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  • #16
    Guess I don't count sitting in a stand after leaving camp full of family or hunting partners as "hunting alone." Spending the night by myself at camp or on the trail seventy miles from anywhere is about as alone as it gets.

    I enjoy hunting in foul weather as much as fair. Probably more if conditions are bad because I find it challenging ... and no one else is out and about to contaminate the experience. But then again I am mostly a stalker, whether after big game or birds. If I had to sit in a tree stand I doubt I would enjoy it ... foul weather or fair. I agree with Steve Rinella's thinking (whoever he is): the challenging days in the woods are the ones that are most memorable. And memories are the most worthwhile objective of hunting and fishing. Sticks with you a lot longer than the meat.

    We are in the midst of the third snow storm since arriving in Montana. I may go bird hunting when it stops after sunup but would likely have to four wheel it down the highway thirty miles. That could be a bit too risky. I'll have to carefully assess. Highway is narrow and very busy with several bridges along the way to ice up. Transport trucks driven by morons are always the biggest concern. One of those sent my wife to her maker nine years ago last month. Also Sunday hunters will be out. Might be a good day to watch football instead. Watching TV instead of hunting ... argh!

    99, my bones aren't out there and you have read a pile of my experiences from the last fifty-some years hunting alone. Driving to my hunting spots was a lot more dangerous than spending a week in the woods by myself. A helluva lot more dangerous! Had many more near death experiences on the road than I did hunting.

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    • #17
      Since I'm in the quotation mood, and I have a cup of coffee and a warm pointer in my toes, here's a few from my favorite MacQuarrie story:

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      A few tidbits about this story.

      I found this many years ago in a F & S compilation. 100 year commemorative collection. It was a real favorite of mine, putting eloquently to words what a lot of us feel about time in the woods.

      Later, I started putting a little library collection together if my favorite works about hunting, and wanted to include the Gordon Macquarrie duck hunters trilogy. A little spendy, being out of print for the most part, but found a good used copy for an OK price.

      Found out two things: The F&S version was slightly added to, presumably by the author, and the original version, in the book "Stories of the Old Duck Hunters, and Other Drivel" came with an editorial note giving some background for the story.

      Macquarrie is hunting along because this is the first hunt after his hunting partner and FIL has passed. The loss is pretty clear, if you look for clues. Later, he would find a new hunting partner (see "The Old Brown Mackinaw" but for this story, he's in the field alone.

      Great story; check it out if you are so inclined.

      "Nothing to do for three weeks."




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      • #18
        Sounds interesting Amflyer, thanks ! It would seem to be much in the perspective of where I have ‘slipped’ into in my feelings at my elevated age, both physically and mentally, and lend to help me understand the ‘whys’ of such ! There has been considerable bewilderment in those matters !

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        • #19
          I almost always hunt alone and enjoy the solitude. However, I carry enough equipment in my backpack to stay the night in the woods if necessary. That includes some type of shelter, means of making fire, means of purifying water, methods of applying first aid, etc. When in a canoe, I also have a dry bag with change of clothes and a towel, just in case.

          I admit to taking some calculated risks but that's part of the spice of life. The safer thing would be to stay home and watch TV, read, or make posts here at F&S.

          At 60, it is time for making contingency plans to continue hunting. So, I'm going to start working in at least one guided hunt per year. I'll probably stop hunting public land by the time I turn 70 but for now am still strong and have no problems with my legs so I hope this will be a good season.

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          • #20
            Always enjoyed the musings of Gene Hill. I feel this is probably along the same lines.
            Another writer that I've discovered is Lewis Grizzard. His writing aren't about the outdoors, but life in general. Good read. Look up his book, "Kathy Sue Loudermilk, I love you!"

            https://www.thriftbooks.com/series/g...trilogy/44440/

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            • #21
              I think I could count on one hand the number of times I’ve hunted alone in the last several years, the boy’s been right by my side otherwise. I wouldn’t trade any of it, but will admit to missing getting lost in my own thoughts on occasion. Next year he won’t legally have to sit with me, but my daughter will more than likely be taking his place. Maybe not as often depending on the weather and whatever else is going on in the world of a teenaged girl. I’ve been wondering how I’ll transition back to being alone on the hill or in the grouse woods. I’ve already warned my wife she may be taking road trips in the future, not for her to go hunting but just to be there at the end of the day.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
                I think I could count on one hand the number of times I’ve hunted alone in the last several years, the boy’s been right by my side otherwise. I wouldn’t trade any of it, but will admit to missing getting lost in my own thoughts on occasion. Next year he won’t legally have to sit with me, but my daughter will more than likely be taking his place. Maybe not as often depending on the weather and whatever else is going on in the world of a teenaged girl. I’ve been wondering how I’ll transition back to being alone on the hill or in the grouse woods. I’ve already warned my wife she may be taking road trips in the future, not for her to go hunting but just to be there at the end of the day.
                I would trade many of my lone hunter days to have accompanied an offspring.
                All I can offer fitch270 is, don't short the girl.
                Not that she will go as often, but at least give her the opportunity.

                As long as the weather isn't TOO extreme, my wife will accompany me on afternoon hunts.
                Regardless of how still and quiet, early mornings and hard frosts "ain't her thang"! LOL!

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                • #23
                  Yup, but can get 30 mins to an hour and 30 mins before it normally picks up due to thermals.
                  This time it jumped considerably, before daylight.

                  Tolerable today............and the place empty.
                  Did hear a yote at dawn next woods over. Proly came through before I got there and ran everything out.

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                  • #24
                    I've sat and froze in the wind for eve hunts waiting for the last 30 min when it dies off.
                    Not doing that tonight.
                    Am done w pointy sticks. Gun season opens Sat.
                    Pew pew pew.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
                      I almost always hunt alone and enjoy the solitude. However, I carry enough equipment in my backpack to stay the night in the woods if necessary. That includes some type of shelter, means of making fire, means of purifying water, methods of applying first aid, etc. When in a canoe, I also have a dry bag with change of clothes and a towel, just in case.

                      I admit to taking some calculated risks but that's part of the spice of life. The safer thing would be to stay home and watch TV, read, or make posts here at F&S.

                      At 60, it is time for making contingency plans to continue hunting. So, I'm going to start working in at least one guided hunt per year. I'll probably stop hunting public land by the time I turn 70 but for now am still strong and have no problems with my legs so I hope this will be a good season.
                      pighunter, relish your good health and enjoy your "lone" freedom as long as you can.
                      Even in my current physical condition, I feel I can still hunt "on my own", but with restrictions.
                      You will find as systems begin to fall apart and fail, it gets harder and harder to admit.
                      Just don't be "blind" to the tell tale signs.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post

                        pighunter, relish your good health and enjoy your "lone" freedom as long as you can.
                        Even in my current physical condition, I feel I can still hunt "on my own", but with restrictions.
                        You will find as systems begin to fall apart and fail, it gets harder and harder to admit.
                        Just don't be "blind" to the tell tale signs.
                        I hear ya Bubba. Already I've just about stopped using my climbing stand even though I've got an excellent fall restraint with let-down features. My pay-hunt next month will require ladder stand hunting in the mornings so I'll just be extra careful.

                        I really wish one of my children would take an interest in hunting but so far it hasn't happened. Perhaps one of the step great grand-kids will want to join me. The oldest doesn't seem to have the fire but that youngest boy could easily become a killer!

                        PigHuntress is a few years older than me and has become really cautious in the woods because she fears breaking a hip if she were to fall. Thus I plan easier hunts when she's along. Pop-ups or other enclosed blinds work best because she's always fidgeting with her hair, straightening her clothes and checking her make-up.

                        I've offered to teach a couple of women to hunt who have expressed interest. All with PigHuntress' blessing of course. But so far it's just been talk.

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                        • #27
                          PigHunter- That youngest boy who "could easily become a killer" should join the Army.
                          When I graduated advanced infantry training in the Army, our company commander announced that henceforth we were all "paid professional killers."
                          Someone in the ranks behind me was heard to say, "My mother would be so proud!"

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                          • #28
                            My dad shot varmints, was a shooter/reloader. But not really a hunter (blood bothers him, can't even watch surgery stuff on TV).

                            My grandma shot small game and pheasant on the farm, but that was before I was around.

                            Nobody really hunted.

                            Dunno what my fam thought, me trapping, hunting and fishing. My kids have been around it, tolerate/accept it..........but none really does it. Youngest kinda interested, but weather hard on her.......shoulder surgery in March has her still ouchy when weather shifts.

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                            • #29
                              Screw in steps and a hang on stand. About killed me climbing in today. Messed up arm and back, just climbing up overdid it. Pretty uncomfortable sit, didn't even see a deer. Got to truck aching, was only 15 mins into drive home and was ahhhhhhhhhhhh.

                              Jeep seat was mighty comfy, took most of the pain away. Not sure if big weather change coming part of it, slept wrong or just meanness coming out LOL

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                              • #30
                                Should buy a ladder stand. If property more secure, would. Had a truck slow roll me today as I was in stand (no way they saw). Only thing visible was my truck.

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