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I am doing a project on turkey hunting for school. Having never gone turkey hunting, I am not that familiar with it. What are

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  • I am doing a project on turkey hunting for school. Having never gone turkey hunting, I am not that familiar with it. What are

    I am doing a project on turkey hunting for school. Having never gone turkey hunting, I am not that familiar with it. What are some of the laws and regulations for hunting turkey?

  • #2
    I suggest you visit your local tax collector's office or sporting goods store and pick up a free copy of the hunting regulations for your state.

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    • #3
      Or go on the Department of Game and Inland fisheries website for your state, should have a link to all the regs, and regs depend on the state.

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      • #4
        Why not pick a subject you are more familiar with?

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        • #5
          For Virginia visit huntfishva.com

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          • #6
            I did not get to pick the subject. I was assigned to do the project of turkeys. I was just hoping that you guys to give me some basic information to start with.

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            • #7
              Oh man. Entire books are written about this subject every day. I suggest that you check out the turkey blog here and in other places, and that you look at various fish and game websites which explains the basics. What I am about to give you is going be the most basic overview possible.
              First, you’ll want a few quick notes on identification (this is important due to the fact that only males can be harvested in spring). Males can be distinguished from females in several ways. Female heads are usually brown to blue, while male heads are multicolored with red, white, and blue. Males are also usually larger and of a darker hue than females. Males also are the only ones who fan their tails and “puff up” in the spring mating display.
              In general, spring turkey seasons begin at any point from March to May, depending upon the latitude of the state in question (the further north you go, the later the season starts). Hunters are usually limited to around 1 or 2 birds per spring season. Spring seasons also usually limit hunters to taking only males (fall seasons allow for hens to be harvested, we’ll get to that later). Spring is mating season for the Wild Turkey, so hunting them usually goes something like this. You go out towards an area were the birds have been sleeping in the nearby trees (roosting). At first light, when you hear the male turkeys (toms) make their famous “gobble” call, you respond with call of your own designed to mimic the sound of a female turkey (hen). There are several types of turkey calls, including box, slate, push calls, and diaphragm (mouth) calls. Most hunters carry several of each type into the field. The idea is to convince the tom that you are a hen and come over toward where you are concealed. Fake decoys are sometimes used to further lure the birds towards your position. Regulations usually stipulate that you use a shotgun (rifles are legal in a few areas, but are rarely used as they are considered dangerous and unsporting to most turkey hunters), firing a relatively dense pattern of birdshot. Once the Tom is in optimal range (usually about 30-35 yards depending on shotgun load), you aim for the head and neck area and shoot. Turkeys can be surprisingly tough and will not succumb to a shot that has not destroyed either the brain or part of the spine. Bow hunting for turkeys is also common, and the setup is about the same, the only difference being that you must lure the gobbler in even closer than 30 yards for an effective shot.
              Many states have fall seasons as well as spring seasons. These are usually archery only for most of their duration (which coincides with deer season), but in some cases allow limited shotgun seasons, sometimes lasting only a few days. Mating calls do not work in this season, so hunters have to either use traditional tactics, such as finding a food source and waiting the birds out, or can undergo a complicated maneuver where the hunter finds the flock in the middle of the field and scatters them, using calls to lure birds back into shotgun range individually.
              One final note, orange clothing commonly seen in other seasons is not worn while turkey hunting. Turkeys survive mainly through their incredible eyesight, so full camouflage must be worn instead. This means that hunters must take extra caution in order to avoid accidents. Stalking turkeys for instance, rarely done, and is heavily discouraged by most F&G agencies.

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              • #8
                thank you nehunter92. That answered all of my questions.

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                • #9
                  Contact your local wildlife manager or warden at your local Dept of Natural Resources (or your state's equivalent agency) - they may be able to tell you more about the local hunting conditions/regulations and flock health. If you are interested in pursuing this topic further, they might be able to put you in contact with a turkey hunting group that sponsors youth hunts.

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                  • #10
                    For spring turkey hunting you are only allowed to shoot male turkeys. That is in Maine I'm not sure about other states.

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