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New shooting enthusiast here at age 53. Will be hunting soon. Question: when on a multi-day hunt, what is done with the carcass

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  • New shooting enthusiast here at age 53. Will be hunting soon. Question: when on a multi-day hunt, what is done with the carcass

    New shooting enthusiast here at age 53. Will be hunting soon. Question: when on a multi-day hunt, what is done with the carcass and leftover meat of a harvested buck taken on day one? I other words, do you eat as much as you can and bury the rest, since you can't freeze it when out in the field? Many thanks.

  • #2
    Lord, no. You should prop the body cavity open to keep it as cool as possible until you can get it to a butcher, preferably the same day. The nearest local town should have a deer processing facility or butcher who will cut, wrap and freeze the packaged venison for you.
    There are also freeze lockers in many small towns that can be rented by hunters until they are ready to return home.

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    • #3
      P.S. Check the local newspaper in the area you plan to hunt and look for ads. The freeze lockers are large enough to store the whole deer carcass intact to prevent spoilage in warm weather. Good luck!

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      • #4
        Rivegauche610- that would certainly depend in the climate you're hunting, northern US in november, where the day time high is in the 40's, the meat won't spoil over night, and might keep well for 4-5 days without an issue. As 99 E said, ALWAYS split the chest cavity when gutting it and then find a stick long enough to hold the two split sides apart. Keep it in the shade and hang it in a tree high 6-10 ft off the ground. I hang them from the hind legs and when i do, I put another stick between it's back legs to keep it's groin open. I also remove the inner loins so that they will not dry out. (and so I can celebrate success with the best cut of meat going). Best of luck, and congrats on your new hobby, I bet it'll be a passion before long!!

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        • #5
          Rivegauche610- that would certainly depend in the climate you're hunting, northern US in november, where the day time high is in the 40's, the meat won't spoil over night, and might keep well for 4-5 days without an issue. As 99 E said, ALWAYS split the chest cavity when gutting it and then find a stick long enough to hold the two split sides apart. Keep it in the shade and hang it in a tree high 6-10 ft off the ground. I hang them from the hind legs and when i do, I put another stick between it's back legs to keep it's groin open. I also remove the inner loins so that they will not dry out. (and so I can celebrate success with the best cut of meat going). Best of luck, and congrats on your new hobby, I bet it'll be a passion before long!!

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          • #6
            If you haven't passed a hunters training course (and it certainly sounds like you must not have), then you should undertake that before you even pick up a gun. You are asking a very fundamental question that really anyone who is ready to go in the field should already know even if they haven't been hunting before.

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            • #7
              Ditto OntarioHonker,

              Also, you should look around for an experienced
              mentor that can give you some tips.

              Good luck, hope enjoy hunting and the many rewards.

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              • #8
                OntarioHonker, I agree that he should take one before he starts, but it probably is not required in his state. I believe that if you were born any time before 1973 or so, a hunting education course is not required in most states. However, if you are not wanting to take such a course or don't have time before deer season, Rivergauche, at least look up some hunting for beginners videos, or articles, so that you are prepared for anything that will, or may happen in the field. Back to the question, though, it completely depends on the climate. Anywhere the temperature is constantly under 40 degrees, you can hang a deer in a shaded area for about 4 days safely. This will also make your venison taste much better as it is aging the meat. Make sure you hang it out of reach of bears, coyotes, and other predators. Also, try to keep as much of the skin on the deer as possible when hanging it to keep flies and such off the meat.

                If you are in temperatures below freezing for an extended period of time, the deer will freeze solid, and make the skinning process very difficult. Believe me, I've had it happen a few times. If it is much over 40 degrees, bring a few bags of ice and a cooler. fit as much as you can in the cooler, and eat the rest. If you can't do that, and temps are too high, small game hunt the first few days, eat what you kill that day, and wait until the last day to harvest a deer, or don't go at all. Good luck this season.

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                • #9
                  Get two big ice chests. Fill one with ice, (crushed or cubed). Fish/shrimp dealers often sell bulk ice cheaper than buying bags. Gut the deer as soon as possible after killing it, then take it to camp and strip off the hide. Make sure, when gutting, to open up the pelvic area, rib cage, and get the wind pipe out.
                  Hang the deer head down, and strip off the skin from the hind hocks down.
                  Cut off the neck, shoulders, and bone out the rib cage, putting the quarters over a two or three inch layer of ice in your empty ice chest.
                  Cut out the tenderloins and backstrap, then sever the boned out carcass right below the hams. Split the hind legs through the pelvic bone, and put the rest of your deer in the chest, and cover with ice.
                  This method will keep a deer for several days, and as you drain the bloody water and add fresh ice, you improve the quality of your meat.
                  Good luck,
                  crm

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                  • #10
                    Down here, we skin and quarter. The meat is then placed in a cooler with alternating bags of ice. Prop the cooler up so that water will run out the drain. Add ice as needed. Should keep 3 or 4 days easily!

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                    • #11
                      Ditto~Honker Whats with the -4 ????
                      He specks the Truth and Ditto~~99E +1 all good advice, That's what F&S is all about!!

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                      • #12
                        [Blank]

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                        • #13
                          1) Chances are you won't kill anything on day one or any day for that matter, so you better pack enough food to last the entire trip.

                          2) Do not engage in any endeavor that you are not prepared for (i.e. if you're just starting hunting, start small and work you way up...a multi-day hunt is a rather advanced hunting endeavor.)

                          3) NEVER waste meat! Be prepared to pack meat out and get it on ice if the weather is warm. It is generally acceptable to leave the hide, guts, and boned out skeleton behind, but NEVER leave the meat behind.

                          4) If you're a first-time hunter...go with someone who can show you the ropes. It's not hard to find someone in the hunting community willing to show a new hunter how to hunt.

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                          • #14
                            If you were born before 1969 you are not required to go through hunters education. Whether the question was fundamental or not I'm sure he didn't ask for your opinion @Ohonker on whether it warranted an answer.

                            Depends on the time of the year. If you can: we usually fill the inside of the carcass with bags of ice.

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                            • #15
                              If you were born before 1969 you are not required to go through hunters education. Whether the question was fundamental or not I'm sure he didn't ask for your opinion @Ohonker on whether it warranted an answer.

                              Depends on the time of the year. If you can: we usually fill the inside of the carcass with bags of ice.

                              Comment

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