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Do your deer sightings go down in early October? What's your solution?

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  • Do your deer sightings go down in early October? What's your solution?

    This is a tough time as it is pre-rut and bow season only (where I am). Patience is key and having a good stand setup over a known trail is the way to go. If you aren't going to get to the spot while it is still pre-dawn, you might as well just stay in bed.

  • #2
    Do your deer sightings go down in early October? What's your solution?

    Do your deer sightings go down in early October? What's your solution?

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    • #3
      I have found that deer have moved away from their summer patterns and are now taking advantage of cut cornfields and the food and space they provide. I shot a nice doe October 7th that was walking along a natural funnel and eating waste corn.

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      • #4
        Yes. Two things, I wake up from my nap and open my eyes usually the first step. But in the serious end to try to cut the lull is we practice alternating hunting locations to decrease our pressure. The majority of the deer we see are young fawns all throughout the day, feeding near their bedding area, but the other deer are mostly caught near the evening on cooler nights, otherwise we don't sit so we don't ruin our chances come the rut.

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        • #5
          My solution is to go fishing. It's a great time of year for salmon and brook trout. The deer hunting will be better in late October.

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          • #6
            You have to know whats going on in your area. Have the deer moved to a new food source? Have the bucks become territorial pushing other bucks out? Has it been hot and dry and deer are seeking water and shade? Have you worn out your stand location? Has the wind changed pushing deer to new trails and bedding? Could be a number of different things. Scout, Scout, Scout and not with trail cameras either. Checking SD cards pushes out the shooters and gives only a breif moment of time. I like to scout from afar with binos and spotting scopes. Seeing the deer movement gives much better detail for stand loication.

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            • #7
              Deer Sightings do definitely go down in my area, but it is not necessarily because deer movement stops. In early October deer are transitioning from their summer feeding patterns to more territorial pre-rut behavior. You aren't going to have the same bachelor groups sharing food sources. They are going to split up and migrate short distances to new areas. The first task is finding the newest and most frequented areas such as food sources, water, and bedding areas. I then pinpoint high and low spots according to terrain and topographical maps. From there it is important to pinpoint pinch points in the timber or ravines that deer travel. Warm Temperatures will affect the times of deer migration to food, water, and bedding. Couple that with the moon and wind, you may have your hands full. I strategically set up 2-4 stands according to the above factors. 1 of these will always include a stand to play a south wind (very prevalent in October around the OK panhandle) and must be between bedding areas and a food source By examining the wind direction, moon phase, and temperature it is not as difficult as it seems to spot bucks. It comes down to playing the wind and setting up early enough before sunrise to keep from alarming deer. I have seen 2 Pope and Young quality bucks in the past 3 sits. Write down all of your factors, look at a map, and the weather, then just get out there and hunt!

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              • #8
                My deer sightings do go down in early October. My solution to this problem is to stay positive and diligent. Next time you go hunting, take a small bird identification guide to pass the time to learn more about the nature you are encountering.

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                • #9
                  They sure do! I fill my deer tag and all of a sudden I am home watching football and seeing no more deer. Might have to buy a second tag to see more deer.

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                  • #10
                    Usually in Massachusetts they start to go up, but if the sightings go down, try switching it up a little. If you are in a spot and you aren't seeing deer as much try moving. Massachusetts the weather changes from hot to warm during the days and cool nights so the food changes quickly. Start hunting areas with acorns or apple trees more. Fields in the late afternoon seem to work.

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                    • #11
                      It's always slow here in early through mid October. I try not to get discouraged and enjoy the peace and quiet in the woods. I'll alternate between 3 or 4 usual stand locations and try a few new spots here or there. I'll try to find a grove of oaks dropping nuts. Ripe persimmons are also deer magnets here. If I can find early rubs and scrapes, I'll hunt'em figuring mature bucks start laying them down first. usually I'm just biding my time looking forward to November.

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                      • #12
                        I believe every hunter should have a trail camera. You see more bucks on trail cams even the ones that are nocturnal. I own four trail cams and they spot deer 24 hours a day.

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                        • #13
                          Just keep hunting. The deer can't hide forever. You will see them eventually.

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                          • #14
                            Generally they do go down here in Utah but that's just because I end up on the edge of a lake duck hunting. I figure that the family has to eat in early October.

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                            • #15
                              Do your homework. Know your food sources and place your trail cameras on the trails leading into those food sources. Acorns, alfalfa, and my favorite PUMPKINS! I've seen deer clear out an acre and a half patch of pumpkins in a matter of 2 weeks. Especially if there is a bedding area adjacent to that food source.

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