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Any suggestions for getting fur/hair off of game meat?

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  • Any suggestions for getting fur/hair off of game meat?

    Any suggestions for getting fur/hair off of game meat?

  • #2
    We always use a damp hand towel to wipe down the meat before we cut it, but cheese cloth works well so I have been told, and I think I watched it used once but I wouldn't swear to it. Thanks for jogging my memory though!

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    • #3
      cold running water. I always rinse off my deer once I have them hanging and skinned with the garden hose and a wash cloth. This will also help to cool the meat during the early season.

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      • #4
        If you aren't aging it, the garden hose and a clean washcloth works as well as anything I have seen. I tend to bone it out and then clean each cut in the sink under running water.

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        • #5
          Just run a propane torch over the hair and it turns to dust. Seriously, it works.

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          • #6
            Yes, propane torch works well. Then rub with a damp rag and then hit it with a torch again. But run over it real quick with torch. You'll see the hollow hair popping off. I have always been told not to run water over the meat. Butcher who processed my first elk said that is a definite no-no. Promotes spoilage.

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            • #7
              I take my deer straight to my Meat Processor,They first Hang it,Gut it, Skin it,then it moves to a Down Would Wind Tunnel to blow all the Hair off, then off to a cooler for 4/6Hr, then under the Knife YumYumm.
              I guess a leaf Blower would work??

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              • #8
                I also use a propane torch.

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                • #9
                  I use same exact technique as OH, and in my worthless opinion it is by far the best technique. I guess you could always give you game a hair cut prior to skinning!

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                  • #10
                    My Father and Grandfather wet a piece of cheese cloth with a dilution of vinegar and water, then wiped the meat off , seemed to work fine

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                    • #11
                      The propane torch is an intriguing idea, course we did not have one in the old days. I am so mechanically inept the meat would be medium rare before I finished. Kindest Regards

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                      • #12
                        I process my own.
                        I try to keep hair to a minimum when skinning. You can't keep it all off!
                        When it gets to the cutting board, I basically skun it again.
                        this keeps the majority of hair off.
                        Even USDA allows "some" hair! (ppm) They even allow bug parts and rodent droppings! Again, in ppm! (parts per million)
                        The ONLY thing that doesn't get skinned is the cubed grinding meat.
                        I don't believe that I keep ALL hair out, but I think I do a pretty good job! I'll put mine up against any meat market/grocery store for cleanliness!

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                        • #13
                          Thanks guys! Even though I try to keep the hair/fur off while I am skinning squirrels a little gets through. I have been using a nail brush and cold running water to get the majority off but I have a grandson that if he sees just one hair he refuses to eat any of the meat. May try some of these techniques.

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                          • #14
                            Best thing I have found is to use skinning techniques that require minimal cutting.

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                            • #15
                              In the absence of a blow torch, I use a chamois (shammy) cloth. Get it wet like you would for drying your car, wring it out real good and then run it over the meat. It works better if the deer or whatever is still hanging and not already cut up.

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