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Has anyone ever harvested a 3 legged Deer? I saw one a hunter got this weekend the wound was completely healed and at least a ye

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  • Has anyone ever harvested a 3 legged Deer? I saw one a hunter got this weekend the wound was completely healed and at least a ye

    Has anyone ever harvested a 3 legged Deer? I saw one a hunter got this weekend the wound was completely healed and at least a year old. The doe was healthy and showed no ill effects.

  • #2
    Last year I took a doe that had a limp leg. She was healthy and big. But she was getting old. When I took her I looked closely at her leg. I found no bullet wounds or arrow wounds. What I did find was mist oh her bones were solidified. Almost as I'd she never had any cartilage or tendons in that front leg.

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    • #3
      I saw a big 4 point buck years ago during archery season with three legs.
      I was shooting my bow instinctively and shot over his back.
      He ran away just as fast as any other deer.

      I shot a 250 pound New Jersey black bear back in 2011. He was holding his front leg up as he walked. He would not put any of his weight on his injured leg. I shot him as a mercy killing because I thought he was hit by an automobile. I did not know what internal damage was done to the bear.

      At the NJ bear check in station they told me my bear was caught in one of their snares two months earlier. So the state Fish and Wildlife crippled my bear.
      I wonder how many other bears the state crippled by using snares then releasing the bear?

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      • #4
        I never shot one but I saw one several years ago. When she was in a field feeding you could see her hop while feeding( it was her front leg), but when she took off running you couldn't tell her from the other deer.

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        • #5
          I shot a nine point several years ago. He was missing his right front leg from the "elbow" down. The wound was heeled and he was traveling with a slight limp. The deer was healthy and in good shape.

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          • #6
            Last years doe I shot had a crippled hoof and limp. A doe I shot this year also had a broken front left leg at sometime. I have seen many crippled deer some tripods as I like to call them. Most can be attributed to sloppy hunting both the ones I took seemed more natural.

            5 years ago I took a narley old buck (I should say hideous) on the last day of gun season just to finish my season. When I went to butcher him I found a fully expanded HP copper slug in his front leg midway between his elbow and shoulder. He had been shot before (Clearly) what appeared to be through his vitals but totally missed and the bullet stuck in his leg. When I cut into his leg I almost lost my lunch, a puss sack formed around it. He also had some narley wounds throughout his body along with some other things that almost made me lose my lunch. Needless to say I gave most the meat away on him! My brother made fun of me calling it the Make-A-Wish deer!

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            • #7
              I once shot a young whitetail buck that was limping along, dragging one of his front hoofs in the dry leaves. I could hear him coming before I saw him.
              When I examined the carcass, I saw that the front leg bone had been shattered, probably by a misplaced bullet. The lower leg was attached and hanging on just by the hide.
              The wound had healed and there was no bleeding.
              It's a wonder he didn't bleed to death with a wound like that.

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              • #8
                Back in the 80s I shot a raghorn bull elk that had one side of a front hoof worn down. After skinning him I discovered that his upper leg above the elbow had been shattered the previous year. Looked like it was caused by collision with a vehicle. No scar. Not a mark. But the jagged edges of the poorly healed fracture must have been a source of constant pain. He was very fat and in fine condition. You can see a photo of the bull in my profile album.

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