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  • Copper bullets

    So I’m sure it’s been asked already, but I haven’t found the answer I was looking for. With the newer solid copper bullets that are being made theses days, do they make the 270 any better for elk? Do they do a better job than say nosler partitions? I’ve been curious about and have been reading up more and more about a future elk hunting trip. Didn’t know if I should keep shooting the 270 or start looking for a “more suited” rifle.

  • #2
    I've never hunted Elk, but I've used solid copper bullets on deer and pigs. In 25 years, I've never lost an animal shot with them. I say stick with your .270 unless you're just looking for an excuse to get a new rifle

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    • #3
      I started using Barnes ttxs with my 25-06 it likes the Barnes vortex ammo. And I can tell you the two deer I harvested last year with it went down hard and fast. I shot a buck about 50 yards destroyed both shoulders complete pass thru. He ran about 40 yards with no front legs. I’ve not elk hunted myself but I would feel comfortable taking my .270 with Barnes. Hope it helps.

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      • #4
        This is good stuff to hear. I do enjoy the 270, but any time you can come up with an excuse to buy a new rifle, you should run with it. Have y’all had any kind of accuracy issues with the copper projectiles?

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        • #5
          The onlty thing that I have shot with the Triple Shock Barnes bullets was a nice 10 point buck. Hit on butt of shoulder and went clear through. No blood or hair found the buck about 130 yards away after scouring the brush for an hour. That was with a 25-06 and 85 grain Triple Shocks. I got rid of the gun and the Barnes bullets I had and went back to my Nosler Accubonds in my 308 and my 300WSM. I have had excellent results with the Nosler Accubonds. If you shoot one on the butt of the shoulder with the Accubonds like I did with the triple shock he will run like hell for a half of step straight down.

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          • #6
            I don’t know about better, but when I asked Dave Petzal about using my .270 and 130gr Barnes factory TTSX loads for elk he replied something to the effect that it was a deadly combo for them.

            Go forth and slay one.

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            • #7
              More good stuff. I’ve wondered what a tougher bullet would do to a deer. I’ve thought they may be a tad over constructed.

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              • #8
                I am a little in the dark concerning the questions regarding which high powered rifles are best for elk ! Damn, if a stick with a sharp broad head will put a elk down, and I have done it with seven with a recurve, what is the problem ? Dead is dead ! Any rifle that will put a bullet thru both lungs is as good as any arrow.......!!

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                • #9
                  I've been shooting a .270 Win sd since about 1973.
                  I've taken lots of whitetails, 1 antelope and 1 mule deer with it.
                  My "go-to" for my pet load is a Sierra 130gr BTSP.
                  I loaded some 160gr Nosler Partitions.

                  I had some "Partitions" left over from a Colorado trip.
                  Killed exactly ONE (1) deer with that bullet.
                  Whitetails are too lightly boned.
                  The Partition is too heavily built for whitetails. They won't open up quickly enough.
                  I haven't used those "monolithic" copper bullets.
                  I'm certain those (mono) bullets have a niche, but unless you're hunting those big Northern or Canadian white tails or maybe mulies, a simple soft point works just fine.

                  The .270 Win and elk.
                  Is it big enough?
                  Yes! Without a doubt!
                  My advice would be very picky about your shots and use at least a 150 grain bullet.
                  The monolithic bullets will probably encourage deeper penetration.

                  Good luck!
                  Good hunting!

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                  • #10
                    I use 100 grain tipped Barnes the tip help promote expansion. And it works. And as far as accuracy i get 3/4 inch groups with mine. It maybe able to do a better with a better shooter. I’ve had no blood trail with soft point bullets so it just works out that way sometimes. I like the idea of two holes in anything i shoot. I use them and don’t worry about the rest. I have a chance of running into hogs where I hunt so I want a bullet that will do the trick on them also.

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                    • #11
                      Long answer coming up.....

                      I first used copper before I was handloading, not sure of the brand, they acted like the corelokts I was used to, double lung, run a bit, fall down. I was worried about lead, because we're gut eaters here, and my kids were young. Then I learned about different forms of lead etc, and was no longer concerned.

                      First box of Noslers was a bad batch, most of the damage was on the outside of the ribs, though I did find a piece that had gone all the way to the other side. No visible entry in rib cage. Next shot front shoulder, ran up missed brain stem, 4th shot brain stem. Thought I might have to beat it to death, out of amo.

                      So I went back to Barnes. I shoot 180s out of an 06.

                      The bullet doubles in size immediately, so there's a 60 caliber entry hole, and it doesn't blow fragments inside, so it's a 60 caliber exit too. I really like the double lung, because an elk can run forever with a single lung. Sometimes they just stand there with a double lung then fall down after 20 seconds or so, sometimes they run like the dickens for 100 yards then fall down, but they do fall down. I've seen where people have busted through the front shoulder, then lungs, then exit ribs busting ribs on the way out.

                      I shot a quartering towards that went in front of ribs out the very rear of ribs, 2 feet of elk. The stupidest shot (and I've done plenty, figure I'll work my way through all the mistakes and do things right next life) stupidest shot was very quartering towards. Not wanting to waste a half pound of burger meat I placed it just behind the front leg, but the thing was at such a steep angle the bullet passed all the way through the body cavity, broke the rear leg just below the hip and lodged in a ham. Not sure how many feet of elk, five at least and plenty of power to turn a rear leg bone into chunks.

                      So ya, I like Barnes.

                      Shoot what you have, save your money for freezer paper and cling wrap. I would say shoot as heavy a bullet as is reasonable, just my opinion. I know lots of people shoot heavy for caliber. Don't know too many shoot over 200 yards, though I read about it in magazines. People shoot 243s too but I think that's a touch small, 270s can shoot a 150 without slowing down much.

                      Elk are tough, just saying. All the above descriptions are on elk, don't remember deer as well, if I were a better hunter I'd get a big muley, but I always settle for the first one I see. Mule deer run away shot in the heart, but they aren't as momentous as elk. I use the same ammo on everything.

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                      • #12
                        What are different kinds of lead ? You eat the guts ?
                        The early copper(?) might have been Herters. Actually bullets like CoreLokt are gilding metal and I am sure it varies in hardness from Company to Company.
                        I always used CoreLokts and they performed good. Never had a partition have a problem. I use Partitions in everything, even have some 170's flat nose Partitions for the 30-30.
                        My Elk rifle is a Mk V Weatherby in .340Wby. I have a variety of 250gr. All I need is to get drawn.

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                        • #13
                          I have to say that I’m not a personal fan of the .270 Win. However, with good bullets it is certainly capable of killing elk. The only monometal bullet I have used is Barnes TTSX and TSX, the latter before the TTSX came out. I have never lost an animal shot with either and no elk has taken more than a couple of steps before expiration. The last four I have killed pretty much went down in their tracks. I have never tried E-Tips, Trophy Copper, or Hornady GMX bullets, but I have to guess they work. The .300 Weatherby is my personal choice for elk with a 7mm Weatherby as a backup and mule deer gun. Your mileage may vary. Happy Trails

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                          • #14
                            I am pretty much of a non-believer in the words ‘elk are tuff’ ! Put a hole through both lungs and they will die as quick as any other game animal. Any animal not hit correctly is ‘tuff’ to put down. I have shot 8 elk with a recurve, harvested 7 of them. The one I lost was shot at a steep downhill position, was above the entrance lung but did hit the exit lung. I watched that elk for 15 minutes from the exit side of the arrow and saw the blood in the perfect position, but that is not enough to put any animal on the ground ! When I returned an hour later, found where the elk had bedded, but no blood from there on. If an arrow through both lungs can kill an elk, so can any big game bullet, just hit them right to begin with !

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                            • #15
                              Like I said before I didn't have very good results with Barnes Triple Shocks. This year I loaded 165 grain Hornady SST's in my 300WSM. I shot an 8 point this morning and Hornady's advertising that they "create huge wound channals" is spot on advertising. They recommend them for elk and I wouldn't hestitate using them on elk.

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