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Whats the best way to go about asking permission to hunt on private land? Is it best to just walk up and knock on the door or t

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  • Whats the best way to go about asking permission to hunt on private land? Is it best to just walk up and knock on the door or t

    Whats the best way to go about asking permission to hunt on private land? Is it best to just walk up and knock on the door or to try to get a phone number and call ahead before stopping by? Any advice would be appreciated.

  • #2
    Your best bet is going to be an agricultural spread, like a farm or ranch. Farmers and ranchers are entrepreneurial spirits, and close to the land, and you'd be surprised how few of them, especially old timers, actually hunt. Save up a few hundred bucks, and ask first, in person, and then if they act like they can't accommodate you, say you're willing to pay $400 for the season/year. That's my perspective, as a landowner.

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    • #3
      Tex is right. See the farmers or timberland owners in person. Shave, comb your hair, dress nicely and wash the truck before the visit. Don't wear cammo. Be polite and introduce your self. Be plain spoken about what you want. Let them know that you would be willing to provide free labor for the farm or if you have a special skill let them know that. If they say no then offer to lease. If no again, then be polite and say thank you. If you are polite they just may tell you about a neighbor that will let you hunt!

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      • #4
        I think that its always best to ask permission in person. Most people don't like giving permission to a person they can't see. Land owners are more comfortable when they can evaluate you. Honesty is another biggy for landowners, when I ask permission I always let them know the days I will be their, who will be with me, and I usually try and check in before I leave the property. It is best to ask permission far in advance, asking permission the day before season rarely works. Get to know the land owner if possible, most are very friendly and love talking about their land and its animals, I can't count how many animals I have harvested due to a tip form the land owner. Lastly be persistant, don't be afraid to ask, I have probably asked permission on over 100 ranches and I have never been treated poorly. If they don't want you on their property they will tell you, then you move on. Hope this helps.

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        • #5
          Be Polite. Give people a great impression of hunters. Offer to work during the summer or offer some of the venison. Or bowhunt, because more people wont mind bowhunting compared to guns.

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          • #6
            Ask them! People aren't the type to just ppunch you in the face for asking you a question, especially about hunting. If you don't know them, then find out their address and mail them a letter. Typically, that works.

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            • #7
              Try to meet them in late winter or early spring before their work begins. Tell them you don't want anything free and you'd like to help thoughout the summer with whatever needs doing, not just one day here and there. There's never enough hands during the planting/havesting seasons.

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              • #8
                Ask in person. As mentioned in the above answers, sping to early summer is a good idea. Ask if they need any help (cutting wood, posting property). If you're granted permission, a case of beer and/or some venison is always good, and remember treat the property like you would treat your own. Don't litter of leave any mess behind!!

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                • #9
                  start knocking down doors and ask. they are not going to shoot you for asking. the worst they can do is say no.

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                  • #10
                    Nothing good happens if you never ask. Be polite, respectful, use your sirs and maams, and never go out without permission. The number one reason i get when turned down is that they caught someone on their land without permission and now they don't let anyone on. One bad egg will ruin it for everyone, DON'T BE THAT GUY!

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                    • #11
                      you've got to go ask in person. in the winter after the season closes will work best. offer some sort of compensation, either work, money or meat. you should be able to hunt unless the farmer actually hunts it himself. the least intrusive would be off season hunting like bow or muzzle loaders, because if the guy is going to hunt it will be with rifle. NEVER EVER DRIVE IN A WET FIELD, GET STUCK, OR LEAVE THE GATES OPEN! you will ruin it for yourself and everyone else.

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                      • #12
                        knock on the door and ask in person.

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                        • #13
                          Go and ask. I try to ask people that don't hunt on their own property themselves. Get to be friends with them and don't make it a business transaction.

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                          • #14
                            Face to face. It's always harder for people to say no that way. Be sincere and polite, it will take you a long way.

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                            • #15
                              In person is the best.

                              Nate

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