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Does anyone have any tips for coyote hunting with Foxpro's Deadbone caller? Preferable for Michigan but I will take any info from anyone!

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  • Does anyone have any tips for coyote hunting with Foxpro's Deadbone caller? Preferable for Michigan but I will take any info from anyone!

    Does anyone have any tips for coyote hunting with Foxpro's Deadbone caller? Preferable for Michigan but I will take any info from anyone!

  • #2
    I went to a FoxPro seminar and they used a two man technique in heavily coyote populated Texas. At night, one would hold the Red light and scan for the coyote and a shooter was at the ready with a shotgun. When the coyote came in, in an instant, the red lens changed to white light and the guy took the shot. Very fast action.

    Comment


    • #3
      It works, so:

      1) Hunt where there are hungry coyotes. The best call and technique in the world won't work if there are no coyotes ready to feed.

      2) Sit quiet and still for 15-20 minutes before the call to mask your approach.

      3) I like using a trigger stick bi-pod to hold the rifle still above grass and brush and to get a solid aim at those who don't come close.

      4) They are really stupid and bold at night. Any time you can hunt full moonlight over fresh snow, you will have your best odds. They are not worried about human scent or anything for that matter at night because they typically have no fear at night.

      5) You don't have to over call. They can remember exactly where the sound came from even if they were a mile or two away when they heard it.

      6) Sit with at least two people to avoid the shooter having to watch his back. This reduces movement and really improves your odds. You rarely know which direction they will come. They can come out of nowhere.

      7) If they are coming, let them keep coming. They often stop for a while at a fair distance to survey and watch. Some shooters get nervous and take a poor shot. Wait them out and give them another short squeal. They typically keep coming. I've waited to see just how close they will get and in one case actually had one put his nose on my rifle barrel to check it out. He was coming from down wind too. He was HUNGRY!

      8) Set your call and any decoy you use as far from you as you can. They lock in on the exact location of the sound but may detect you from a distance if you are too close to the call. If the call is 30 yards away, you will see their eyes locked in on that exact piece of ground.

      Good luck! The most important thing is getting out there and keeping #1 in mind.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
        It works, so:

        1) Hunt where there are hungry coyotes. The best call and technique in the world won't work if there are no coyotes ready to feed.

        2) Sit quiet and still for 15-20 minutes before the call to mask your approach.

        3) I like using a trigger stick bi-pod to hold the rifle still above grass and brush and to get a solid aim at those who don't come close.

        4) They are really stupid and bold at night. Any time you can hunt full moonlight over fresh snow, you will have your best odds. They are not worried about human scent or anything for that matter at night because they typically have no fear at night.

        5) You don't have to over call. They can remember exactly where the sound came from even if they were a mile or two away when they heard it.

        6) Sit with at least two people to avoid the shooter having to watch his back. This reduces movement and really improves your odds. You rarely know which direction they will come. They can come out of nowhere.

        7) If they are coming, let them keep coming. They often stop for a while at a fair distance to survey and watch. Some shooters get nervous and take a poor shot. Wait them out and give them another short squeal. They typically keep coming. I've waited to see just how close they will get and in one case actually had one put his nose on my rifle barrel to check it out. He was coming from down wind too. He was HUNGRY!

        8) Set your call and any decoy you use as far from you as you can. They lock in on the exact location of the sound but may detect you from a distance if you are too close to the call. If the call is 30 yards away, you will see their eyes locked in on that exact piece of ground.

        Good luck! The most important thing is getting out there and keeping #1 in mind.
        What is your typical calling sequence? By this I mean how long do you make noise and what sounds do you use and then how long do you wait between when you call?

        Comment


        • #5
          I have tried calling some at night with no luck. I have a gun mounted light with a pressure switch. I use a green light because I figure that if a dog can see a red laser pointer they can probably see a red light so I have used green, but I have yet to see a coyote out hunting them! During day or night!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
            I went to a FoxPro seminar and they used a two man technique in heavily coyote populated Texas. At night, one would hold the Red light and scan for the coyote and a shooter was at the ready with a shotgun. When the coyote came in, in an instant, the red lens changed to white light and the guy took the shot. Very fast action.
            What did they say about the way that they call?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
              I went to a FoxPro seminar and they used a two man technique in heavily coyote populated Texas. At night, one would hold the Red light and scan for the coyote and a shooter was at the ready with a shotgun. When the coyote came in, in an instant, the red lens changed to white light and the guy took the shot. Very fast action.
              The video they played used their top end call but I can't remember any specific call or sequence. Try their web site and they may have some video's there. They talked a lot about your location and how you have to watch your back as they will circle before they come too close. All this was in a heavy populated place so I don't know if it works where there are fewer animals. I usually get mine when deer or turkey hunting.
              I let a trapper on my place for beaver and coyote and he says he does best tracking in the winter for the coyotes.

              Comment


              • #8
                What little bit of coyote hunting I've done. The first call sequence is never at full volume. There maybe one closer than what you realize. And wait a while before calling let the area settle down before you start calling.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                  I went to a FoxPro seminar and they used a two man technique in heavily coyote populated Texas. At night, one would hold the Red light and scan for the coyote and a shooter was at the ready with a shotgun. When the coyote came in, in an instant, the red lens changed to white light and the guy took the shot. Very fast action.
                  Ok Thanks!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
                    It works, so:

                    1) Hunt where there are hungry coyotes. The best call and technique in the world won't work if there are no coyotes ready to feed.

                    2) Sit quiet and still for 15-20 minutes before the call to mask your approach.

                    3) I like using a trigger stick bi-pod to hold the rifle still above grass and brush and to get a solid aim at those who don't come close.

                    4) They are really stupid and bold at night. Any time you can hunt full moonlight over fresh snow, you will have your best odds. They are not worried about human scent or anything for that matter at night because they typically have no fear at night.

                    5) You don't have to over call. They can remember exactly where the sound came from even if they were a mile or two away when they heard it.

                    6) Sit with at least two people to avoid the shooter having to watch his back. This reduces movement and really improves your odds. You rarely know which direction they will come. They can come out of nowhere.

                    7) If they are coming, let them keep coming. They often stop for a while at a fair distance to survey and watch. Some shooters get nervous and take a poor shot. Wait them out and give them another short squeal. They typically keep coming. I've waited to see just how close they will get and in one case actually had one put his nose on my rifle barrel to check it out. He was coming from down wind too. He was HUNGRY!

                    8) Set your call and any decoy you use as far from you as you can. They lock in on the exact location of the sound but may detect you from a distance if you are too close to the call. If the call is 30 yards away, you will see their eyes locked in on that exact piece of ground.

                    Good luck! The most important thing is getting out there and keeping #1 in mind.
                    We all seem to have our own preferences. I tear loose for about 15 seconds sounding like a miserable, pathetic rabbit that is getting its leg ripped off. I try to imagine what a desperately dying rabbit would sound like with the pain of a predator attack. They squeal so loud it kind of turns your stomach.

                    I try to envision having my leg torn off by a big scary monster. Turn up the volume with all you've got and don't spare the emotion.

                    Then I will be quiet for about 2 minutes, watching 180 degrees without moving my head or any part of my body. In most cases, they come on the run and I will see them from about a half mile away unless I am in tight cover. Two years ago, I was setting my caller down and accidentally hit the remote control hanging from my neck. It squealed loud and hard as I set it down. I stood up and grabbed for the remote control only to see a coyote coming on the full run from a timber about 400 yards away. He slammed on the brakes and ran to my right as soon as he saw me. I should have just shot him but thought I might get him back. I dropped to the ground and called again. He stopped to look back at about 600 yards but by the time I got my cross hairs on him, he disappeared in brush.

                    While wrapping up a deer hunt a few years ago, I watched my brother try a parting coyote call before we walked out. He was huddled beneath a big fallen tree watching a valley between him and a dense timber. Within a minute two big coyotes were looking down on him from over the top of the fallen tree. Their noses were about six inches from his and he was just totally out of position for a shot; they both scattered without a shot.

                    If nothing comes within a few minutes I start mixing in coyote yipping and I temper the rabbit sound down to a whimper. I've seen coyotes come in after 10 minutes but it is rare. I usually move on the next call after 10 minutes. At mid-day, I will call longer. In the middle of the night, they are usually on you within 30 seconds to a minute.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
                      It works, so:

                      1) Hunt where there are hungry coyotes. The best call and technique in the world won't work if there are no coyotes ready to feed.

                      2) Sit quiet and still for 15-20 minutes before the call to mask your approach.

                      3) I like using a trigger stick bi-pod to hold the rifle still above grass and brush and to get a solid aim at those who don't come close.

                      4) They are really stupid and bold at night. Any time you can hunt full moonlight over fresh snow, you will have your best odds. They are not worried about human scent or anything for that matter at night because they typically have no fear at night.

                      5) You don't have to over call. They can remember exactly where the sound came from even if they were a mile or two away when they heard it.

                      6) Sit with at least two people to avoid the shooter having to watch his back. This reduces movement and really improves your odds. You rarely know which direction they will come. They can come out of nowhere.

                      7) If they are coming, let them keep coming. They often stop for a while at a fair distance to survey and watch. Some shooters get nervous and take a poor shot. Wait them out and give them another short squeal. They typically keep coming. I've waited to see just how close they will get and in one case actually had one put his nose on my rifle barrel to check it out. He was coming from down wind too. He was HUNGRY!

                      8) Set your call and any decoy you use as far from you as you can. They lock in on the exact location of the sound but may detect you from a distance if you are too close to the call. If the call is 30 yards away, you will see their eyes locked in on that exact piece of ground.

                      Good luck! The most important thing is getting out there and keeping #1 in mind.
                      What state are you located in? I have always personally heard that you call for a min or two and sit quiet for like 5 min. I increase volume with each calling set then I go down with volume. I feel like you have to call really loud like that and see coyotes right away because you can see very far... Maybe I'm wrong (and that's why I haven't killed one HAHA) but I have no clue what I'm doing wrong. Do you use the deadbone caller? and what hand calls do you use?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
                        It works, so:

                        1) Hunt where there are hungry coyotes. The best call and technique in the world won't work if there are no coyotes ready to feed.

                        2) Sit quiet and still for 15-20 minutes before the call to mask your approach.

                        3) I like using a trigger stick bi-pod to hold the rifle still above grass and brush and to get a solid aim at those who don't come close.

                        4) They are really stupid and bold at night. Any time you can hunt full moonlight over fresh snow, you will have your best odds. They are not worried about human scent or anything for that matter at night because they typically have no fear at night.

                        5) You don't have to over call. They can remember exactly where the sound came from even if they were a mile or two away when they heard it.

                        6) Sit with at least two people to avoid the shooter having to watch his back. This reduces movement and really improves your odds. You rarely know which direction they will come. They can come out of nowhere.

                        7) If they are coming, let them keep coming. They often stop for a while at a fair distance to survey and watch. Some shooters get nervous and take a poor shot. Wait them out and give them another short squeal. They typically keep coming. I've waited to see just how close they will get and in one case actually had one put his nose on my rifle barrel to check it out. He was coming from down wind too. He was HUNGRY!

                        8) Set your call and any decoy you use as far from you as you can. They lock in on the exact location of the sound but may detect you from a distance if you are too close to the call. If the call is 30 yards away, you will see their eyes locked in on that exact piece of ground.

                        Good luck! The most important thing is getting out there and keeping #1 in mind.
                        I've done all my coyote hunting in South Dakota over the last 50 years. Some in thick timber situations but most in open farm fields or on the prairie. I try to find a location with good visibility because it helps. That isn't always possible though.

                        I only call for about 15-20 seconds at first because many have come aggressively in the first minute. I've used all kinds of calls but not the Deadbone. A mouth call works fine but your Deadbone will be easier. If the coyotes are hungry, any rabbit squeal gets them going. They do get trained though if lots of your neighbors are out calling a lot too. Remember that a real rabbit attacked by a predator does not follow a choreographed song. They squeal and that is all a coyote needs. I believe they can hear a two second squeal from two miles away and they don't hesitate to get there quickly.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                          I went to a FoxPro seminar and they used a two man technique in heavily coyote populated Texas. At night, one would hold the Red light and scan for the coyote and a shooter was at the ready with a shotgun. When the coyote came in, in an instant, the red lens changed to white light and the guy took the shot. Very fast action.
                          Use a shotgun with #4 Buckshot at night. They will come close. Same calling sequence as usual. Just don't overdo it. Are you sure there are coyotes in the area you are hunting? The Deadbone doesn't manufacture coyotes and neither will any other call. Coyotes are accustomed to hunting at night and that is when they are hungriest.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                            I went to a FoxPro seminar and they used a two man technique in heavily coyote populated Texas. At night, one would hold the Red light and scan for the coyote and a shooter was at the ready with a shotgun. When the coyote came in, in an instant, the red lens changed to white light and the guy took the shot. Very fast action.
                            I do believe that there are coyotes in the area. I have only a few spots to hunt. One I know there are coyotes in the area because I see a good amount of tracks, but I can only be there on the weekends. The others I have seen tracks, but I haven't seen any coyotes. One spot is a pheasant preserve which I thought would be a hot spot and I have really tried there at night, but I haven't seen anything and I think that may be because there is a lot of food so I am really interested on tips on using coyote vocals. I use a .22 LR when I hunt at night because I can get better range, it's quieter so I can possibly have a followup shot and I get more shots.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                              I went to a FoxPro seminar and they used a two man technique in heavily coyote populated Texas. At night, one would hold the Red light and scan for the coyote and a shooter was at the ready with a shotgun. When the coyote came in, in an instant, the red lens changed to white light and the guy took the shot. Very fast action.
                              If you are not seeing coyotes but seeing tracks, the main reason may be that you are scaring them on your approach. You've got to be quiet and camouflaged. Fresh tracks is a good sign but realize coyotes may range 10 miles to hunt at night so the tracks may be leaving. A pheasant farm sounds like a possibility but every pheasant farm I know aggressively snares coyotes all year round and they are the worst place to hunt because nearly all their coyotes are dead. You may see a track going in and none coming out because they are in a snare. The call sequence is the least of your problems as long as it can make a rabbit squeal for at least 2 seconds. Be quiet. Let the area settle down before you call. If no coyotes approach, go somewhere else. Calling in an area with no coyotes NEVER works; even if it is the only place you have to hunt.

                              Comment

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