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i dont have the money for a range finder how hard is it to take a guess at which pin i should use or is there any other tips ive

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  • i dont have the money for a range finder how hard is it to take a guess at which pin i should use or is there any other tips ive

    i dont have the money for a range finder how hard is it to take a guess at which pin i should use or is there any other tips ive never bow hunted this will be my first year

  • #2
    It is very difficult to accurately guess distances when archery hunting. Especially when you consider the fact that you son't be practicing with a rangefinder to know what distances you are practicing at. The best advice I could give you is to come up with the money for a cheap range finder. If that truly just isn't an option. I would encourage you to have the patience and discipline to take only the "gimme" up close in your lap shots until the point comes where you can afford a range finder.

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    • #3
      Or, you could measure a few points from your treestands or wherever you hide and know fairly precisely what the range is. For instance, that bush is 34 yds, that cedar is 23 yds, etc.

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      • #4
        Marking off in the preseason is great advice. Another option would be to use a pendelum bow site if you are hunting from a deer stand. I used a Keller pendulum for years with great success. I ended up switching to a standard fixed pin sight a few years ago when I started hunting more off the ground.

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        • #5
          Knowing the distance is essential. Try to either pre-measure distances or save up the money. The range finder is the first item I would buy when you can. People will probably say you should learn to judge distance instead but they are wrong.

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          • #6
            I have an expensive range finder but would never use it for archery hunting. It creates too much motion and takes too much time. I have enough trouble just drawing the arrow and aiming my shot without spooking deer. Besides, I've tried ranging deer and by the time I drop the range finder and draw the bow, they have moved out of range. You can just about spit on deer from your bow stand and with a little practice and a few tricks you will be able to estimate easily.

            I'm not a fan of archery shots over 30 yards either because I've seen way too many deer crippled that move before the arrow gets there. It's not a matter of arrow drop. It is that they may hear the bow string or see you or the arrow and jump resulting in gut shots, rump shots, face shots, etc. I really dislike those shots and will let them walk rather than subjecting them to the risk of torture caused by yours truly.

            When you practice, I suggest using deer sized targets (I use a burlap bag type target that is deer sized). When you practice, mark off 10, 20, 30 yards etc. and get your pins adjusted to those distances. As you practice, you will quickly learn how to judge distance out to 30 yards. The most important thing is to learn how your arrow drops at those distances from a height equivalent to your stand height. I always practice from stand height by standing on a deck, roof or even from a ladder stand so I am well accustomed to the drop. Once you become confident in judging distance, move the target around at random distances and force yourself to judge distance and shoot for that until you are confident.

            Next you need to step off distance to landmarks around your stand as Amflyer advised. Find a 10 yard, 20 yard, etc. from each direction you intend to shoot. If you can't remember, nail a big "30" sign to the 30 yard landmark, etc. Deer can't read so it doesn't bother them. Deer are completely color blind so if you want, you could probably spray paint ranges on the ground around you if necessary (although I've never had to do that). I'm sure with the right amount of practice, you will be very confident and even more successful.

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            • #7
              Despite what the naysayers say, it's not that hard to get by without a rangefinder - I've never hunted with one. Also, I only use a single, fixed pin. My single pin will easily keep the arrow within an 8" diameter circle from point blank to 20 yards - which is about as far as I can get a confident shot off in the woods I hunt anyway. It's also much easier to judge distances accurately between 0-25 yards than it is to judge from 25-50 yards. With practice, you'll find that it's quite easy to judge shorter distances.

              If you want pin-point accuracy, you need to know the precise range. But if you only care about "pie plate" accuracy, precise distances aren't important as long as you keep the shots close.

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              • #8
                Keep in mind that generations of bow hunters tagged deer without the use of range finders or bow sights. They shot instinctively, mentally calculating range and arrow drop. I’m not knocking sights or range finders, just saying it’s possible to shoot without either. Otherwise, Dakota has good advice – practice at variable, known ranges, practice from different heights and positions, measure and memorize the distance from your stand to some trees or other objects in your likely field of fire.

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                • #9
                  Before the range finders came out I had a hundred foot tape measurer on a roll with a handle.

                  I would measure a distance out from my tree stands and mark certain points in the forest.
                  I always did this during January to March when there was little brush or thick foliage to tangle up my measuring tape.

                  Never shoot at any wildlife if you’re not sure of the distance or the shot.
                  Good Luck!

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                  • #10
                    Mark two or three range points around your stand with trail ribbon. 15, 20, 25 yd should do it. Practice from the same height as your tree stand and soon you will be able to judge the distance close enough. I use 2 pins, a 10 and 20 and that works for me.

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                    • #11
                      thanks guys that helps a lot im pretty much bullseye twenty five yards and in but thats on a target on the ground and im not staring at an eight point buck ha ill definatly start more practicing with elevation. Also is seventy lbs good to start shooting at its gotten pretty easy for me but alot of my friends are all set at 60 lbs and they have been bow hunting a while jw

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                      • #12
                        Focus on technique, do not worry about weights. If you can shoot accurately every time, then you shouldn't have a problem. And the issue involving distance... Take a tape measure and range it that way if you can't afford a range finder right now, but I would suggest buying if you are serious about bow hunting. Shoot straight.

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                        • #13
                          Kaden, if you are shooting bullseyes at 25 yards, you are on the right track. The draw weight is up to you. The higher you go, the faster the arrow will travel, reducing the impact of a jumping deer. However, it may also reduce your ability to hold your bow at full draw for long enough to get a clear shot. I personally feel that if you take only good shots, a 45 pound bow will kill deer just as dead as a 70 pound bow. I've also seen several people miss shots because the draw weight was too high for them. My favorite draw weight is 60 pounds and that has served me well but I have also taken deer just as well with 45 pound draw... you just have to be patient and don't ever shoot at a deer that is looking at you. You are quite right too that handling the adrenaline rush from seeing a big buck a few yards away trumps any technology and even years of practice. It takes experience in the field to get better with that but that is the excitement of archery hunting! Best of luck to you. Take only good shots and you will be fine with whatever you choose.

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                          • #14
                            If it was me I would see if I had a friend that had one that I could barrow and go out to the stand that you are sitting in. Find some land marks around you so when a deer comes in you will have a good guess at the distance

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                            • #15
                              Thanks guys i appreciate it i actually just realized that i mow for a guy who works for bass pro and he tests there gear and they send him on all types of hunts all over the world (dream job) but hes guna show me a bunch a tips pretty much everything everyone on here has said but anyways thanks guys

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