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Rifle cleaning kit for primitive wilderness living

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  • Rifle cleaning kit for primitive wilderness living

    I have the Remington 700 5R .308 bolt action and Ruger 10/22 Takedown rifles. My goal is to put together a cleaning kit specific to each rifle that is near indestructible (tough materials and chemicals which are not affected by extremes of weather, dirt, little or no maintenance/cleaning, etc) and compact to fit into a full size backpack. Most likely cleaning will have to be done in the field.

    Some other goals are these kits would not require proprietary materials/fittings that are hard to get if times get tough in society, so ideally the kits I am looking for will be compatible with other competitors products to ensure availability is maximized no matter where you live.

    I plan on buying branded products if possible, don't mind paying more as my experience is you get what you pay for when it comes to quality, durability, etc.

    Primary use of two rifles mentioned are to put meat on the table if food supply in USA runs seriously short, so it is critical that all components of rifle cleaning system be able to last at least 10 years without maintenance or wearing out, and vital that all components are tough enough that they won't break off inside the rifle, or shred pieces off that get stuck in the rifle's insides where it might not be possible to extract this stuff in a primitive wilderness grid down situation. That could mean the end of your ability to eat, especially as a gunsmith will be hard to find in such a scenario.

    Since a full length one piece cleaning rod I am guessing won't fit completely inside a full size backpack, I think I am limited to either a snake or a multi section screw-together cleaning rod, both of which I've read generally have more issues in terms of durability, maximum cleaning ability, etc. If there are other better solutions I'd like to know. I'm particularly concerned about snakes, they seem like the best solution in terms of compactness for a backpack and ease of use with minimum components, but I've read several articles about snakes that broke inside the rifle barrel and were very difficult or impossible to remove without the help of a gunsmith--in other words, in a grid down situation your rifle might be rendered permanently useless, a dire situation if you are getting your food from it.

  • #2
    It's hard to beat the military surplus kits. They are rugged and compact. Add a 30 cal brush, brass muzzle protector, cleaning oil, lube, and patches.

    Amazon.com : GLORYFIRE Universal Gun Cleaning Kit Hunting Rifle Handgun Shot Gun Cleaning Kit for All Guns with Case Travel Size Portable Metal Brushes : Sports & Outdoors

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    • #3
      Are you allowed to have solvents on hand, in this scenario?
      I would move to a bolt action 22lr for longevity and less problems with functioning in less than desirable conditions.
      Last edited by Ernie; 12-09-2020, 12:41 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ernie View Post
        Are you allowed to have solvents on hand, in this scenario?
        I would move to a bolt action 22lr for longevity and less problems with functioning in less than desirable conditions.
        Good point. I've got a Ruger American Rimfire Compact with suppressor. It's quieter than an air rifle.

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        • #5
          How tall is your back-pack?

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          • #6
            Have you ever packed in on a frame pack for a 5-7 day hunt in the mountains?
            I suggest you do this, and you are going to learn what is essential and what is not.
            If this went on for 10 years, you will have to have a place to stash gear, food, etc.
            If not, you will have a large frame pack, with more weight than you really want.
            Ammo alone will weigh quite a bit if you are carrying everything all of the time.
            Plus, if this happened, you would need allies, as no one can survive that long alone, if desperation comes into play
            Clean water source for an extended period of time will be a big issue.
            You may not have time to boil water every time, and filters have to be replaced.
            Chop both barrels to 16.5" long,
            For hunting, you could easily go all 10 years without ever needing to clean that 308 Winchester.
            Electrical tape to put over your muzzle when hunting.
            What optic do you plan to use?

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            • #7
              Uhhmmm... I'm not sure there is any cleaning appliance with that degree of longevity.
              Those little (Outers? If they still make them!) screw together brass rods with the proper brushes would be my choice.
              They're light enough you could carry 3 or 4 easily. As one becomes damaged or worn out, replace it with a piece from another set.
              As for a cleaning chemical, hot soapy water is hard to beat. Just enough to scrub the bore.
              I would also consider the black powder standby, "Bore Butter" as not only a lube, but as a protectant to.

              I agree with Ernie. In a "survivalist" situation, I would suggest a bolt or single shot rifle. The simpler the action, the longer it will last.

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              • #8
                I would suggest learning how to make bows and arrows from primitive materials. Because that where we are headed if it all goes to pot. If I wanted something that would put meat on the table and not need lots of maintenance I would be looking at an ak-47. Ask the afgans how long they hold up in a tough environment. It’s ugly it not going to win any long range competitions but it will work for a very long time with little to no maintenance.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by clemente View Post
                  I have the Remington 700 5R .308 bolt action and Ruger 10/22 Takedown rifles. My goal is to put together a cleaning kit specific to each rifle that is near indestructible (tough materials and chemicals which are not affected by extremes of weather, dirt, little or no maintenance/cleaning, etc) and compact to fit into a full size backpack.
                  Your posts have caused a lot of questions to pop into my head

                  Have you shot your rifle yet?
                  If so, how many rounds down the barrel so far?
                  At what distance?
                  Group sizes?
                  Ammo (bullet brand and weight) used?
                  What kind of field rest did you use to shoot your Remmy 308 Win?
                  Who zeroed your scope and at what distance?
                  Have you hunted with it yet?
                  Have you hunted any big game before?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ernie View Post
                    Your posts have caused a lot of questions to pop into my head

                    Have you shot your rifle yet?
                    If so, how many rounds down the barrel so far?
                    At what distance?
                    Group sizes?
                    Ammo (bullet brand and weight) used?
                    What kind of field rest did you use to shoot your Remmy 308 Win?
                    Who zeroed your scope and at what distance?
                    Have you hunted with it yet?
                    Have you hunted any big game before?
                    I was wondering the same things.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I had an occasion in the NY Adirondacks where I needed cleaning. Coming down a relatively steep section toward a logging road I was grabbing small trees and when I almost got to the road the last tree let loose. Down I went and could not keep the muzzle of my .300 Weatherby out of the dirt. Luckily I had the military surplus .30cal cleaning brush with me. It is a brush with the pull cord wrapped around it. The cord has a weight on the end. I cleared as much dirt as I could and then pulled the brush through about 3 times - job done.
                      If I were to buy I would look at the Otis flexible that wraps in a circle-looks very compact.
                      I agree with Erine, you could go 10 years without cleaning if careful with the shooting. Keep muzzle covered.
                      BTW, I don.t think you can survive without getting some vegetables, so study up on what you can eat in the wild and take vitamins. P.S. It is a long winter. Jim

                      P.S. You will either need see through scope rings and have iron sights on the rifle or have a way to get the scope off and have iron sights.
                      Last edited by jhjimbo; 12-09-2020, 01:45 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Like Jimbo mentioned...Stuff Happens!
                        I have each of these. Important tool when dealing with extremes and moisture.
                        Oil and oil like substances are not always your friend, especially in your bolt body or trigger.
                        A small tin of anti-seize would last over ten years, but important for the back of the recoil lugs (only the back!).
                        After a good clean, it only takes a little on the back of the lugs, then when you close the bolt the first (Empty Chamber), make sure you push the bolt straightforward. You will feel a little give after you touch. With that same pressure that caused it to go a bit further, now move your bolt down. This helps the anti-seize spread uniformly, instead of being scrapped off by simply closing the bolt.
                        https://www.sinclairintl.com/gun-par...prod35019.aspx
                        http://pacifictoolandgauge.com/remin...oval-tool.html

                        For long term care check these two products: https://www.hollandguns.com/
                        https://www.hollandguns.com/32m7/par...intenance.html
                        Chamber lug and raceway tool
                        And even though, this will not be a problem for you-Witches Brew is great for dealing with carbon!
                        FYI-I killed a Springbok at 1/4 of mile, shooting off of that termite mound😎

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It's a total unrealistic fantasy to think you can survive long term on you're own. Especially with only what you can carry on your back. It's like thinking about what you would do if you could travel in time. Just stick to reading about such in fantasy / sci-fi books.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
                            It's a total unrealistic fantasy to think you can survive long term on you're own. Especially with only what you can carry on your back. It's like thinking about what you would do if you could travel in time. Just stick to reading about such in fantasy / sci-fi books.
                            Did you read about the ancient hunter they found frozen in the snow on top of the mountain in the alps ? He had his fire coal wrapped in a special leaf so he could carry it. Bow and arrows and hatchet. They think he was attacked by another hunter. A further search found in his pocket he had a BigMac and Fries.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

                              Did you read about the ancient hunter they found frozen in the snow on top of the mountain in the alps ? He had his fire coal wrapped in a special leaf so he could carry it. Bow and arrows and hatchet. They think he was attacked by another hunter. A further search found in his pocket he had a BigMac and Fries.
                              Ba, ba, ba...ba, ba..Loving It!

                              Comment

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