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What is the CWD situation where you hunt?

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  • What is the CWD situation where you hunt?

    I know some guys who pretty much gave up deer hunting over the complicated CWD rules. Where i current reside, it is a CWD hotspot. The nearest clear area is 80 miles away. I may take the camper and winter hunt.

  • #2
    Right now, CWD has only been detected in a small area up on the Kansas border.
    Down here along the Red River, we're good, right now!

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    • #3
      Here in the eastern panhandle of WV CWD is a problem. There are 8 counties where you can't feed or bait deer or put anything out that deer may eat. 4 of the counties you have to debone the meat to transport it out of the county. You can't transport a whole deer outside any of those 4 counties.

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      • #4
        So far Alabama is clear but CWD has been found just across the state line into Mississippi.

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        • #5
          Here in Michigan CWD is a big problem in several counties, and the entire State has been placed on a no baiting basis. However, I have heard some hunters who have claimed they will not abide by the ruling, and if too many feel the same way, things are not looking too good for any improvement !

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          • #6
            Maryland CWD has been found in the far Western counties. These counties boarder West Virginia and Pennsylvania

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            • #7
              Here is a map of Country and you can search legislation, current year news and by State.

              http://cwd-info.org/map-chronic-wast...north-america/

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              • #8
                Two years ago I happened to run into a game warden on the day CWD was officially recognized as having entered Montana from Wyoming. A deer was confirmed near Red Lodge. He told me that they were pretty sure it had been coming across the border from Saskatchewan which was being hit hard. He admitted (with not well disguised disgust) the regional office was dragging its feet investigating just because they didn't want to be the first to have the disease (afraid what that could do to local businesses depending on out-of-state hunters). Last year two districts immediately north of where I hunt there required mandatory checking of carcasses. It's pretty much an honour system and I know some of the local anti-government types are not cooperating. Pea-brained morons! Afraid the FWP will close their favourite district if they find too many CWD deer. Well, duh! The alternative is for the danged disease to wipe out the entire state's herd.

                As far as I know we haven't had any problems with it here. But our deer herd is relatively remote. It is possible for CWD to work its way up the shore of Lake Superior from Minnesota but that's a fairly narrow corridor. It would certainly help if the state of Minnesota banned idiot cottagers along the lake from feeding deer. Gad, driving the highway to Grand Marais is running the gauntlet, especially at night. Fortunately the rougher terrain and public hunting on mostly crown land this side of the border narrows the corridor considerably.
                Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 10-21-2019, 10:56 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by RockySquirrel_2 View Post
                  I know some guys who pretty much gave up deer hunting over the complicated CWD rules. Where i current reside, it is a CWD hotspot. The nearest clear area is 80 miles away. I may take the camper and winter hunt.
                  The only rule I am familiar with is mandatory checking. In some places I understand an animal cannot be transported out of the infected district without being butchered first and all brain/spinal material removed. In many states, Montana included, no deer can be transported across the border whole. Again, spinal/brain tissue must be removed. Hunters wishing to keep horns must either remove them from the skull or have a taxidermist prepare Euro mount ... or a shoulder mount which obviously would have to be shipped back. To the best of my knowledge no states require mandatory reporting and inspection of deer parts being brought in. The customs people at the border the last two years have taken a quick look at mine and waved me through (2017 Euro skull and 2018 skull cap).

                  For my African stuff I will have to obtain a customs broker in Toronto where the horns will land in the country. Agricultural inspectors and border folks will look at them there for bugs/disease and possible contraband. I certainly hope they don't go drilling holes in my horns like they did for two of my partner's racks last year. At least they were nice enough to drill into the back side where it wouldn't be visible on the wall. I'm sure they were checking to make sure the cores underneath the horns visible on X-ray were not filled with drugs. Which is fine with me. I'd strip naked crossing borders and getting on planes if it would help stop drug traffic. I've seen that crap ruin too many families. I kinda feel the same way about the war on CWD. Whatever it takes, I'm on board 100%.
                  Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 10-21-2019, 10:59 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

                    The only rule I am familiar with is mandatory checking. In some places I understand an animal cannot be transported out of the infected district without being butchered first and all brain/spinal material removed. In many states, Montana included, no deer can be transported across the border whole. Again, spinal/brain tissue must be removed. Hunters wishing to keep horns must either remove them from the skull or have a taxidermist prepare Euro mount ... or a shoulder mount which obviously would have to be shipped back. To the best of my knowledge no states require mandatory reporting and inspection of deer parts being brought in. The customs people at the border the last two years have taken a quick look at mine and waved me through (2017 Euro skull and 2018 skull cap).

                    For my African stuff I will have to obtain a customs broker in Toronto where the horns will land in the country. Agricultural inspectors and border folks will look at them there for bugs/disease and possible contraband. I certainly hope they don't go drilling holes in my horns like they did for two of my partner's racks last year. At least they were nice enough to drill into the back side where it wouldn't be visible on the wall. I'm sure they were checking to make sure the cores underneath the horns visible on X-ray were not filled with drugs. Which is fine with me. I'd strip naked crossing borders and getting on planes if it would help stop drug traffic. I've seen that crap ruin too many families. I kinda feel the same way about the war on CWD. Whatever it takes, I'm on board 100%.
                    In N.Y. there was mandatory testing in certain Counties but that has been discontinued. In Michigan I have had mandatory deer check but that was more for DNA and following herd paternity statistics to monitor in-breeding. There was an outbreak of TB so they only allow a bushel basket size bait pile. No more 10' high piles where deer feed all night long. They wanted to cut down on nose to nose exposure time. Only case in Ohio is on a deer farm and is quarantined.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

                      In N.Y. there was mandatory testing in certain Counties but that has been discontinued. In Michigan I have had mandatory deer check but that was more for DNA and following herd paternity statistics to monitor in-breeding. There was an outbreak of TB so they only allow a bushel basket size bait pile. No more 10' high piles where deer feed all night long. They wanted to cut down on nose to nose exposure time. Only case in Ohio is on a deer farm and is quarantined.
                      No bait piles during hunting season here. Montana has a better solution: no feeding wild animals at any time anywhere. No salt blocks either. Of course anything the critters ingest during the course of routine agriculture/gardening is unavoidable. But those apples better be under the tree, not piled alongside a game trail somewhere. Keep wild animals wild.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sarge01 View Post
                        Here in the eastern panhandle of WV CWD is a problem. There are 8 counties where you can't feed or bait deer or put anything out that deer may eat. 4 of the counties you have to debone the meat to transport it out of the county. You can't transport a whole deer outside any of those 4 counties.
                        The DNR has checking stations set up in the 4 counties that CWD hit the hardest and all deer must be checked there and the DNR takes samples of each deer. The only thing that I question is that they say feeding puts the deer too close together however if you ever watch deer they lick each other all the time in groups.

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                        • #13
                          I kinda agree on the bait "pile" thing.
                          Yes, I use a feeder. I'd wager it doesn't disperse more than 1.5 to 2 cups per run.
                          I'm not trying to feed/fatten the deer, just offer them a snack.
                          One deer would starve to death on what my feeder puts out in a day.

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                          • #14
                            In New York, it was found in 2005 in some game-farm deer, not far from my area, in fact. It was contained and nothing worse came of it. Currently the official stance is that there is no CWD in New York State.

                            Feeding is illegal and we have the importation restrictions on head, spinal cord, etc. that I assume most states have.




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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
                              I kinda agree on the bait "pile" thing.
                              Yes, I use a feeder. I'd wager it doesn't disperse more than 1.5 to 2 cups per run.
                              I'm not trying to feed/fatten the deer, just offer them a snack.
                              One deer would starve to death on what my feeder puts out in a day.
                              I see. Letting the deer become familiar with eating out of a metal feeder is keeping them more wild than throwing it on the ground. Okay.

                              Comment

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