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  • Field judging does

    We know I joined the club. Well this new deer size rules. I’ll sum it up 15” out side spread no big deal 8 and 10 point depending on what price of property. But then they added 70lbs doe weight minimum. I know how to tell the difference between a button buck and a doe head shape and size. And other tips I don’t know. Any help would be great. I think we are asking for trouble. Just my thoughts thank you in advance.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Milldawg View Post
    We know I joined the club. Well this new deer size rules. I’ll sum it up 15” out side spread no big deal 8 and 10 point depending on what price of property. But then they added 70lbs doe weight minimum. I know how to tell the difference between a button buck and a doe head shape and size. And other tips I don’t know. Any help would be great. I think we are asking for trouble. Just my thoughts thank you in advance.
    Uhhmmm...? Guess you better set a digital scale near your feeder and don't shoot one until it's been weighed! LOL!

    Question:
    Are we speaking "live" weight or "field dressed" weight?

    I'm not familiar with the deer herd in your area, but a doe of 70 pounds or less, too me, really isn't worth the ammo ... unless you're just absolutely starving!

    Kinda sounds they're trying to protect early fawns and yearlings.

    I have NO idea how to tell you to "judge" the weight of a doe!🤔
    I've taken some small deer, but I can't think of but 2 that "may" have weighed less than 70 pounds field dressed and one of those was camp meat.

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    • #3
      Well, I'm in the Midwest and our deer are pretty big in general. I've found that does are easier to judge "mature" vs "immature" by the length of their snouts. Young ones have a very triangular profile, short-nosed. A mature doe has a longer, more cylindrical profile, if that's such a thing.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Amflyer View Post
        Well, I'm in the Midwest and our deer are pretty big in general. I've found that does are easier to judge "mature" vs "immature" by the length of their snouts. Young ones have a very triangular profile, short-nosed. A mature doe has a longer, more cylindrical profile, if that's such a thing.
        I've heard that, amflyer. An older doe has a "longish" head.
        Oddly, I've also heard that the older a buck gets, the more blunt and short his head appears. 🤔?
        I don't think it's just Oklahoma, but I've not had a problem finding a big, meaty doe.

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        • #5
          It is response to young deer getting shot. You can generally tell the size difference between young and old. Just thought I’d ask.
          Last edited by Milldawg; 07-03-2020, 02:36 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post

            I've heard that, amflyer. An older doe has a "longish" head.
            Oddly, I've also heard that the older a buck gets, the more blunt and short his head appears. 🤔?
            I don't think it's just Oklahoma, but I've not had a problem finding a big, meaty doe.
            It’s because his neck has gotten bigger.

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            • #7
              Yeah, button bucks are probably the main reason for the rule. Fawns are usually pretty easy to pick out on their own, but if you aren't sure just don't shoot one that's alone or with another that appears to be a twin.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
                Yeah, button bucks are probably the main reason for the rule. Fawns are usually pretty easy to pick out on their own, but if you aren't sure just don't shoot one that's alone or with another that appears to be a twin.
                Yep kind of what I have always done. It seems the club has dreams of growing trophy deer. That’s not really my thing. Sure antlers are nice but they don’t make stew worth a damn. I think they might be getting a little full of themselves. I could see if we were in the Midwest letting them grow. But we are in the hills of Tennessee. Not exactly big deer country.

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                • #9
                  I believe you said there were different locations with different restrictions.
                  I'd probably hunt one of the areas with the least restrictions.

                  I don't always like state or federal regulations, but when Joe Bob wants to start tossing out rules and regs above and beyond the state, I start getting a bit edgy.

                  Guy I worked with hunted a lease with some of those "good ol' boy" rules.
                  One of the other hunters killed a deer and delivered it to the processor before anyone else in camp saw it!
                  Eric was madder than a wet hen and even quizzed the processor trying to catch the guy breaking "lease" rules.
                  Processor just told him, "I don't take illegal deer!"

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                  • #10
                    Rules are why I gave up on the merry band style of hunting. Here's an example. Many years back a bunch of guys came up here every fall from Windsor, Ontario to hunt moose in the same area my buddy and I hunted. In fact, my first bull (see attached) was one of their messes I cleaned up: the camp leader had grazed it with a very poor shot three days before. They all belonged to the same Down East right wing "shouter" religious cult and all worked for the camp boss's contracting firm. My buddy, who unlike me was quite gregarious, wanted to join the group but I was hesitant. Camp boss had an ATV (rare in those days) and he called the shots. Needless to say he also shot almost all the moose, including filling anyone else's tag if he didn't draw one. Anyway, the moose I cleaned up was one he hit on a Sunday "scouting" mission. Yet by his sacred declaration there was to be no hunting on Sundays ... except by him it seems. The next year as they were driving in the last leg to set up camp they encountered a very fine bull standing just off the road. Brice, who had been coming with them for ten years drew the tag that year. Still hadn't shot his first moose. But oh no, he can't shoot it on a Sunday or he'll be expelled from camp (and his job no doubt) by the exulted disciple of Christ. True to form, camp boss later filled Brice's tag that year. We stopped in for lunch a week later and got the sad story. As I was walking back to the vehicle I noticed a dead owl thrown on the woodpile. "What happened there?" Oh, Frank shot it yesterday. "Why?" Well, they kill grouse. "Uh ... so do you. Maybe you better not turn your back on him?" That was enough for me. Then two years later I get a phone call. "Hey, did you draw a cow tag this year?" No, I never put in for them. "Know anyone who does have one?" Okay, I know where this is going. Don't say another word. It becomes a chargeable offence for me if I know there's been a violation and don't report it. They called my buddy and his sister had a cow tag. She agreed to go take the animal shot "by mistake." What was left of it. Camp boss had tried to hide the carcass with branches etc. which only provided a convenient perch for birds to ruin it. He should have hung up an orange vest. I never had anything to do with that bunch afterwards. Last time I saw them was several years later when they went tearing through my hunting camp on their ATVs before light one morning as I was standing outside my tent. These are the same guys who pitch their camp in the middle of the road so no one can access cutting units behind it. Ran into Frank the owl poacher in a grocery store the next year. He had left the bunch. Told me that camp boss shot total of three cow moose "by mistake" over the years. Besides his house building business the jerk also ran a big elk farm operation. Pleased to know he eventually lost his shirt on that deal when the province summarily shut down all that crap due to CWD.
                    Click image for larger version  Name:	Pat__1992_moose.jpg Views:	0 Size:	90.5 KB ID:	737892
                    Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 07-04-2020, 11:44 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Honk I don’t think it’s near that bad. They just want big deer. These rules were agreed upon by 35 members present at the meeting early this year. They also set up a five member board. For what I don’t know only one guy writes the check. But anyways.

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                      • #12
                        A lot of hunting clubs in Alabama have restrictive rules and they have successfully pushed some through the state wildlife board and now we have to deal with antler restrictions public land.
                        Trump 2020 - Keep America Great!

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                        • #13
                          Qdma is a curse and a blessing

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                          • #14
                            The unit I live in has had a three point rule for a number of years now, we were one of the expanded units after the initial pilot program for few near us. The DEC had advised the state NOT to expand them until they had a few years worth of data and feedback but the state went ahead anyway, squeaky wheels got the grease. I wasn't, and still aren't, a fan of mandatory restrictions.

                            Yes we have a few older deer than we had before, but killing one is still pretty rare. Instead of fork horns you see a bunch of 2 1/2 year old 8's about 14" wide get taken. Maybe 5-10 lbs more meat on them. I suppose a few legal 1 1/2 year olds get a pass due to uncertainty but not the majority, so the bucks that are prone to grow decent antlers still get popped young. The push to go statewide got scrapped, now the state "encourages" hunters to let the young ones walk. As far as I know they won't repeal the restrictions in our area. Kids 12-15 are exempt, but I'd say more than half the people who take Hunter's Ed each year are older than that.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Milldawg View Post
                              Qdma is a curse and a blessing
                              Yeah, it's all about what's good for the wall, not what's good for the herd. Any deer smart enough to avoid getting shot is the one that is best for the herd, not stupid ones that get a pass simply because their antlers are not big enough.

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