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Sorry guys......but i must vent about my latest hunting debacle. I recently got permission to hunt about 350 acres in Frederick

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  • Mdhunter1
    replied
    Thanks all....i feel really stupid because i actually have a lock box for the camera....i just decided not to use it. Buckhunter, I am hunting right off the Monacacy river near Dickerson.

    Leave a comment:


  • DesertWalker
    replied
    Jack
    I truely feel your pain. A couple years ago I lost a camera to a theif also. As Gary has said in some good advice, always lock up your camera. on that note however, I had a python cable on my camera in a cage, hiden and locked. When I came back two weeks later the camera was gone, off the tree that I had left it on. It was extremly frustraiting, and made me angry. I was on public land and in the end, who knows when or who took it. it has made me decide that I would walk farther and work harder to place my cameras so that way it no longer would happen. I agree with you, I am not sure what kind of person would come and take property that is not theirs. I feel bad if I stumle onto someones camera and set it off. I was raised to respect property that was not mine, and all I can hope is that Karma pays them a visit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward J. Palumbo
    replied
    I share your naivete. I would expect folks would bypass it, simply because it wasn't theirs, but perhaps that's too much to expect now. I'm getting feedback about campsite thievery and vandalism from people in areas I'd enjoyed in the past, and I don't know what to make of it. Maybe the concept of the "moral outdoorsman" is outdated and we can't expect that kind of decency any longer. Sorry to learn of it, and I hope you never encounter that again.

    Leave a comment:


  • MR AWESOME
    replied
    I had mine shot up by ediot teenagers with paintball guns. They all had masks so couldnt tell who they were. Made me real mad thats for sure.

    Leave a comment:


  • steve182
    replied
    I have had several stands and cameras stolen. Often both at once. Scumbags are everywhere I see.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    I also agree that "scouting" is as often as not unproductive because it just boots the game out of the area. So I have ALWAYS waited until after the season opens before hunting my areas. Nothing like showing up there and finding some morons have been camped for a week running all over the place with ATVs and partying at night to "scout out" the area before season opens. So I stopped hunting the first two to three weeks of big game season. Not necessarily to increase my productivity but more to help keep my blood pressure down. Anyway, I think all this emphasis on scouting things with trailcams is something the manufacturers of that stuff have shoved down our throats. I can't imagine leaving some expensive thing like that out in the woods and worrying about it all week at work and home. Doesn't sound like fun to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    No one steals my trailcam or treestand because I don't leave anything in the woods. I have always had thousands of square miles of public land to hunt so I roam and track. Never been compelled to still hunt. Still, had my truck broken into once and everything stolen including my dad's wonderful old Ka-Bar knife given to him by his brother on that day (his birthday) thirty years earlier. Not only that the arsehole pulled the light switch and ran the batter down. I had to walk about ten miles to the highway after a day of hiking in knee deep snow. It just about did me in! Luckily the temps didn't drop too badly that night.

    I think you can get by without a trailcam. It's not the end of your hunting. A nice thing to play with but as far as I can see it's not essential even for the kind of hunting you do. If you buy another one I'm sure it will disappear too. Save your money for gas. More trips out there will mean more chances to shoot something. The cost of the trailcam might rob you of that opportunity. My thoughts anyway. Hang in there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Good idea Carl.

    The thief may not steal the trail cam because they need the code so the camera is useless to them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carl Huber
    replied
    I could never understand why the people that make trail cameras don't use the same technology that is used on car radios. Put a mounting plate on a tree. Plug the camera on the plate completing a circuit. Punch in a code. If the circuit is broken the camera is useless without the code. A low cost deterrent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Jack, always use a python cable lock. Never trust public land, private land or your own property. The cost for a python is around $59 each but they are well worth it. I own four python locks and never had a trail cam stolen by a low-life person. I also own four tiny Stanley locks so a scum bag doesn’t open the camera door to steal my memory card with the photos on it.

    Think about it, how many people are out in the woods walking around with bolt cutters or a hack saw?

    Trail cams work during the 90 degree heat, thunder storms, snow blizzards or when the bugs are out sucking on your blood. I like the part when I am working, sleeping or at church my trail cams are taking photos of bears and bucks.

    Plus setting up a trail cam and coming back in a week to switch out your memory card keeps human scent down to a bare minimum.

    I know some guys don't agree with me but checking your trail cams at night with a green or red flashlight lens doesn't scare the wildlife as bad as seeing a person during the daylight hours stumping through the forest.

    Leave a comment:


  • buckhunter
    replied
    Don't let it ruin your season. Have never thought much of trail cameras myself. I see a lot more deer with binos and spotting scope. Play the wind, don't let them smell your trail and shoot straight.

    I fish the Savage several times a year and see plenty of deer. Are you hunting that area?

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    You might mention it to the landowner - if he gave permission to others he would know who was on the land.
    Sorry you lost the camera. I always lock mine, even on my own property. Also, some older ones are plain green and I have covered them in camo tape. Painted the lock and cable also.
    Better luck hunting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mdhunter1
    replied
    I did not lock it...being on private property I got carried away...i guess i'm just a little to naive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Jack, did you have a python cable lock on your trail cam?
    Did you hide your trail cam with pine branches and broken branches with leaves? All you need is the lens cover of the camera clear in the front.

    I wish a trail camera company would make a hidden beckon that the manufacturer could trace right to the scum bag thief's house.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sorry guys......but i must vent about my latest hunting debacle. I recently got permission to hunt about 350 acres in Frederick

    Sorry guys......but i must vent about my latest hunting debacle. I recently got permission to hunt about 350 acres in Frederick County, MD. Probably about 10 other guys hunt it...but only in shotgun season. I recently found what i believe to be the honey hole of the property...a small patch of woods off a soybean field. Anyways, i put up my treestand (locked it of course) and set a trail cam overlooking the old creek bed it looks over. I came back today, one week since i put the cam and stand up. To find the stand untouched, and my game cam along with brand new sd card gone....no where around. this is the second time i have had a camera stolen for me.....and i have reached my breaking point. I cannot think of how low someone must be to do something like that, considering it is most likely another hunter. I'm a 14 year old kid, just trying to experience bow-hunting for the first time, and the sorry bastard had to ruin it. I feel violated. that was my property, and i he took it. I feel like i will come back in another week and my steps will be gone. How low is that? Anybody ever had anything like this happen to them? Thanks. -Jack

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