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  • Regarding your reloads...

    What thing or step do you do or not do that you think add's to your accuracy for a given caliber and rifle combination ?

  • #2
    I believe in weighing each charge individually, as I do not trust powder charge throwers.

    Comment


    • #3
      What do I do, or NOT do?
      I "DO NOT" but my ammo off a store shelf.
      I can't say for sure that makes my ammo any more or less accurate, but I get exactly what I want at a lesser price, whether the store is open or not.

      Comment


      • #4
        My gun smith friend always told me, only have the powder your going to use on the bench.

        Comment


        • #5
          What do I do Or Not do!
          I don't shoot Re-loads in any of my Firearms !:-((
          I do use only Factory Loaded Ammo in all my Firearms!:-))
          I'm NOT in need of 1/16th" MOA @ 200Yd when my targets are less then 100yd away:-))

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
            I believe in weighing each charge individually, as I do not trust powder charge throwers.
            Me too.

            Comment


            • #7
              I only got into reloading because the cost saving and it seemed like a fun hobby. Out of my 30-06 I've noticed the reloads that were only neck sized shoot ever so slightly smaller groups, but both ways give me groups tighter than I care to worry about.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by rockhound View Post
                My gun smith friend always told me, only have the powder your going to use on the bench.
                Good advice and keep the container closed and don't leave any powder in the powder dispenser. If you do and forget what it was, throw it out on the lawn to dispose of. Powder is a lot cheaper than a firearm or injury to yourself.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
                  I believe in weighing each charge individually, as I do not trust powder charge throwers.
                  When I first started in the '70's, my RCBS powder thrower was so erratic (as checked with an RCBS beam balance) I sent it back to RCBS. They looked at it and sent it back saying it was o.k.. I immediately got an electronic analytical balance with certified check weights and have been checking powder charges ever since. I also weigh bullets and separate them by increments of .1gm. My balance weighs to .01grain.
                  If you ever find one from a high school or university that works good they are a great investment, although the new dispensers that are hooked to a electronic balance seem to function well.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have found over the years, by actual testing, that some of the steps which seem popular make no difference at all to how the loads perform, and some may in fact have adverse effects either on velocity SD or case life. As a result, I do not clean primer pockets, I do not tumble my brass, though I do give it a rinse in hot soapy water to remove any grit if it is dirty. I throw all my charges, recording the settings on the thrower for next time when I have settled on a charge. I don't full-length size, and prefer Lee Collet Dies for my neck sizing. I have several rifles which will average well under 1 moa with my loads (running average of five round groups, not just the best one) and brass which has gone well past 30 loading cycles and is still perfectly serviceable.

                    I use some calibres for which factory loads aren't so readily available, or for which factory loads are very expensive, so apart from accuracy and the ability to use loads which are tailored to what I want I save money too.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Daniel I respectfully disagree, I believe that the less you pay attention to detail the more chance of failure. Neck sizing does extend case life but beside that the rest your leaving to chance. Clean cases aid in inspection, case life and the over all quality of the round and rifle it's being fired in. Like others have already stated measuring every powder charge is an imperative, powder chargers are suspect be can be off and inconsistent at times . Just for safety it's a good idea to check. I also use BR primers because I find it gives me more consistent numbers on the chronograph . What you do works for you but we are exchanging information to young and new loaders and to go through all the steps is important because of safety reasons.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
                        I believe in weighing each charge individually, as I do not trust powder charge throwers.
                        I measure every charge also, I wouldn't feel good about it if I didn't !

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DanielM View Post
                          I have found over the years, by actual testing, that some of the steps which seem popular make no difference at all to how the loads perform, and some may in fact have adverse effects either on velocity SD or case life. As a result, I do not clean primer pockets, I do not tumble my brass, though I do give it a rinse in hot soapy water to remove any grit if it is dirty. I throw all my charges, recording the settings on the thrower for next time when I have settled on a charge. I don't full-length size, and prefer Lee Collet Dies for my neck sizing. I have several rifles which will average well under 1 moa with my loads (running average of five round groups, not just the best one) and brass which has gone well past 30 loading cycles and is still perfectly serviceable.

                          I use some calibres for which factory loads aren't so readily available, or for which factory loads are very expensive, so apart from accuracy and the ability to use loads which are tailored to what I want I save money too.
                          I agree, some things that were gospel have made no difference at all for me. I have never turned a case neck. I have never grouped brass by weight - just the same lot is good enough. However, for max accuracy I do group my bullets by weight to the .01gr..
                          I do use the round wire brush on my Lyman trimmer to knock the carbon out of a primer pocket, but I have never done anything to the pocket flash hole.
                          I do neck size on a lot of calibers and the Lee Collet die rules (yellow box).
                          All of my firearms have the accuracy required including my varmint rifles, if a rifle does not have the accuracy after several attempts, it looses it's place in the safe.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I clean my cases including primer pockets and necks even if I am neck sizing.
                            I weigh each charge and go back and pull a couple out of the batch to check for scale drift.
                            I do neck size brass to extend case life, but only final zero with full length sized rounds and only hunt with new brass along with a couple new cases fired to confirm zero. So I'm going through maybe 5 or six new cases per season per caliber. Not a big deal for many, but with Weatherby cases almost $2 apiece, it adds up.
                            I use the same primers for each load.
                            Forgive me if my reply is a bit verbose. Happy Trails

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pmacc60 View Post
                              Daniel I respectfully disagree, I believe that the less you pay attention to detail the more chance of failure. Neck sizing does extend case life but beside that the rest your leaving to chance. Clean cases aid in inspection, case life and the over all quality of the round and rifle it's being fired in. Like others have already stated measuring every powder charge is an imperative, powder chargers are suspect be can be off and inconsistent at times . Just for safety it's a good idea to check. I also use BR primers because I find it gives me more consistent numbers on the chronograph . What you do works for you but we are exchanging information to young and new loaders and to go through all the steps is important because of safety reasons.
                              I didn't say I don't pay attention to detail. What I did say is that I don't perform tasks for which actual testing by me has demonstrated no benefit, or even a detriment.

                              A case in point: "clean cases aid in inspection, case life and overall quality of the round". Actually, tumbling, which is what I was talking about, doesn't make it any easier to inspect rounds, and can indeed remove evidence of problems. It also removes the slightly protective patina which develops on your brass over time. The only time I do more than rinse is when I anneal necks, after a few reload cycles, and then I give the neck a quick once-over with 0000 steel wool to make it easier to see progression of the colour changes.

                              "Measuring every powder charge is imperative" - yes, I agree, and I measure every one. I just don't weigh them. By actual experiment I established that velocity consistency and accuracy is at least as good, if not better, with my thrown charges. I'm not talking theory but empirical results.It is worth noting that manufacturers and benchresters also throw all charges. The important thing is consistency in the throwing method, and gear which gives results which are repeatable enough (which all but eliminates typical electronic systems, BTW).

                              In talking to young reloaders there's a lot of guff told to them, about doing things which actually do no good at all. Cleaning primer pockets for example, a complete waste of time. Better that they read widely, understand the reasons for doing things, and understand also those things which do no good.

                              Comment

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