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Anal Concerns when Field Dressing

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  • #16
    I was in my early 30's when I started learning about deer hunting and field dressing. Matt you're right, they always mentioned cutting totally around the anus and some suggested tying off. So, for the first years I did as suggested, even used the Butt-Out device for a season.

    These days I don't worry about it. My main reason for field dressing is to reduce the drag weight and to help the carcass to cool more quickly. So. I roll the deer on its back, slit the abdominal cavity, and start reaching in to pull whatever I can out of the deer. I cut the diaphragm and guts loose from the abdominal cavity walls, reach as far towards the anus from the inside and cut the lower intestine loose. Like OHH, I couldn't care less about a turd or two. Often I will leave the bladder intact and that's the shape the deer processor sees the body.

    Very sloppy, very quick... well, at least with field dressing a deer...

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Amflyer View Post

      I thought everyone was polite in Canada?
      Just being silly sarcastic. Forgot the smiley face.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by PigHunter View Post

        I don't see where you've got a leg to stand on. You use a dog instead of finding birds on your own. You don't even retrieve them yourself but have the dog do it for you. A real man would do it all himself.
        The dogs are my hunting partners. Fun to watch them work. More fun than shooting the birds in fact. Having the dogs find the birds is absolutely essential, otherwise cripples will go off and die someplace a slow cruel death. Not ethical.

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        • #19
          I learned "field dressing" from my grampa (1893-1974) and dad (1920-1981). They grew up home butchering game and livestock. When they got through gutting a slaughtered animal, it was as clean as any USDA approved slaughterhouse would pass.
          That's just the way it was.
          That converted to field dressing deer too.
          I've flicked several fecal balls out of a deer cavity. No biggie. S#¡t happens.
          I've seen way too many guys whose idea of gutting a deer was a "slash and hack" affair that ended up with all sorts of unwanted body products inside the deer. Feces, urine, bile and stomach contents.
          Thank you but, "No Thanks".
          I'll take the time to part the pelvis and remove the entrails as quickly and cleanly as possible.
          The more quickly and cleanly you gut an animal, the higher quality your table fare.

          Tom wanted nothing but a small, forkhorn buck for his "chili deer".
          At camp, his first action was to remove the two tarsal glands from inside the back legs.
          "That's what makes deer taste gamey!"
          Tossing the scent glands aside, he wiped his gland contaminated knife and hands on his pants leg and proceeded to gut his deer.
          Every year, Tom whined about how gamey his chili tasted!

          ...and I DO NOT wash a carcass out with water. Water speeds up spoilage and removes flavor.

          I'd like to see old Honk try hunting the hardwood bottoms where I grew up!
          ​​​​​​​When the leaves fall, it's like walking in a bowl of corn flakes!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

            Yeah, like I'm going to drag those things around with me when I'm hunting! Guess they would work fine for someone like you who shoots deer out of a blind over a feeder. Just set the loppers out of the way ... on top of the beer fridge next to the TV.
            Honk, no beer 'fridge, mi amigo! I have a "wine cooler" for my Pinot Noir and homemade blackberry wine.
            Couldn't care less about TV and football. I just connect to "wifi" and "compute"! LOL!

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            • #21
              I just roll up my sleeves and have at it, sometimes the job goes easier than others. I'm glad deer guts don't smell as bad as turkey guts.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
                I just roll up my sleeves and have at it, sometimes the job goes easier than others. I'm glad deer guts don't smell as bad as turkey guts.
                First time I gutted a turkey, I had no idea that was coming. It was touch-and-go there for a second.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by MattM37 View Post

                  First time I gutted a turkey, I had no idea that was coming. It was touch-and-go there for a second.
                  I don't gut turkeys.
                  First, I remove the wings. (calls)
                  Next comes the legs and thighs. (turkey salad)
                  Last, the breast is removed whole.
                  Remove the beard and spurs and the rest goes in the dumpster, or where the vermin can get to them.

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                  • #24
                    I'm obsessive about clean meat. I circle the buthole with a sharp knife, then use the small bone saw to carefully cut the pelvic bone while shielding the rest of the guts with my other hand palm up. Then split the legs apart. I've already cut up through the middle of the ribs and reach way the heck up to grab and then slice the trachea. The trachea is the handle I use to pull everything else out with pausing to salvage heart/lungs/liver, being careful of the upper intestine. I think that upper intestine is where the juices that can spoil meat exist. When most of the guts are pulled out of the body cavity I pull the circled buhole up between the cuts of the pelvic bone and everything rolls on out.

                    Bottom of the back legs has good meat, (two huge roasts thawing now) and I don't want to get them tainted by anything. I'm much more worried about upper intestine and bladder than I am a couple of turds. I've cut up a lot more elk than deer. A yearling elk is about the size of a large mule deer buck, maybe bigger. Moose are even bigger. I've heard gut piles from bison are very large. Funny thing is when you go back to look all you can find is a stain on the ground and the loose undigested grass the critter was eating. Ravens.

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                    • #25
                      Since I was a kid, have kept a sturdy, heavy, rubber band around the handle of my gutting knife. After freeing the anus I stretch the band around it. Works for me

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