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whats the most successful technique for hunting foxes?

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  • whats the most successful technique for hunting foxes?

    whats the most successful technique for hunting foxes?

  • #2
    Usually a call and decoy. They are sly.

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    • #3
      You'll need a pack of foxhounds and a good jumping horse.
      Tally ho!

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      • #4
        I've had a good deal of fun pushing them out of cover with a gundog; being part of a crew driving them out of cover towards a line of guns,and on the line with them being driven towards us; spotlighting; and calling. Some I've simply bumped into while hunting other stuff, and sometimes I've just been sitting in camp when one has wandered in looking for a free feed.

        Of all of these getting a crew together for a drive is probably the most successful for killing numbers, but you need people and organisation. Spotlighting (provided it is legal where you are) is also very successful.



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        • #5
          They come to a call pretty well but my favorite is to spot new dens in late January and plot them on a map. You will see fresh dirt on the snow. I like to find a couple dozen new dens and then drive around in the first two weeks of February with a good rifle. You will see them sitting on the dens most of the day. On the prairie you have to be ready for long shots though. They will range from 200 to 500 yards or so.

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          • #6
            I don't know if anyone does it anymore, but some mountain folks used to run them with one or two hounds. They'd just go out on a day with fresh snowfall, cut a track, let the dog go, then try to get around to where they thought the fox would run through. Blueticks and black-and-tans were popular breeds. I had a great-uncle who did it before my time, and I've read about it. Problem nowadays, I imagine, is the lack of space; you'd either need to be in a big tract of state or national forest, own a ton of land yourself, or have permission to hunt several adjoining properties.

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            • #7
              Look for them out hunting in the open on a warm, sunny day after a snowfall. Spotlight them if legal. Otherwise, catch them in the open at dusk or dawn heading back to their den. They are often nocturnal. Calling can be effective, but you only get one chance.

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