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I never had a pair of boots or shoes that were made with Goretex that have kept my feet dry while wearing them for several hours

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  • I never had a pair of boots or shoes that were made with Goretex that have kept my feet dry while wearing them for several hours

    I never had a pair of boots or shoes that were made with Goretex that have kept my feet dry while wearing them for several hours in wet grass. I have had about 10 pairs over the years all with poor results. Anybody have better results? Rubber boots have been my stand-by but they can be uncomfortable after a while.

  • #2
    Ah must admit that Ah have nevva solved the boot problem.

    Rubber boots are best, butt nevva let water git in them!

    It will take the skin right offa yore toes.

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    • #3
      Goretex boots are a myth in my experience. Work somewhat until they are broken in. Then they are broke. I also hate rubber boots. I have problems with them chafing my calves. If you solve this problem, let me know.

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      • #4
        The boots in question are water resistant. There are several spray on water proofing products on the market. Spray before you go into the field. Dunham, Nikwax are a few and help some what. Key word being some what.

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        • #5
          Hi...


          I think Carl may have a solution. I've used spray-on products on many items. Frequently use Camp Guard. Just DON'T spray it indoors...!! If you do, you'll immediately know why not...!!

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          • #6
            Many boots leak in the seams. Buy a good boot like lowa or crispi and they will remain dry.

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            • #7
              I have noticed that the wet grass thing starts to with my legs getting wet then running into my boots. I just where wool socks almost everywhere when hunting wet and cold areas because even wet wool is still somewhat warm. rubber has the same issue for me but rubber is about a thousand time more uncomfortable to me. Sprays work just make sure it does not smell too much if they are you hunting boots I used some stuff once and it made my boots smell like the dog took a leak on them. for weeks i couldn't get the smell out.

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              • #8
                Wet grass does not affect my Irish Setters. Every year they get the saddle soap treatment, and a fresh coat of Sno-Seal, put on warm and blown into all seams with a hair dryer. They stand up to working for hours on the skinning rack, with water going everywhere.
                For snow, and really cold conditions, I have a pair of rubber insulated boots, made in Canada, that are supposedly good to way below zero. The have an adjustable lace on the foot, layers of insulation, and are not heavy, due to a nylon top, but they keep my feet and lower legs dry, even in snow drifts. Can't think of the name of the bootmaker right now, but they are NOT for wear unless the weather is very cold.

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                • #9
                  crm, you are probably thinking of either Sorel or Baffin, neither of which make their boots in Canada anymore. Yep, you guessed it ... CHINA! (Some Baffin boots made in Vietnam). Sorel is a place in Quebec and the boots were originally made there and very good quality. They are crap these days. I couldn't get a pair of their Caribou models to last two seasons. The soles are no longer Vibram but some on-site cheap crap with poor traction to start with and wear out faster than toilet paper in a downpour. Worst part is their leather uppers. The tongue leather is just cheap thin garbage and cracks up in short order.

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                  • #10
                    Thats sad to hear about Sorel's. I bought a pair back in the late eighties I still wear today when the weather turns really cold. They were suppose to be good down to something like negative 50F and that might be true if you stayed active; I wear them mostly sitting on stand. I know these have the vibram sole, pretty sure they were made in canada at that time.

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                    • #11
                      Start with a good quality boot and waterproof the exterior as mentioned above.

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                      • #12
                        I used to buy Danner boots until they started making them in China. I have a pair of Irish Setter Gunflint boots that stand up to snow and rain all day. I have a 15 year old pair of Danner's that do fine when it is damp, but they leak in the seams. I have an older pair of Sorel's that don't leak and have been worn on and off for 20 years and still work fine. Buy a pair of good boots from Cabela's that are guaranteed waterproof and keep your receipt and return if they leak. Pony up for some Kennetrek boots and problem solved.

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                        • #13
                          I wear muck boots, only problem is your feet sweat bad if it is hot out, but for cold weather applications they work. My dad loves his Bean boots, by L.L. Bean. In ten years his feet have never been wet, and he attributes it to the same treatments that crm does.

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                          • #14
                            I believe you get what you pay for with boots. My gore tex boots do not leak as long as I take proper care of them and replace them when it is time. If the leather on your boots is getting saturated with water(turns dark in stead of beads up) it is time to condition again. My feet get soaking wet in rubber boots due to sweat. I need a breathable boot like gore tex.

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                            • #15
                              I have had good luck with gore-tex boots using sno-seal and a hair dryer. I can't remember my feet ever being wet since I started this treatment.

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