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What would be a good breed of dog for training to blood trail deer, hunt rabbits, shed antlers, etc. basically an all around sports dog that could both retrieve and track.

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  • What would be a good breed of dog for training to blood trail deer, hunt rabbits, shed antlers, etc. basically an all around sports dog that could both retrieve and track.

    What would be a good breed of dog for training to blood trail deer, hunt rabbits, shed antlers, etc. basically an all around sports dog that could both retrieve and track.

  • #2
    How much money do you want to spend?

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    • #3
      As fair as I know your looking for a Wonder Dog and So would others, Labs can do just so much and Training will cost you for more.

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      • #4
        A bloodybeaglerador retriever sounds like the dog you're after.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Treestand View Post
          As fair as I know your looking for a Wonder Dog and So would others, Labs can do just so much and Training will cost you for more.
          If it comes to be I plan to train it myself.

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          • #6
            So you can find dogs capable of doing all of that, but by breed they're going to be stronger at somethings than others. If you want to blood trail, find sheds and hunt rabbits, hard to be beat a hound; especially a beagle. A lot of beagles instinctually run rabbits in circles. They absolutely will retrieve birds for you, but hounds are hella more head strong-willed / bull headed than other sporting breeds. I won't train another hound without an e-collar. I don't mind independence, but "Come Now!" is a 100% must be obeyed command, and you don't give commands you can't enforce.

            Anyway, if you get a hound dog you'll want to work on soft-mouth and returning to your hand. My families' labs always wanted to drop stuff at my feet, our hounds never wanted to let go of the stuff they brought me.

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            • #7
              For most scent-detection purposes, one breed is as good as another.
              It is only for specific tasks that particular breeds stand out, like bloodhounds (ground scent) and pointing dogs (air scent).
              JMO.

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              • #8
                look into the blackmouth cur. ive heard good things on its capabilities, and it appears to be an under-rated/ relatively unknown breed. it also has a longer than normal lifespan and decent track record with health problems.

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                • #9
                  When I was young we used a beagle (all we had) for pheasant and rabbits. She did remarkably good since we really did not know what we were doing.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
                    For most scent-detection purposes, one breed is as good as another.
                    It is only for specific tasks that particular breeds stand out, like bloodhounds (ground scent) and pointing dogs (air scent).
                    JMO.
                    you are kinda looking for a wonder dog that doesn't exist. i think drathaars are used in germany to blood trail big game. they can retrieve and point too. probably won't hunt rabbits in the traditional sense. or you could buy a lab and a beagle

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
                      For most scent-detection purposes, one breed is as good as another.
                      It is only for specific tasks that particular breeds stand out, like bloodhounds (ground scent) and pointing dogs (air scent).
                      JMO.
                      wisc14 - I think you meant to post your comment as an answer.

                      My late uncle once lost a wounded deer, gave up on tracking it, and came back with his Gordon Setter. The dog found the deer in a matter of minutes. It had managed to hide in some heavy brush. You don't need a bloodhound or wonder dog to track a wounded deer.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Treestand View Post
                        As fair as I know your looking for a Wonder Dog and So would others, Labs can do just so much and Training will cost you for more.
                        habben97 Have at it...and Bless your Cotton Socks!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by asrenstrom View Post
                          look into the blackmouth cur. ive heard good things on its capabilities, and it appears to be an under-rated/ relatively unknown breed. it also has a longer than normal lifespan and decent track record with health problems.
                          you beat me to it

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                          • #14
                            Three breeds come to mind.
                            The beagle is a superb tracker but I don't know about the shed thing.
                            The black mouth cur is supposedly a very quite, slow working dog, therefore easy to follow on a blood trail.
                            Then the GSP! Beautiful dogs! ...but they ARE bird dogs! (space cadets!) LOL!

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                            • #15
                              My friend had a bloodhound that was awesome at tracking wounded deer. He would follow the blood right to the deer. The only bad thing about bloodhounds is they slobber and drool all the time.

                              My second photo is a bloodhound coffee cup.
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