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Are you going to try the new Core-Lokt Tipped bullets?

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  • #31
    I won't be trying them. I make custom ammo for each of my rifles and don't use factory ammo. I shoot bullets that are good for both short range and long range shooting and consider this bullet to be a slow velocity, short range bullet that does too much meat damage. I load the good old Hornady Interlock for hunting out to 300 yards and that still seems to perform the best for me. Most of my rifles use high B.C. long range bullets so I am not limiting my longer range capability.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

      Does the 7mm line of bullets still hold the highest B.C.?
      In general, the larger the caliber of the bullet, the higher B.C. potential it has. The B.C. of a very low drag (VLD) 7mm bullet looks pretty good until you compare it to a .375 caliber VLD bullet for example. The length and contour of the bullet have a lot to do with the B.C. so as you increase the caliber diameter, you have the potential to increase the length as well. The flat based contour of the new Rem bullet negatively impacts its B.C. as opposed to a boat tail type contour.

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      • #33
        Well said!

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        • #34
          Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

          In general, the larger the caliber of the bullet, the higher B.C. potential it has. The B.C. of a very low drag (VLD) 7mm bullet looks pretty good until you compare it to a .375 caliber VLD bullet for example. The length and contour of the bullet have a lot to do with the B.C. so as you increase the caliber diameter, you have the potential to increase the length as well. The flat based contour of the new Rem bullet negatively impacts its B.C. as opposed to a boat tail type contour.
          Before computers, how did you calculate the surface area of the bullet ? Also, any idea how much a bullet heats up at super sonic speeds ? My Chronograph uses radar to detect the bullet but didn't Hornady used FLIR to see the heat signature over distance of the bullet and that revelation let to the heat resistant tips ?

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          • #35
            I didn't worry about surface area or heat.
            Develop a good load at 100.
            Check for accuracy at further distances.
            Put in the variables for the technology I had at the time, and then go out and actually shoot and confirms drops, past the distances I would use at.
            The real key to distance shooting is actually proving your mat/computer based drops through shooting, to get accurate drops.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

              Before computers, how did you calculate the surface area of the bullet ? Also, any idea how much a bullet heats up at super sonic speeds ? My Chronograph uses radar to detect the bullet but didn't Hornady used FLIR to see the heat signature over distance of the bullet and that revelation let to the heat resistant tips ?
              Jim, what formula are you using that requires surface area and not cross-sectional area?

              Ballistic coefficient - Wikipedia
              "Variations in BC claims for exactly the same projectiles can be explained by differences in the ambient air density used to compute specific values or differing range-speed measurements on which the stated G1 BC averages are based. Also, the BC changes during a projectile's flight, and stated BCs are always averages for particular range-speed regimes. Further explanation about the variable nature of a projectile's G1 BC during flight can be found at the external ballistics article. The external ballistics article implies that knowing how a BC was determined is almost as important as knowing the stated BC value itself.

              External ballistics - Wikipedia
              "
              The initial rise in the BC value is attributed to a projectile's always present yaw and precession out of the bore. The test results were obtained from many shots not just a single shot.
              ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              Here's one study of bullet temp in flight. The AK rounds averaged 63 degC (145 degF) and the .308 averaged 67 degC (153 degF)

              Sensors | Free Full-Text | Temperature Measurement of a Bullet in Flight (mdpi.com)

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              • #37
                "... Here's one study of bullet temp in flight. The AK rounds averaged 63 degC (145 degF) and the .308 averaged 67 degC (153 degF) ..."

                Is this where the term, "hot lead" originated? LOL!

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

                  Before computers, how did you calculate the surface area of the bullet ? Also, any idea how much a bullet heats up at super sonic speeds ?
                  We used slide rules and logarithm tables for calculating ballistics in the old days. However, it took days to do what we can do today within seconds. Much less was known about long range shooting 50 years ago. We didn't even have the G7 ballistics contour.

                  As far as temperature, bullets do get hot, that's for sure. Long ago a 180g 30 caliber bullet hit me in the boot and bounced off. I saw a flash of it spinning on the ice ahead of me as it slid into my foot. It was probably fired from a rifle miles away because I never heard the shot. It bounced off my boot and continued spinning like a top. I went to pick it up and it felt almost as hot as boiling water.

                  Like Ernie, I never took the time to calculate ballistics. I simply developed my best load and tested it at each 100 yard interval out to 1000 yards. I wrote down the holdover and windage data and used it for long range shooting. I really wasn't able to rely on long range ballistics calculations until about 20 years ago and they have gotten a lot better in the last 10 years with improvements in optics, barrels, bullets, weather analysis and ballistics calculators.

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                  • #39
                    As mentioned, you don't need any technology info(BC/MV/calculators or even slide rules) to develop a hardened drop chart once you find a good load.
                    It does take shooting (as mentioned) and writing down your drops as you shoot in different distances and conditions. This should be done more than one time, even with all the technology we have today to get a hardened drop chart.
                    Out 400 yards or so many cartridges have a similar trajectory.
                    That is why the ballistic reticles were fairly accurate or useful, if you put in the time at the range to actually confirm your drops.

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                    • #40
                      FYI, B.C. changes with temperature, humidity and air pressure. To give you an idea, in my last 600 yard F-Class club match I shot the first 20 round target in 65 degree weather with medium humidity. I shot the last target in 95 degree weather with high humidity. The bullets impacted the target going 70 fps faster in the last target (the bullet loses less velocity in hot, humid atmosphere). They impacted the target about 3 inches higher than in the first target.

                      The amount of heat that a bullet generates is affected by its weight vs bore size and its velocity through the bore. For example, the chart shown by PigHunter demonstrates relatively low heat for big, slow bullets. However, if you were to take overbore bullets like a 90g .220 Swift bullet, the heat could reach 1000 degrees. Two weeks ago, were were testing a 90g bullet in a .223 Rem going almost 3000 fps in a 4-groove 30 inch barrel. The lead in the bullet was melted by the time it reached the muzzle so I know it was at least 621.5 degrees Fahreneit. We saw the lead splatter about 50 yards downfield and the cup hit about 70 yards downfield. That same bullet is deadly accurate at 600 yards at that same speed in a 30" 5R barrel.

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                      • #41
                        I would try them if I had been shooting something that didn’t work well. I’ll be sticking with my tried and true Barnes TTSX and LRX bullets in my hunting hand loads. Not wanting to burn primers and powder fooling with new loads even if component boolits were available.

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