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Any tips some good seasoned turkey hunters could give me? I mostly hunt deer in southern Ohio, Ive tried to go after turkeys a f

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  • Any tips some good seasoned turkey hunters could give me? I mostly hunt deer in southern Ohio, Ive tried to go after turkeys a f

    Any tips some good seasoned turkey hunters could give me? I mostly hunt deer in southern Ohio, Ive tried to go after turkeys a few times but never had any luck and never have bagged a bird. Where I hunt is loaded with turkeys. Ive gotten trail cam pics over the years of huge toms with 10" plus beards, just never can seem to find them come time to hunt. Im commited to getting atleast one bird this year though. I could defanitly use some guidance from someone who knows how to talk and think turkey to bag my first bird.

  • #2
    Turkey hunting is an art that can take sometime to be successful at. Do not get down because it hasn't happened yet.

    Spring gobbler hunting requires a lot of scouting before the season opens and throughout. Look for scratching in the leaves (leaves kicked away from feeding turkeys), listen in evenings and early mornings for gobblers using locator calls like owls, crows, or wood pecker. But be patient, as often natures own will get them gobbling for you. Don't call to him until the season is in because you can educate him to the sound and rythm of your call, making it more difficult to call him in later.

    Once you have one roosted, slip in on him before daylight. But I like to set up about 80-100 yards away. If he is gobbling in the tree, great! Let him go. If not, use your locator call to be sure he is still there. I prefer not to call until daylight. Then, I may give a few soft tree calls to let him know I am there, but usually wait until he is on the ground to get start cranking him up with excited yelps and some mixed cutting.

    Don't call too much. A lot of hunters love to hear that tom gobble and continue to call. Often times, he can get hung up out of range. I like to call just enough to keep him interested and make him come looking for you.

    In the mountains, we always want to set up equal to or higher in elevation. When the bird is above you, it will more times than not, stand up there and gobble watching and waiting for the hen to come to him. When your above him, he wont be able to see through the brush as well and so has to come find you.

    These are the ideal scenerios. Patience and improvisation will prove to be your biggest assets. Practice your calling and learn when, where, and how to use it. These lessons come only with experience.

    Sorry so long.

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    • #3
      Good job, Deer30.

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      • #4
        my advice to you would be to hook up with an experienced turkey hunter for a day or two. let him do all the calling, and let him run the hunt. just watch and pay attention to what he does. tackling turkey hunter on your own with no experience, and it seems no luck, is a daunting task.

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        • #5
          "someone who knows how to talk and think turkey to bag my first bird" thats like asking any of us how to understand women. no two turkey are the same. so you have to find a call that works. Also if turkeys could smell no one would ever kill one; they have amazing eyesight, and hearing but can't smell too well. So make sure your are camo head to toe and stay still. I agree with deer30 and scratch golf 100%. If you can find some one to show you the basics it helps a ton. From there hunt as much as possible and it will get easier. Also don't get discouraged It took me four years of fall and spring hunting most of the season to kill my first bird. They are hard to hunt especially on public land but in the end all the work is worth it. good luck

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          • #6
            Turkeys have fantastic eyes, and I would hunt a ground blind. Do not open any blind windows behind you. The light coming in from the back window will make it easy for the turkeys to see you. Primo makes a nice ground blind with plenty of room. Good Luck!

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            • #7
              Drew, I'm with you been trying for several years now. Do you hunt private land or public? I'm in Ohio as well and plan on making a trip t southern Ohio when all day hunting comes in. I'm thinking Tar Hollow and or Wayne National Forest, You have any thoughts on these two areas?

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              • #8
                @Dcast- I hunt private land in Gallia County close to the river. I dont know anything about Tar Hollow but I was out on Wayne National Behind Rio Grande last month hiking and pig hunting and their were birds everywhere out there. Its alot of land though,bring your boots and be ready to walk!

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                • #9
                  Are open fields better or Ridge tops?

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                  • #10
                    deer 30 pretty much explain it all one thing I would add is if the turkeys all of the sudden stop gobbling don't get hungry and leave around 10 1030 the toms will start to breed there hens right around there you should start making real soft yelps or maybe a kee kee by this time the gobbler will be trying to get his next of hens and will often gobble right back. but remember unless a tom is realllyyy hot stay away from loud cuts and cackles no matter what you see on tv. in the right situation those are great but that's once in a blue moon. good luck and I hope you get a beard dragger

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