Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I am still in Montana hunting pheasants. This year I have been shooting very well. Much better than usual. Many days I am bat

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Not complaining. Not at all. The longer I'm in the field, the happier I am.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carl Huber
    replied
    OH quit complaining I would give anything to hunt Montana with a good dog. Some times it's the journey not the destination.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Earlier in the season my Britt did make a difference. She is maturing into an excellent pointing dog. However, the birds are getting spooky and cattle have been moved onto winter grounds eliminating much cover. Consequently pheasants are now mostly in the thick stuff and not holding well. So it's work for the flushing labs which means surprise shots at greater distances ("greater" meaning further than the point blank shooting over the pointer). Again, my shooting should be suffering under these conditions. It's not.

    Leave a comment:


  • I am still in Montana hunting pheasants. This year I have been shooting very well. Much better than usual. Many days I am bat

    I am still in Montana hunting pheasants. This year I have been shooting very well. Much better than usual. Many days I am batting a thousand and never worse than .500. My glasses were changed slightly in February but any advantage that might have provided has been nullified by the rapid progress of cataract in my good right eye. Haven't changed my gun or loads. Hunting conditions have, however, changed significantly. It's not been a good year here for pheasants. I can find birds but it takes a LOT of work. Yesterday I bagged a rare limit of roosters but had to walk at least twelve miles. A very long day without water or grub ... or rest. By the time we finally did get into some birds I was pretty much in the bag. But only fired five shots for three birds. And one round connected hard on a rooster that didn't come down. So, my question is this: if it takes so much effort to find the birds, shouldn't my birds per shot ratio be lower? Is there something in my subconscious working to improve my aim in situations where shots are few? Have any of you encountered this phenomenon?

Welcome!

Collapse

Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

Right Rail 1

Collapse

Top Active Users

Collapse

There are no top active users.

Right Rail 2

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Right Rail 3

Collapse

Footer Ad

Collapse
Working...
X