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Whats the best way to get private property to bowhunt on?

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  • Whats the best way to get private property to bowhunt on?

    Whats the best way to get private property to bowhunt on?

  • #2
    I think I answered this on somebody else's post too. Find local farmers and ask permission. Offer to work for the privilege of hunting. Be polite, always!! If he says no, offer to work for the summer anyway, let him know how serious you are. Eventually he will see how serious you are.

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    • #3
      Well there is no point of asking to hunt on somones land if there is no deer there. I recomend shining or asking him to take you around first. Then ask for permission to hunt but like the other guy said be very polite.

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      • #4
        Just do what kiflorian said and more often than not you can find land that way. I have two farms that I hunt on because I work for the guy haying.

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        • #5
          Also have to agree with the last three, have to ask and be very polite. Treat the land better than you would treat your own. Also give a hand to the land owner. Clear everything you do prior do doing it...hanging stands, trimming trees, feeding animals, driving on the land, bringing others with you..etc

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          • #6
            Look sharp not like a bum, carefully and respectfully approach the inhabitants putting on your best Jim Carrey smile and ask as if your asking their Daughter out for a date. You must remember, permission is for you and you only. The number one reason to sour a land owner is the friend you brought will later bring his friends and their friends will bring their friends. Respect the land you hunt on going out of your way picking up trash, helping to maintain and ask the land owner if you can help to do something like stringing and repairing fences and turning wrenches etc. Turning a hunting day into a working day with the land owner will open up other areas to hunt.

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            • #7
              Like everyone else said ask and offer to help with anything. I don't think I would do any spotlighting like LJ said that might get you in more trouble than anything. Even if you can't work all summer offer to help on the weekends and be polite. You might also start out hunting small game and work up to deer once you've proven to the guy that you respect his ground.

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              • #8
                All of the above is good but I usually bring something like a Butterball Turkey, Smoked ham or a package of my specially smoke bacon like none you get in the store. They always say that is the best bacon they ever had.
                Find a minister that likes to hunt and become his best friend. That happened to me one day and literally got me thousands of acres of Kansas farmland to hunt on.

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                • #9
                  I don't think I would recommend LJ's approach. Spotlighting or asking for a tour will not get you very far in a positive direction. As the other folks have said. Dress neatly and leave the camo at home. Be polite. Offer assistance, if you have a special talent make that known and offer your services. Wash your vehicle. Don't chew tobacco and spit on his lawn. Leave your buddies at home. Always thank them even if you get a no. Be respectful. Yes sir and yes Mam doesn't just work in the south!

                  If you are successful follow any and all directions to the letter. Don't mar or injure trees with stands, don't destroy crops or other property, don't disturb livestock. As Del said, bring them special treats they can't find just anywhere. Offer them part of your game, processed and packaged of course.

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                  • #10
                    ask the person that owns the property in advance to hunt.

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                    • #11
                      Save up and offer a little money. I say this from the landowner's point of view. An old acquaintance, a friendly enough guy, wanted to bowhunt this past season. He approached it right: he said he would be willing to pay. I said, sure, you can hunt all you want for a calendar year for whatever is legal for 600 bucks. He thought that sounded dandy. Having bowhunters leasing the back 80 acres instead of rifle hunters is far preferable because my house is on that property.

                      That's not to say that you shouldn't approach the helpful & free angle first. Just say, howdy, I was wondering if I could poke around these here words on your property with my bow, and see if I could get a deer. Don't offer to pay until the property owner gets that glazed or sympathetic look in his/her eye, and be persistent without badgering. But a few hundred bucks can get you a long way with we farmer-rancher types.

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                      • #12
                        ask the person also do something for him take him to dinner work on his land do something for him earn the privilege

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                        • #13
                          buy it

                          Nate

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                          • #14
                            If you have the means to afford it, then buy some of your own property to do what you want with. Second option is to ask local farmers if you could help them take some of the nuisance deer off their land that destroys their property. Farmers hate hogs in Florida, they will actually pay for people to hunt them.

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                            • #15
                              Find local farmers and ask permission!

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