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ive hunted all my life with my dad ... i just recently got into bowhunting and absolutely fell in love ... but every time that m

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  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Pick out a spot on his/her body where you want the arrow to go and don't take you eye off it!

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  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Pick out a spot on his/her body where you want the arrow to go and don't take you eye off it!

    Leave a comment:


  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Agreed with Jim in Mo answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • hjohn429
    replied
    Pick a spot. You need to have a drill that you use every time you practice. My drill is "S,D,A,P,R." The letters stand for stance, draw, anchor, pin, release. You need to make sure your stance is square. When you draw, keep it slow and steady. Once you have drawn your bow, you need too make sure your arm is not too loose or too tight,and that your full body is in the correct position. You then need to trace your pinto behind the deer's shoulder and pick atuft of hair to aim at. Keep aiming intensely at the one spot. Slowly begin squezeing the trigger like you would on a rifle. After you release, you need to keep your bow in-line with the deer or "follow throgh."

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  • rkimberlin
    replied
    I was a first time archer last season and I missed my very first deer, the second one however...she wasn't so lucky. I found it best to really mentally prepare myself for whatever. I saw the doe out at 100 yrds, i had time to watch her come in and almost anticipate what she was gonna do, what I was gonna do,how and when i was gonna draw, what shot i would take, angle, yardage, etc. I clouded my mind with all that rather than let my nerves take over with excitment. Hope this helps, and good luck next season.

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  • summit229
    replied
    Thanks Sharkfin, and as I expected from the rest of your post that you were willing to take the shots.

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  • Sharkfin
    replied
    Summit229, you are correct. I was willing to shoot every doe I had in my sights but did not intend to shoot. My situation might also be different in that where I hunt I can take a doe anytime with my bow. We have either sex days and antlerless tags when rifle hunting but can shoot a doe with bow and arrow througout the season with a limit of two per day and 10 per season. I do not advocate taking aim on anything one is not willing to kill. I picked up this tactic from several different hunting shows and it has helped me maintain composure when I draw back on an animal that I am both willing and intending to shoot.

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  • summit229
    replied
    Sharkfin, I'm sure your intention is to help the young hunter, and I don't mean to be critical here, but I think you should have mentioned that you should never draw a bow (or aim a rifle) at anything you are not WILLING to kill. The key word here being WILLING, not NOT INTENDING. I have had game animals in my sights before and not taken the shot, but you must always be willing to take the consequences if Murphy decides to make his presence known. A couple questions he may want to ask himself before drawing might be, Do I have a doe permit in my pocket? Am I willing to cut short my hunting trip if I tag out on a doe? Lots of animals AND PEOPLE have been shot by other people who did not INTEND to shoot them. Just make sure you are WILLING before you draw or aim.

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  • Sharkfin
    replied
    All of the above is good advice. One thing that used to get me was trying to see the shot hit the deer. I did the same thing with my rifle and I started doing it after years of hunting and taking many deer. For some reason I started lifting my head to see the deer react and I was missing. When I started bow hunting I was doing the same thing. I had to stop thinking about what happened after the shot and just concentrate on making the shot. I don't know if you start shaking when you are at full draw but something that I've heard helps with that is holding at full draw on an animal with no intention of shooting. When I'm hunting and I see a doe I don't intend to shoot I sometimes draw my bow and hold ready to shoot then just let the deer walk. I've taken two bucks this way. I saw a doe, drew, held on her knowing I was not going to release then a buck walked out right behind her. This helps your head deal with what your body is trying to do. I'd like to know what you recall when you miss. Are you shaking, do you miss high or low or do you shoot in front or behind the deer? One other thing to remember is to keep your bow hand relaxed at the grip. Holding the grip tight puts torqe on the bow and can cause arrows to do funny things.

    Leave a comment:


  • willkillsdeer
    replied
    trace your pin up the backside of the deers front leg pick a spot behind the shoulder and shoot even when target shooting consitaccy=accuurciey DON'T LOOK AT THE HORNS!!!!!!!

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  • bonnier-admin_2
    replied
    It’s like walking a tight rope, tell that little voice in the back of your head to shut up, remember to breath and look away occasionally to get your composure back.

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  • pumakitchen
    replied
    I don't know if you are shooting from a treestand or not. But if you are make sure you practice from a tree stand. I would also try and shoot a doe for you first animal(if its legal where you hunt) it might help you get rid of those first bow kill jitters. One problems I had when I first started was judging distances. Deer look alot bigger and closer when they are alive. Make sure you know your distances.

    Leave a comment:


  • CPT BRAD
    replied
    Find targets that are life size pictures of big bucks. Shoot at those from hunting conditions. Stand, blind, whatever remember Aim small miss small, Aim big miss big! you also need to shoot at angles if you tree stand hunt then shoot from normal height. Also when you are in the stand CLEARLY mark your distances in at least 180 degree circle. Rocks, broke branches, even stick stuck in the ground will be recognizable to you but not the deer. Use your sites, that's what they're for. Remember to make you practice as real as possible by life size targes and tree stands, practice practice practice, and when your in the stand eliminate all the variables.

    Leave a comment:


  • Golfing Sportsman
    replied
    The key isn't to eliminate nerves it's to learn how to control them. Join an archery league or shoot in 3d competitions, the nerves, stress excitement of winning or losing your match will teach you how to deal with those same feelings in the woods. Like walt smith said if you don't get excited you should give it up, you just need to learn how to deal with the excitement.

    Leave a comment:


  • Walt Smith
    replied
    When you stop getting excited thats when you hang up your bow. Oh, don't look at the rack, try to draw when they're not looking, and concentrate on a single spot, not the whole deer. After you hit one and you pay attention to where it ran, sit there for at least 10 minutes because if you were shaking before hand you really can't function afterward.

    Leave a comment:

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