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    My 1 year old chocolate lab was retrieving some training dummies and collapsed.
    We were training for about 20 minutes.
    I thought she had a stroke, i got her in the house and she couldn't get up. She tried several times but fell, the episode lasted 20 minutes.

    My black lab at 11 years old can run or swim all day.

    Have any of your dogs experienced anything like this?

    I saw online exercise induced collapse in labs.
    Last edited by Danbo; 06-30-2020, 06:30 PM.

  • #2
    I've never owned a Lab but had a Dalmatian when I was a kid. She had kidney issues and would have trouble walking when the condition flared. Are you taking her to the vet tomorrow?

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes I am she has appointment in morning.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Danbo View Post
        My chocolate lab was retrieving some training dummies and collapsed.
        We were training for about 20 minutes.
        I thought she had a stroke, i got her in the house and she couldn't get up. She tried several times but fell, the episode lasted 20 minutes.

        My black lab at 11 years old can run or swim all day.

        Have any of your dogs experienced anything like this?

        I saw online exercise induced collapse in labs.
        I saw a episode of Dr. Pol and it turned out to be selenium or B-1, Thiamine deficiency.
        Has the dog been on heart worm medicine?
        Good luck at the Vet. Hope it is something treatable.

        Comment


        • #5
          Sorry to hear that danbo. Here's hoping she recovers.
          My old rotty is pushing 10 and is beginning to show signs of his age.
          Big dogs, sometimes, just don't age well.

          Comment


          • #6
            The chocolate pup checked out ok.

            The vet didn't seem concerned, if it happens again I'll take her to different one.

            Comment


            • #7
              Sounds a lot like vestibular disease. Could be one of three causes: the "old dog" variation which has unknown cause but usually goes away on it's own within 72 hours. Second variety is due to inner ear infection. Fixed with antibiotics, etc. The third is a central nervous system obstruction. Usually a tumor or cancer. My ten year-old Lab Pearl was struck with the third kind five years ago: glioma brain cancer. She was and still is the only dog treated at U of Minnesota Vet School that recovered 100%. I was told to bring her home and help her die. Two nights later she snapped out of it. No one knows why.

              Look in your dog's eyes. If the eyeballs vibrate laterally, that is vestibular disease. If your dog crashed for several hours afterwards, it may have had an epileptic seizure but it would be unusual to see the onset so late in life.

              Strokes are very rare in dogs so I don't think that is the issue.

              Keep us posted. Good luck.

              Comment


              • #8
                Sorry you're going thru that. Hope it works out alright.

                I'm sure you can use your PC, but this seemed like a good write up:
                https://vetmed.umn.edu/research/labs...g%20has%20EIC.

                I'm sorry to say but my first thought was heart worm or red fiber disease, but neither of those really fit here, so that's a good sign. If your pup wants to play and exercise and isn't lethargic, it's probably not a sign of a heart condition.

                I'd look at the section about differentiating it from other similar conditions, you might want to try what you can to see if you personally can eliminate some of these other possibilities. I'd say start with Hyperthermia first. If your pup is breathing too fast and hard or her body temp is too high you'd have pretty good evidence.

                I say trust your gut on the vet. How hard would it be to ask you to run your pup out for 15-20min? The vet could have seen another animal while she let you go out back for fetch with the pup and worked her out for 15-20min to see if it induced another episode. Though to be fair to the vet, he/she might think it's a type of epilepsy.
                https://vetmed.umn.edu/research/labs...mal-dyskinesia

                If it does turn out to be a form of epilepsy, CBD has been shown to reduce or eliminate symptoms very well in dogs. If the symptoms get worse, you might try buying a small bottle and giving her a couple of droppers full to see if she improves any. Be careful when purchasing, lots of shysters out there trying to pass-off hemp oil as CBD. They're not the same, and I don't want you to waste your money.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Another thing to keep in mind is if you're playing with your dog in a public place, it may pick up a roach and eat it. Apparently dogs love weed ... but it DOES NOT like dogs. Produces the stroke like symptoms you are describing. Bad effects usually pass.

                  Again, I would be surprised if this is epilepsy given that the dog is eleven years old. Onset is usually before age three.

                  It could also be the same soil cholitis bacteria that almost wiped out my young Lab Ellie last summer.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
                    Another thing to keep in mind is if you're playing with your dog in a public place, it may pick up a roach and eat it. Apparently dogs love weed ... but it DOES NOT like dogs. Produces the stroke like symptoms you are describing. Bad effects usually pass.

                    Again, I would be surprised if this is epilepsy given that the dog is eleven years old. Onset is usually before age three.

                    It could also be the same soil cholitis bacteria that almost wiped out my young Lab Ellie last summer.
                    The incident happened to my 1 year old chocolate lab after 15 minutes of playing.Sorry for the confusion. My black lab is 11 and she is very heathy.

                    We were in my backyard not a public place. After the incident she was back to normal. I'm still worried about her.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Danbo View Post

                      The incident happened to my 1 year old chocolate lab after 15 minutes of playing.Sorry for the confusion. My black lab is 11 and she is very heathy.

                      We were in my backyard not a public place. After the incident she was back to normal. I'm still worried about her.
                      As well you should be!
                      That AIN'T normal.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post

                        As well you should be!
                        That AIN'T normal.
                        Sounds like epilepsy. We had a chocolate Lab that developed epilepsy about age two. She lived to age fourteen. We never had her medicated. Sophie would have a grand mal seizure on average about once every six months. They were very disturbing to watch but she weathered them well. It was important that I hold her and talk to her during the seizure and afterwards till she was fully out of it or she could get up and panic and trigger a second one. It was easy enough to tell when she was ready to be released. Her eyes dilated during the seizure and, of course, her heart raced (tachycardia occurs 100% of the time during generalized tonic clonic seizures). If it sounds like I'm a know-it-all ... it should. Epilepsy runs consistently through my wife's family and it took my lovely fourteen year-old son ten years ago last Christmas. I am still involved in an ongoing huge malpractice litigation over his death.

                        Epilepsy is perhaps the worst genetic problem for Labs and golden retrievers these days, hip dysplasia having almost become a thing of the past. Phenobarbital is the drug of choice for canine treatment but it is hard on them. Often damaging for liver or kidneys. We didn't treat Sophie because the seizures were so infrequent. Medication probably would have been harder on her than the seizures. Oh, for sure. You should get your dog in to the vet. Period. At this point the vet will probably just tell you to watch for further symptoms. Even people are rarely treated with meds until they have had at least two seizures. Keep in mind that most generalized seizures occur at night so keep the dog somewhere close when you go to bed. It will often come and tell you if it's ready to have a seizure. Sophie always slept in the other room and would come running and bowl the door open. Then we knew she was in trouble. Like people, dogs will usually lose their bowels during a seizure. It's not much fun to be holding a dog that's pooping. But you know she would do it for you. Try to live by the Golden Rule, especially for dogs that know nothing but loyalty and love.

                        If the vet suspects seizures he should give you valium or lorazipam emergency meds. These are usually inserted rectally (NEVER put your fingers in the mouth of a person or animal in a seizure ... unless you want to lose your fingers!). Emergency med is only administered if the seizure is prolonged. I believe that would be a half hour or more but check with the vet. Sophie had several that lasted fifteen or twenty minutes but most were over in about five. Though you may want to "help" the dog by inserting the med immediately, keep in mind they lose their bowels so it would just get pooped out.

                        Also keep in mind that not all seizures are full blown tonic clonic. Watch for your dog to get suddenly "spacey" and then snap back to reality (eyes will often momentarily dilate). Or it may fall down flat, eyes wide open, and then pop right back up ready to go like nothing happened. Watch for uncontrolled mouth movements that come and go. All these are symptoms of partial seizures. Don't worry about any thing Jekyll and Hyde. The dog's personality will not change during or after seizures. They usually become lethargic for a couple of hours after a generalized seizure. It's good to keep an eye on them during this "post-ictal state" because that's when recurring seizures often happen.

                        And finally, like children, young dogs can outgrown their epilepsy. So even if it was a seizure, it may not be anything to get excited about at this stage. YOU NEED TO CONSULT A VET and I'm a bit concerned that you haven't done that yet. If the dog has another seizure I would think the vet would recommend an MRI of head to ensure there is not a tumour. I would be surprised if that is recommended at this point.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

                          Sounds like epilepsy. We had a chocolate Lab that developed epilepsy about age two. She lived to age fourteen. We never had her medicated. Sophie would have a grand mal seizure on average about once every six months. They were very disturbing to watch but she weathered them well. It was important that I hold her and talk to her during the seizure and afterwards till she was fully out of it or she could get up and panic and trigger a second one. It was easy enough to tell when she was ready to be released. Her eyes dilated during the seizure and, of course, her heart raced (tachycardia occurs 100% of the time during generalized tonic clonic seizures). If it sounds like I'm a know-it-all ... it should. Epilepsy runs consistently through my wife's family and it took my lovely fourteen year-old son ten years ago last Christmas. I am still involved in an ongoing huge malpractice litigation over his death.

                          Epilepsy is perhaps the worst genetic problem for Labs and golden retrievers these days, hip dysplasia having almost become a thing of the past. Phenobarbital is the drug of choice for canine treatment but it is hard on them. Often damaging for liver or kidneys. We didn't treat Sophie because the seizures were so infrequent. Medication probably would have been harder on her than the seizures. Oh, for sure. You should get your dog in to the vet. Period. At this point the vet will probably just tell you to watch for further symptoms. Even people are rarely treated with meds until they have had at least two seizures. Keep in mind that most generalized seizures occur at night so keep the dog somewhere close when you go to bed. It will often come and tell you if it's ready to have a seizure. Sophie always slept in the other room and would come running and bowl the door open. Then we knew she was in trouble. Like people, dogs will usually lose their bowels during a seizure. It's not much fun to be holding a dog that's pooping. But you know she would do it for you. Try to live by the Golden Rule, especially for dogs that know nothing but loyalty and love.

                          If the vet suspects seizures he should give you valium or lorazipam emergency meds. These are usually inserted rectally (NEVER put your fingers in the mouth of a person or animal in a seizure ... unless you want to lose your fingers!). Emergency med is only administered if the seizure is prolonged. I believe that would be a half hour or more but check with the vet. Sophie had several that lasted fifteen or twenty minutes but most were over in about five. Though you may want to "help" the dog by inserting the med immediately, keep in mind they lose their bowels so it would just get pooped out.

                          Also keep in mind that not all seizures are full blown tonic clonic. Watch for your dog to get suddenly "spacey" and then snap back to reality (eyes will often momentarily dilate). Or it may fall down flat, eyes wide open, and then pop right back up ready to go like nothing happened. Watch for uncontrolled mouth movements that come and go. All these are symptoms of partial seizures. Don't worry about any thing Jekyll and Hyde. The dog's personality will not change during or after seizures. They usually become lethargic for a couple of hours after a generalized seizure. It's good to keep an eye on them during this "post-ictal state" because that's when recurring seizures often happen.

                          And finally, like children, young dogs can outgrown their epilepsy. So even if it was a seizure, it may not be anything to get excited about at this stage. YOU NEED TO CONSULT A VET and I'm a bit concerned that you haven't done that yet. If the dog has another seizure I would think the vet would recommend an MRI of head to ensure there is not a tumour. I would be surprised if that is recommended at this point.
                          Thanks for the info honk. I did take her to a vet and they did a check up on her . The vet wasn't concerned.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Apparently a simple DNA test can be used to test for EIC. I dunno, $60 is not exactly cheap, but it seems like it would be worth it just for the info it could give you or the vet. There's a chance it could completely rule it out or confirm it.
                            https://dnacenter.com/testing-pets-v...-collapse-eic/

                            Did you get your pup from a breeder? Were the Dam or the Sire tested for it?


                            If it does turn out to be epilepsy, CBD with no THC seems to be really helpful.
                            https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0521101450.htm

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Buckshott00 View Post
                              Apparently a simple DNA test can be used to test for EIC. I dunno, $60 is not exactly cheap, but it seems like it would be worth it just for the info it could give you or the vet. There's a chance it could completely rule it out or confirm it.
                              https://dnacenter.com/testing-pets-v...-collapse-eic/

                              Did you get your pup from a breeder? Were the Dam or the Sire tested for it?


                              If it does turn out to be epilepsy, CBD with no THC seems to be really helpful.
                              https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0521101450.htm
                              This the first I have heard of EIC genetic testing. I'll talk to my vet about it but sounds rather suspicious.

                              Comment

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