion, the inference is, "I'm coming to get YOU!"
        If your charged by a pig, about 98% of the time, he's saying, "You're standing in my escape route!"

        You injure/wound a pig and press in on them, sure they will respond.
        He's hurt.
        But the same thing happens with an elk, moose, deer, etc, etc.
        We hear about game animals killing ignorant/unlucky hunters every year. The animal isn't dead and E. Fudd rushes in to claim his animal and gets a very rude surprise!
        D'Man, no offense dude, but feral hogs, regardless of size, are no more "dangerous" than any other cornered American game animal


        You want a nasty, chew your a$$ up game animal, try on the southwest's little "collared peccary"! They will round up their buddies, tree you and hold you hostage! Just for skits and giggles.

        For the .44 Mag. If it left a wound channel, it didn't ricochet.
        Sounds like poor shot placement.
        ....and no, a running feral pig DOES NOT present the optimal target. You gotta take what you can get!
        I killed a tusker of about 150 pounds, standing on the other side of a plum thicket probably 15 yards away. All I could see was enough of his outline to correctly select "shoulder"! How in tarnation that .30-30 slug got through that morass as accurately as it did, I'll never know. But it did!

        In the wild, feral sows average about 90-120 pounds.
        Boars a bit larger. Say +/- 150 pounds.
        Are there larger specimens?
        Hell yes! I've observed boars that probably pushed the 300 pound mark. Looked like he was dragging a sack with two bowling balls behind him!
        Most of the larger ferals have distinct "Russian" traits and they tend to be a bit more aggressive.
        But for the most part, they just want to be left alone!

        A couple of years ago. A home health worker was attacked and killed by pigs in a patients yard just outside Houston, TX.
        Since no one heard or saw the attack, it can only be presumed that she stumbled into a sow with piglets.
        Que sera, sera!

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Amflyer View Post

          Sounds like a Jean-Claude VanDammit movie, doesn't it?
          I had never thought of it that way before, but it really does.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Ernie View Post
            My biggest pig: Combo kill.
            Synchronized shooting at night (Spot and Stalk)...
            That's what I'm talking about Ernie... a real Russian boar! That one is probably 200 pounds or more. Once they reach that size and get even bigger, they can be dangerous. Check the "shield" on his chest. I doubt the .243 bullet would penetrate it from head on. Of course, when he is standing still you can shoot him in the ear. When they are charging at 45 mph, you don't often get such great shot selection. You are braver than I, my friend. After my big boar experiences, I no longer stalk on foot with a light pistol (e.g. 44 Mag). Of course your .308 should work in most cases. It is still risky because they often don't give you a second shot and they know how to use those cutters remarkably well.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
              ... I may switch my load for the 6.5 Creedmoor from the Hornady 143gr ELDX factory loads to the Barnes 120gr TTSX handload. Have you any experience with those bullets in the 6.5 CM on pigs?
              I have not tried them on a hog PH but would not hesitate to use them. I have found that the 6.5mm bullet has exceptional penetrating power in its own right and the Barnes bullets will penetrate well. The added shock of the higher velocity bullet could be a virtue too. My choice for big boar hunting with the 6.5 Creed would be the 147g ELD-X. That is a load and should penetrate like a 12 gauge slug.

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              • #37
                The Hornady 147 grain ELD-M works great on deer and pigs

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
                  That's what I'm talking about Ernie... a real Russian boar! That one is probably 200 pounds or more. Once they reach that size and get even bigger, they can be dangerous. Check the "shield" on his chest. I doubt the .243 bullet would penetrate it from head on. Of course, when he is standing still you can shoot him in the ear. When they are charging at 45 mph, you don't often get such great shot selection. You are braver than I, my friend. After my big boar experiences, I no longer stalk on foot with a light pistol (e.g. 44 Mag). Of course your .308 should work in most cases. It is still risky because they often don't give you a second shot and they know how to use those cutters remarkably well.
                  He was almost completely broadside, moving to our left, and slightly away from us.
                  I was shooting the 308. My buddy has taken a lot of hogs of all sizes with both his shorty 243 and his 308. These were his rifles we used. A-Max's in both guns.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Ernie View Post

                    He was almost completely broadside, moving to our left, and slightly away from us.
                    I was shooting the 308. My buddy has taken a lot of hogs of all sizes with both his shorty 243 and his 308. These were his rifles we used. A-Max's in both guns.
                    I always wanted to perform a test on one of these big Russian boars. If you get another, you might try it. Try shooting a .243 into the dead hog's shield from the front. See if one of these .243 bullets will penetrate the shield. I suspect it will not penetrate the shield. The .357 hot load is the only bullet I have witnessed and it was stopped cold. It was stuck in the hide with about 1/8" of penetration. The professional guide said that was common and that he had seen it stop a 130g .270 bullet. I believe him but have not witnessed it for myself.

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                    • #40
                      I do not do that much hog hunting.
                      The last hog I shot, was at night again, and the distance was less than 200 yards it was actually probably a little bit less than that, and I was intentionally going for a headshot, but it wasn’t straight on. And it was again with a 308 Winchester.
                      Hornady TAP 168’s.
                      it took me forever to get a shot, because the sucker would not stop moving.

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                      • #41
                        I'll try some experiments if ever given the chance. Just have never seen one that big in my area. So far, the only bullet failure I've had is a 180gr Nosler B-tip from my M1 Garand. From the trail, the wound was to the right shoulder and blood was dripping from the nose. My guess is the expansion was excessive and only one lung was hit. Lost the trail after 4-5 hundred yards and never recovered the animal.

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                        • #42
                          I know the old timers on this site have heard this story before but for those who believe the linked story hook, line and sinker, I will tell it again.

                          One of my most vivid hunting memories was of a hog hunt in South Georgia. We were in a six wheeler travelling a fire trail in deep forest, swampy conditions with 4 foot palmetto fronds covering the ground all around us. We heard a deafening roar that sounded just like a lion and instantly spotted about a 350 pound Russian boar standing on a rise 200 yards back in the timber. The boar was baring his tusks and roaring like a lion. It was my fellow hunter’s 12 year old son’s turn to shoot. His first hog hunt.


                          We instantly jumped out of the six wheeler and grabbed our guns. The boy had the 12 gauge with slugs; his dad had a .357 Mag pistol and I had a 44 Mag pistol. We all advanced about 15 steps toward the hog when the hog attacked with no other provocation. We couldn’t see the hog but the palmetto fronds jumped all the way like someone was driving a Volkswagen toward us at about 40 mph. I was on the left with his dad on the right, backing him up. I told the boy to get his gun up and track the hog with his safety off and ready to fire. I told him to hold his ground for the shot and don’t ever turn to run. I tracked his charge in my sights slightly ahead of the jumping palmetto fronds but never saw the hog itself. When the hog was about 50 yards away, his dad turned and ran. I couldn’t believe a guy would do that to his son but I kept my sights on the advancing hog.

                          The boy was remarkable. He stayed firm and kept tracking the hog too. I had my finger on the trigger and was about to shoot at 10 yards but I still did not see the hog. At that point, I heard the boom of the shotgun and the hog became visible to me as it slid all the way into the boy. I continued tracking it and almost shot at five yards but by the time I could see my target in the palmettos, it was apparent that the hog was completely dead and just sliding in.

                          The slug hit the boar just below the chin and penetrated almost the length of the hog, rendering him instantly dead and slowing his charge significantly. I must commend the young man for his courage and accuracy. That’s the way you have to be in that situation and he could not have done better. I had just met these two on this hunt but I would sure like to run across that young man again one day to re-live that moment. I have no doubt that it will be etched in his memory for the rest of his life. I wish someone had videoed that encounter because it would be a very popular youtube video I’m sure. That was as bad as it gets hog hunting and maybe it would help convince others to be a little more cautious in hunting these animals.

                          They don’t all do this but in that 3-day hunt, 3 similar boars out of the 7 we got did the same thing.

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                          • #43
                            I've killed one with a 12 gauge. It was a relatively small pig and I gut shot it on the run. It got back up and started going again! My second shot holed the heart and it dropped in its tracks. Lesson learned, a gut shot pig will keep moving at least for a short time, even if you've just punched a big hole.

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                            Another big bore experience: Hunting in a swampy area, a pig spooked and started running away across a shallow body of water. I fired with my single-shot .45-70 and must have clipped the spine. It dropped but then got back up, dragging itself toward the opposite bank, just using its front legs. A second shot put it down for good and I waded out to retrieve. Lesson learned - the .45-70 isn't the hammer of Thor some think it is and shot placement still remains king.

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                            • #44
                              "... shot placement still remains king. ..."

                              Whether it's a rogue elephant or an enraged bull mouse! 👍

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                              • #45
                                This^^^^^^^^^^^

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