Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hunting alone.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    I've killed enough deer. Not many by others measure, but enough for me I reckon.
    That and being cold easier, and achy............it's hard for me to punish myself. Esp for a doe tag.
    Hunting with a bud gets me out of the house. It also makes me stay in stand longer when I do go. But we have hunted together off and on for decades. Deer hunted together the last twenty years. Got no prob playing dog for the other when things come to a stop.

    He got that 8 up for me last yr. Bedded halfway between us LOL.

    We don't do drives per se'. we just see a buck heading to the other and if it doesn't show up, go for a wind bump. Not kicking up deer, just bump them casually in direction of the guy in stand.
    Its a good way to warm up frozen toes.

    Comment


    • #32
      I like hunting off the ground, sit a while, move to another location, sit a while.
      Kill half my deer from the ground. Half of those still hunting. Had a big enough place to do that.
      Current hunting spot is very small in comparison. Only killed one sneaking up on it.

      Comment


      • #33
        Just finished 12 days hunting alone, well my boy was with me one day, but other than that. I have two buddies in the area that are ready at the drop of a hat to assist if necessary but I know how to cut up and pack out an elk, you just do it in pieces. I also bought an emergency beacon a few years ago and it changed things a lot though I know that the places I go it might well take someone at least overnight to get to me anyway. One can't expect miracles.

        Last week for whatever reason I decided to explore a sidehill out of a steep canyon and picked my way up between ledge systems. Probably close to a thousand feet elevation gain and mostly rocky soil without much of anything a deer would want to eat. Didn't see one track and there was plenty of snow to show them in, biggest waste of a day.

        Some days are colder, some are warmer, doesn't much matter, I've got clothes in reserve and I'm always warm enough. Have a stove and chicken soup and tea and what not. If I spend the night out it won't be so bad, probably get some sleep. Lucked into a bull early on but just spent the past 8 days trying to sneak up on a mule deer buck in the woods, hardly got close to doe groups, loud snow and I'm a lousy hunter. Oh well, still have a few days left of bear and then there is private land.

        Alone is the only way to go, make half the noise. Private land is another story, just go pot a cow. Yuck it up with the boys.

        Comment


        • #34
          Treestand hunting............always good to have somebody around. If hunting alone, at least make sure somebody back home knows where you will be, and where your stand is.

          Sat is opener of gun. Will be with a bud.
          Small private ground, opposite sides. Can't even see each other.

          Had a gall bladder attack and had to crawl into my truck once. Made it to vehicle walking, barely.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
            Guess I don't count sitting in a stand after leaving camp full of family or hunting partners as "hunting alone." Spending the night by myself at camp or on the trail seventy miles from anywhere is about as alone as it gets.

            I enjoy hunting in foul weather as much as fair. Probably more if conditions are bad because I find it challenging ... and no one else is out and about to contaminate the experience. But then again I am mostly a stalker, whether after big game or birds. If I had to sit in a tree stand I doubt I would enjoy it ... foul weather or fair. I agree with Steve Rinella's thinking (whoever he is): the challenging days in the woods are the ones that are most memorable. And memories are the most worthwhile objective of hunting and fishing. Sticks with you a lot longer than the meat.

            We are in the midst of the third snow storm since arriving in Montana. I may go bird hunting when it stops after sunup but would likely have to four wheel it down the highway thirty miles. That could be a bit too risky. I'll have to carefully assess. Highway is narrow and very busy with several bridges along the way to ice up. Transport trucks driven by morons are always the biggest concern. One of those sent my wife to her maker nine years ago last month. Also Sunday hunters will be out. Might be a good day to watch football instead. Watching TV instead of hunting ... argh!

            99, my bones aren't out there and you have read a pile of my experiences from the last fifty-some years hunting alone. Driving to my hunting spots was a lot more dangerous than spending a week in the woods by myself. A helluva lot more dangerous! Had many more near death experiences on the road than I did hunting.
            I did venture out and it was nasty. Finally quit snowing and highway was icy but cold enough so that there was some grip. Nevertheless four-wheeled it all the way. Temps dropped significantly and a foot of new powder by the time I was in the field. The wind kicked up on the walk out and it was difficult. I wasn't quite dressed for it. Should have dug out my hood and better pair of glomitts. Made a long shot on a sharptail but missed getting one of three roosters bunched together on the way back to the rig. My hands were too cold to work safety and trigger. Poor Puppy! As we were coming out I kept hearing this clack-clack noise as she was running along in front of me. It was huge ice balls in her fur banging against each other. Snow was up to her belly or chin depending on the location. Ground was still not cold enough to freeze low spots with high saline surface water (temperature was -10 but +50 the day before) and both of us went through several times. My new Muck boots kept me dry but poor little stinker had a tough time with ice between her toes. She came through fine. In this place I was never more than a half mile or so from rancher's house so hunting was never terribly risky ... the highway was more of a concern. It was Sunday so traffic was light. Deer were not moving so not worried much about tagging one in the headlights on the way home. Experience with myself, conditions, and location was the key to a reasonably safe day.

            Comment


            • #36
              This weekend will be dedicated to Youth Hunt at the WMA's so I'll definitely stay well away from that. Maybe it's time to use the crossbow and take one of the yard deer.

              Our 4-day special primitive weapons season starts next Monday and I may take a vacation day and hunt alone at my favorite WMA with the CVA electric ignition muzzleloader. The wind will be out of the South with highs in the mid 60's and lows in the mid 40's. It will be still hunting mostly with sitting against a tree when I feel like taking a rest.

              Our gun season starts a week from Saturday, on the 23rd. I'll tote the 6.5 Creedmoor for the first day and then start alternating with other rifles. All hunting alone will be from the ground.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

                I did venture out and it was nasty. Finally quit snowing and highway was icy but cold enough so that there was some grip. Nevertheless four-wheeled it all the way. Temps dropped significantly and a foot of new powder by the time I was in the field. The wind kicked up on the walk out and it was difficult. I wasn't quite dressed for it. Should have dug out my hood and better pair of glomitts. Made a long shot on a sharptail but missed getting one of three roosters bunched together on the way back to the rig. My hands were too cold to work safety and trigger. Poor Puppy! As we were coming out I kept hearing this clack-clack noise as she was running along in front of me. It was huge ice balls in her fur banging against each other. Snow was up to her belly or chin depending on the location. Ground was still not cold enough to freeze low spots with high saline surface water (temperature was -10 but +50 the day before) and both of us went through several times. My new Muck boots kept me dry but poor little stinker had a tough time with ice between her toes. She came through fine. In this place I was never more than a half mile or so from rancher's house so hunting was never terribly risky ... the highway was more of a concern. It was Sunday so traffic was light. Deer were not moving so not worried much about tagging one in the headlights on the way home. Experience with myself, conditions, and location was the key to a reasonably safe day.
                No wind today so I drove out for an afternoon hunt in a foot of snow and single digit temperature. Worked Ellie. Dressed better today with hood and heavier glomitts but didn't help much. Gad, was it cold! A very slight breeze kicked up late in the day, making it impossible to keep my hands warm enough to work the gun. Made a tough shot on a sharpie through the trees and then just at end of shooting hours when we were within sight of the Jimmy Ellie pushed a rooster into me. Dang thing blew up out of yellow clover about three feet away. I managed to pull off the glomitt and get on the gun in time to make the shot. Didn't kill him but he wasn't going anywhere. Shaking hard when I got to the Jimmy and had a lot of trouble getting the key in the door lock. I four wheeled it all the way back to town on icy highway.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

                  No wind today so I drove out for an afternoon hunt in a foot of snow and single digit temperature. Worked Ellie. Dressed better today with hood and heavier glomitts but didn't help much. Gad, was it cold! A very slight breeze kicked up late in the day, making it impossible to keep my hands warm enough to work the gun. Made a tough shot on a sharpie through the trees and then just at end of shooting hours when we were within sight of the Jimmy Ellie pushed a rooster into me. Dang thing blew up out of yellow clover about three feet away. I managed to pull off the glomitt and get on the gun in time to make the shot. Didn't kill him but he wasn't going anywhere. Shaking hard when I got to the Jimmy and had a lot of trouble getting the key in the door lock. I four wheeled it all the way back to town on icy highway.
                  It seems like you have a death wish. One mishap and you would be in serious trouble with that kind of cold. Rather than stay home, is there some way you could dress better for the conditions? I've rarely hunted in single digits but with the right boots, socks, headwear, gloves, and layering you should be able to keep warmer than that if on the move. Do you use any disposable handwarmers?

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Gun season for deer is the only time I don't hunt alone, and even then it's a matter of hunting alone and then meeting up at various times through the day. Sometimes -- my brother being the chatty sort, when it's just the two of us, anyway -- the meet-ups get pretty lengthy, but that's alright with me. I like those days, plus I always have several days each season when I am by myself and actually try hard to get a deer.

                    I very seldom fish with anyone else. Fishing small creeks and wading small rivers is what I like most, and that's not so conducive to social fishing. When my siblings were younger (I'm youngest of six and pushing 50 myself), we'd occasionally make a family outing to a state park, and there'd be a pier or shoreline that we'd all fish from, which was always good. Even better when the little nieces and nephews started coming along.

                    A couple years ago, I tried to put together a day of charterboat salmon-fishing for me and the aging ones, but it never panned out. Still hoping to do it while everyone is still around.

                    I'm just solitary by nature, especially outdoors. Grew up in the boonies with lots of woods and my own stretch of trout stream. By age nine or ten I was roaming all over the place, by myself, and never felt lonely. I had one good buddy who was into the outdoors like me, but when he'd come over we'd mainly just fish the crick and end up goofing off. On that note, I can only say: If you've never had a cow-patty fight on a hot summer day, you haven't lived.
                    Last edited by MattM37; 11-12-2019, 10:47 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
                      Grew up in the boonies with lots of woods and my own stretch of trout stream. By age nine or ten I was roaming all over the place, by myself, and never felt lonely. I had one good buddy who was into the outdoors like me, but when he'd come over we'd mainly just fish the crick and end up goofing off. On that note, I can only say: If you've never had a cow-patty fight on a hot summer day, you haven't lived.
                      I have two younger brothers close in age. We grew up not too far out of the way but enough to have plenty of woods to roam. Mom ran us out of the house in all kinds of weather and we played in the barn if it was raining or really cold. Some of the neighborhood boys would come over and we'd build tunnels in the hay loft using the bales for structure. Inside, our constructions would be warm even in the coldest part of winter.

                      Yep, we had cow paddy fights and threw many horse turds at one another. A fresh tilled farm plot provided a wealth of dirt clods to chunk. But the pine cone battles were the ones we got in trouble for because of the scratched faces.

                      About the most dangerous were the spear battles. We'd go down to the creek and cut canes, leaving them blunt on the fat end and just a few leaves on the small. Then we would choose teams and throw the spears at one another across the creek.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        PH, I call it quits down around 10 deg. I do use a muffler and keep a jon-E hand warmer inside the muffler. My Filson Double Mackinaw parka works great and with a little layering can accommodate a range of temperatures.
                        When I started hunting about all we had was wool, and it was marginal by itself. When we got thinsulate, Goretex and Hollowfill we thought we died and went to heaven.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by PigHunter View Post

                          I have two younger brothers close in age. We grew up not too far out of the way but enough to have plenty of woods to roam. Mom ran us out of the house in all kinds of weather and we played in the barn if it was raining or really cold. Some of the neighborhood boys would come over and we'd build tunnels in the hay loft using the bales for structure. Inside, our constructions would be warm even in the coldest part of winter.

                          Yep, we had cow paddy fights and threw many horse turds at one another. A fresh tilled farm plot provided a wealth of dirt clods to chunk. But the pine cone battles were the ones we got in trouble for because of the scratched faces.

                          About the most dangerous were the spear battles. We'd go down to the creek and cut canes, leaving them blunt on the fat end and just a few leaves on the small. Then we would choose teams and throw the spears at one another across the creek.
                          Good times indeed! The cow-patty you wanted to find was one that had begun to dry, so you had something solid to throw, but still had plenty of gooey moistness inside. Nothing like the satisfaction of hearing your best buddy yell with pain AND seeing the greenish-brown goo splatter all over him.

                          We did some damage at apple time, too. We had a couple trees that dropped tennis-ball sized green apples, perfect for throwing. We'd use garbage-can lids for shields. My buddy's sister at age eleven or twelve was like the Xena Warrior Princess of apple-fights. She caught me full-on in the cheekbone one time and knocked me flat. Later in high school she turned into quite a beauty (and a pretty vicious field-hockey player). More than once I have wondered where she is today, and if somehow she might be available.
                          Last edited by MattM37; 11-12-2019, 12:10 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by PigHunter View Post

                            It seems like you have a death wish. One mishap and you would be in serious trouble with that kind of cold. Rather than stay home, is there some way you could dress better for the conditions? I've rarely hunted in single digits but with the right boots, socks, headwear, gloves, and layering you should be able to keep warmer than that if on the move. Do you use any disposable handwarmers?
                            I was okay except for my hands. Feet never got cold in the new Muck boots (the Wetland ones I reviewed here two years ago were wore to rags). Only wearing a light pair of "railroad socks". Four layers for torso: Upland vest (with light fleece lining), GoreTex waterfowl jacket, forty year-old buffalo check Woolrich shirt, and lightweight Lycra camo shirt I bought for Africa. Only one layer lower torso: Dickey's canvas carpenter's pants. But I need the flexibility in deep snow so wool pants stayed at home (they can get chewed up pretty bad in Russian olive brush). Thanks to the boots and jacket only a small part of my upper legs are exposed directly. The canvas bucks any breeze that comes up.

                            It is important to learn how to balance clothing requirements in cold weather when on the move all the time. My synthetic shirt is not warm but it wicks away sweat and breathes well. Wool shirt does essentially all the insulation. Just enough while I'm on the move. Too much insulation and I get wet with sweat and that can be dangerous, especially if I get hurt and stuck someplace. Many a snowmobiler has perished trying to walk out in his/her plastic snow suit. The smart ones in my country carry an extra change of clothes for walking out that won't fill up with sweat. If I get too sweaty my glasses are always fogging up too. Not fun! Carrying a lot of extra clothing and emergency equipment with me can also be more threatening than reassuring. Besides overheating due to excess baggage, there's also maintaining balance which can be critical in rough country and/or deep snow. Don't want to invite a sprained ankle or knee. I admit to short changing myself on fuel yesterday. Absolutely dumb that I didn't at least have a couple of candy bars thrown in the game bag of my vest. Would have made a big difference with the shivering. However, I kept checking myself talking to the dog and could tell I was never even close to being seriously hyperthermic. Yes, a broken leg might have been scary ... if my cell phone didn't work. But it was charged and very good coverage in the area. Most of the time I was within a mile of the rancher's house and I have his phone in my cell. He or his wife are usually watching out for me anyway.

                            I would love to go back out again today. Temps are warming up to freezing and no wind. Would be great weather for hunting. Birds will be moving around to feed after that long cold snap. But this afternoon the forecast is for freezing rain and there's still an inch or two of snow/ice on the highway. Even in 4x4 it would be downright reckless to be out on that narrow two-lane busy road with maybe a dozen bridges to navigate. Sigh! So I'm staying put. See if I can get in touch with local US veterans affairs office about hearing aids. And maybe try to run down someone about cashing in my US employees retirement ... five years late. That might buy me a couple more trips to Africa.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Apple fights, that brings back memories. In Boy Scouts our troop leader would let us line up on a back road that had a couple apple trees spaced about 40 yards apart. We’d cut sticks about 1/2’-3/4” in diameter, 3’-4’ long and sharpen one end. Impale an apple and heave away. Kind of a spin on dodge ball. Worst that ever happened was one kid took a shot to the groin flattening him.

                              My how times have changed.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
                                Apple fights, that brings back memories. In Boy Scouts our troop leader would let us line up on a back road that had a couple apple trees spaced about 40 yards apart. We’d cut sticks about 1/2’-3/4” in diameter, 3’-4’ long and sharpen one end. Impale an apple and heave away. Kind of a spin on dodge ball. Worst that ever happened was one kid took a shot to the groin flattening him.

                                My how times have changed.
                                Wow. I remember using those sticks to see how far we could fling an apple, but never at one another. You guys were hardcore.

                                So, how does the flavor of Rocky Mountain mulie compare to Catskill whitetail?

                                Comment

                                Welcome!

                                Collapse

                                Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                                If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                                And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                                Right Rail 1

                                Collapse

                                Top Active Users

                                Collapse

                                There are no top active users.

                                Right Rail 2

                                Collapse

                                Latest Topics

                                Collapse

                                Right Rail 3

                                Collapse

                                Footer Ad

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X