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What are everyones views about fenced hunting and baiting

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  • #16
    cannot stand the idea of fenced hunting. i really wish the outdoor tv shows would use disclaimers when they hunt fenced operation. that said, i won't criticize those who utilize it unless they start claiming to their trophies (pay by the inch) as "booners". B& C is limited to fair chase, free-ranging animals. as for feeders, learn the animals habits, do not create new habits.

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    • #17
      I couldn't agree more with MB915. Fences and feeders are not for me, but I dislike the B-word, ban, even more. There are not enough hunters as a percentage of the total population for us to pick and choose our "pure" allies. The antis don't like any hunting, and they are fanatically committed to stopping all of it. They do not discriminate and we shouldn't either. If we don't hang together, we shall surely all hang separately.

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      • #18
        I am all for feeders and high fences. I have hunted with and without. The vast areas of land under high fence in west and south Texas are not unlike your National Forests. The snobs who turn their noses up at the fence by saying " Its not fair" will be the first to grab a high powered rifle and "sneak" within 300 yards to shoot a buck and say that it was "fair-chase". Those high fences add greatly to the health of a deer heard by stopping EHD and CWD at the gate. They also reduce highway accidents saving untold millions in insurance premiums.
        To the rest of you "purists" who prefer the loin cloth and knife; you have a much better chance of killing a mature buck on a food plot than you ever will under a feeder. The feeder supports the health of young deer and does. Trophy bucks will generally never come anywhere close to the feeder. Food plots and grain fields are way less sporting than a feeder but since we are about fair; we need to outlaw deer drives because you are not outsmarting the deer you are just herding him like a cow. Hunting on private lands where grain is grown should also be outlawed because thats really just a big feeder.

        unbelievable.

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        • #19
          I do not think fenced hunting is fair for animals. That said I do not really care if people do it. If cared about how the animals felt about it I would have taken up golf instead. That said I don't do it and probally never will.

          Baiting is ok, but here in michigan where it is currently banned because of chronic wasting disease. I think it is good that it is regulated.

          For me at the end of the day it is all about putting some meat on the table, how it got there is less important than the fact that it is there. I think alot of people get to caught up in the thrill of the hunt to really appreciate what it is really about.

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          • #20
            Fenced hunting is not fair chase and any true hunter would not consider it fair chase. The sad thing is with property owners taking advantage of leasing their land for hunting to make some extra money; so does the person who chooses to have fenced in areas to hunt. Freedom of choice I guess, we don't have to like it, but we have to live with it.

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            • #21
              There isn't one answer for the whole country. It really depends on the size of the property and the population of deer. There are fenced ranches out west that are larger than the gamelands and state parks we hunt in the Northeast- business owners have every right to protect their heard from traffic or predators.

              Unfortunately, there are also places where you can buy a trophy buck and "hunt" it from a heated blind with a TV. I'd hardly consider that hunting, but if someone is foolish enough to pay 10m for a buck- I guess that's his business. It must be a great story to tell your grandchildren, "Well tommy- I recall is was cold that day as the guide drove me to the blind in a golf cart.. I remember it was half time when he told me a big one was approaching the feeder... I placed my $15,000 custom 30-06 on the bench rest and dropped him from 50 yards.."

              Where I live in SE PA, we are over-populated with doe and I'd support anything that reduces the heard including crossbows, baiting, or higher bag limits. May main concern here is with baiting is disease not ethics.

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              • #22
                I've tried to do corn piles for years. I have not shot a deer over one yet. I have shot 8 deer in the past two years, none of them were within 200 yards of my corn pile, so the statement that baiting is "unfair" is disputable.

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                • #23
                  I have done baiting in the past, but have never shot a large deer over a bait pile. However I have shot several Pope and Young deer, but they have been over large food plots or agricultural fields. I used to treat bait piles as supplemental feeding through the harsh winter months, but I have found good food plots have been much more successful and actually cheaper in the long run. However their are certain places that you would never see a deer if it wasn't for baiting. For example,most of the hunts in northern Canada you wouldn't get a chance at a large whitetail if it wasn't for baiting. Or in Texas, you might never get a deer to step out of a sendaro. For high fences it is cool to see large animals, but it isn't hunting if it has a guarantee.

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                  • #24
                    Teufelhunden posted an outright fallicy in his comment. CWD and EHD are bred and spread mostly by high fence operations. That is why I worked tirelessly on the citizens initiative in MT to ban hunting on game farms. The landowner can still operate them but it thinned their ranks considerbly. All game farms are required to double fence to prevent any ingress/egress however failures do occur and any potential contact by wild animals with game farm pet targets will immediately result in MASSIVE extermination efforts and testing of all wild deer and elk in near proximity. I remember just such a situation with a game farm by Hardin, MT. CWD and EHD symptoms do not show up in game farm animals until they have been bought, transferred and had offspring. Just look at how these diseases are spreading in areas with game farms. All hunters in all states should would on constitutional ammendments to ban hunting on game farms.

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                    • #25
                      I never have and never will take a animal in a fenced trophy for cash, business. To me it's not hunting and for those who spend thousands may do so just don't post and brag about your conquest and tell us a long story to make yourself out to be a stud hunter. It makes the rest of us sick. As far as baiting goes there is really no need for it, although it does help farmers. If a state decides to allow food plots but outlaws dumping of bait, then this is wrong because foodplots and dumped bait both exist for only one reason and that is drawing animals for hunting. I see nothing wrong with recreational feeding as long as it's spread out over a large area and not during hunting seasons.

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                      • #26
                        I did not post an outright fallicy. Fences by their very nature reduce interaction between deer. Without interaction the disease can be stopped and eradicated before they leave the fence. I know of no wildlife manager that would invest hundreds of thousands of dollars in a deer herd and not monitor the health of his herd; that would be lunacy. Constant spray programs can pretty much eliminate the midges that cause EHD.

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                        • #27
                          High fence is not fair. Something wild shouldnt be fenced in. The deer don't belong to the landowner they belong to every tax paying American. And if I'm correct doesn't that mean that in high fence places they are bought and sold like cattle? Then fed and vaccinated like cattle? Doesn't leave much room for sport in my opinion. Maybe I'm wrong on that, but anyway you look at it its not right.

                          To compare an agricultural field to a feeder is just plain ignorant. I've never heard of disease being easily spread from deer eating from the same 100 acre bean field. Can't say the same for feeders. And mature bucks rarely come to feeders? I dont own a feeder and wouldn't know but I have seen countless pics and video of very nice bucks standing around and eating from a feeder.

                          Baiting and feeding in my opinion can be detrimental to herd health. Many diseases are easily spread from deer eating from the same bait pile. Winter feeding I think can be done with the right intentions to help them make it through a rough winter but when they grow dependent on it and it stops, they suffer. I say leave the WILD in WILDLIFE.

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                          • #28
                            Unless someone can give me a really good reason why some people should have thousands of acres of land that is fenced off to non-paying customers while public land is taken and hunters have to pile into what is left of the public land, i see no good reason for fenced off areas.
                            As for baiting, pointless. No hunting involved.

                            Nate

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                            • #29
                              There is no fence in the world that can contain a der or prevent their interaction. CWD has been documented to stay in the soil long after captive pet targets have been removed. Have you noticed that there have been CWD problems in every state that has game farms. Thats why everyhunter reading here needs to actively pursue how they cam ban hunting on game farms in their home state.

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                              • #30
                                I think it all depends on the situation, but it, like other things is right at times, but just as often, if not more often they are not right. Plus it might not be legal. Just things to consider.

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