Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I am going turkey hunting for the first time this year and I will be alone. Can anyone give me any hints on how to hunt them in

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I am going turkey hunting for the first time this year and I will be alone. Can anyone give me any hints on how to hunt them in

    I am going turkey hunting for the first time this year and I will be alone. Can anyone give me any hints on how to hunt them in the woods of central New Hampshire.

  • #2
    Scout. Start your hunting as soon as the snow is gone and the weather begins to warm up...in the next few weeks. The key to bagging a bird, get out before the season and scout. Don't try to call birds. Just listen and look for signs of birds and map out places to hunt when the season starts. The real key to bagging a bird is finding birds before season.

    As far as hunting, calling, etc., practice calling. Get a CD or video and listen and practice. Pattern you shotgun. Don't assume your shotgun will shoot every turkey load well.

    As far as calling a bird, every situation is different but I'm a firm believer in the theory that less calling is better. I use an owl locator call sometimes. Sometimes Il'll do a few yelps or tree calls. But, mostly I just listen for birds and try to figure out how to use terrain to get relatively close to them before calling myself. I've bagged a number of birds by making a couple of yelps and half a dozen clucks to bring them in to 20 yards. (Don't ever try to shoot a bird at a range of more than 25-30 yards. It's just asking to cripple a bird). I think over calling drives birds away. But that said, I've also spent an hour and called aggressively dozens of times to bring birds in. Every morning is different.

    If you can do a good yelp and cluck, you can hunt gobblers. Cackles, purrs, etc. have their uses but work on being good at the basics first.

    Most important, have fun. Relax and enjoy being in the woods on an early spring morning. You'll bag a bird or you won't but every day hunting is a great one.

    Comment


    • #3
      listen for gobblers roosted in the late evening or early morning and look for scratching in the leaves and you will know there are birds in the area.
      try to setup about 100 yrds from a roosted bird and don't call until daylight (or about when you first start to hear crows in the distance) and keep it soft

      once he flies down you can pick up the excitement with some excited yelps and cutting, but don't over do it. Try to call just enough to keep his interest and to keep him moving in your direction.

      Be patient, dress in full camo, and don't move. A turkey's eyes are his greatest defense.

      Good luck and have fun!

      For greater detail and additional tips, check us out at www.deer30outdoors.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I imagine the ADKs of NY have similar hunting conditions (which is where I grew up hunting turkeys). Basically, turkey densities are so low in the big woods areas of New England that if you can get one to gobble, you'll probably kill that bird. Be ready to put a lot of miles on your shoes trying to find a hot bird. The late season can be very productive.

        Comment

        Welcome!

        Collapse

        Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

        If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

        And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

        Right Rail 1

        Collapse

        Top Active Users

        Collapse

        There are no top active users.

        Right Rail 2

        Collapse

        Latest Topics

        Collapse

        Right Rail 3

        Collapse

        Footer Ad

        Collapse
        Working...
        X