Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Another BS advertisement. Too bad these outfits can't get someone who has a clue to do their photography. See the first post.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pray- hunt-work
    replied
    O.H. - Happy and Bubba - thank you all for allowing me to share what little I know in the presence of such knowledgable men. Any one of you are more than welcome to come out and share the trail with me in WY. We'll be running about 250 head of quarter horses and my wife and myself have 20 horses between us in our two yearly allotted strings of trainees. Room and bored is covered due to the generosity of the ranch owner allowing us to live in a rather, too large, house. With 40,000 acres we can't get too lost, but should be able to find an adventure if we look for it. OH - the trail doesn't have to end just yet, the offer always stands.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Lets try corral, not correl

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Hang in there Ontario, you have a new little buckaroo to train. Where I grew up, hard on the Nevada, California border everyone pretty much ran cattle and ranged horses on public land together so ear marks were used. All you had to do was whistle or shout from a distance and when the critters raised their heads you could tell if they were yours, saved covering a lot of ground and eased separating them in the Fall. Our ear marks were a swallow fork in both ears and an under bit in the left. We did not ear mark horses, feeling it made them head shy to bridle. However, ear marking horses was common with the local Indian tribe. Obviously it marred their appearances, so well to do ranchers would not think of that practice.

    Most draft horses were left to roam the sage and rim rocks until haying season which took most of the summer. Then they were brought into a meadow and used hard. I can recall at the crack of dawn herding thirty or so up to the round carrel which had a snubbing post in the center. I had an old rawhide riata with which I would toss a loop over a horses head then lead it up to a stump for me to stand on as I was to short to halter from the ground. The teamsters would be wisecracking from behind the fence. Sadly those days are gone forever. Now it is all fancy mechanized, and very few people.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Hang in there Ontario, you have a new little buckaroo to train. Where I grew up, hard on the Nevada, California border everyone pretty much ran cattle and ranged horses on public land together so ear marks were used. All you had to do was whistle or shout from a distance and when the critters raised their heads you could tell if they were yours, saved covering a lot of ground and eased separating them in the Fall. Our ear marks were a swallow fork in both ears and an under bit in the left. We did not ear mark horses, feeling it made them head shy to bridle. However, ear marking horses was common with the local Indian tribe. Obviously it marred their appearances, so well to do ranchers would not think of that practice.

    Most draft horses were left to roam the sage and rim rocks until haying season which took most of the summer. Then they were brought into a meadow and used hard. I can recall at the crack of dawn herding thirty or so up to the round carrel which had a snubbing post in the center. I had an old rawhide riata with which I would toss a loop over a horses head then lead it up to a stump for me to stand on as I was to short to halter from the ground. The teamsters would be wisecracking from behind the fence. Sadly those days are gone forever. Now it is all fancy mechanized, and very few people.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Thanks, fellas. Very much. I enjoyed reliving those horse days for a bit. Guess you could tell. I do miss it. The hard thing about living the dream is having it end. Difficult to look ahead when what's behind was so wonderful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pray- hunt-work
    replied
    A split eared horse with a slice in just one ear was considered to be a bronco under saddle, a horse with a split in each ear is just plain dumb. It was a method for wrangling cowboys to figure which mount he wanted for the ride.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    P-h-w
    I think that's pretty much what I said, without all the foo-fa-raw!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Pray, do explain the split-eared horse. I haven't peeked. Am guessing it's one that has to be twitched every time it's saddled? (Hence the biting-the-ear type twitch sometimes used - but I'm not sure how successfully - in situations where a lip twitch isn't available. I was trained how to twitch with the tool but never used one outside of that. I could incapacitate a horse if it was an emergency and horse's health depended on it. But as far as I'm concerned nags that require twitching for any other reason (e.g. shoeing) should go to the glue factory.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    At least we agree on the pedigree crap. My pinto packhorse was a mongrel (putting it mildly!) but she loved to work no matter what was on the agenda. She was a fabulous cow horse but, alas, her confirmation (or is it conformation?) was absolutely horrible. Straight up pasterns and she paddled badly. Would have been a miserable ride if she'd had some shock absorbers but without them I needed superglue to keep my eyeballs in place. A day in the saddle with her was quite punishing. But man could she move the cows! I wouldn't let her do it very often though because I knew if I did it would break her down. Or it would break me down! However, packing was good work for her and she lasted till she was nearly twenty-five which surprised me greatly. Gad, that old gal would do everything to help get a load on and if one was shifting on her, I knew about it instantly. She'd come up and about push me and the riding horse off the trail. "Get this damned mess fixed! Now!"

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    At least we agree on the pedigree crap. My pinto packhorse was a mongrel (putting it mildly!) but she loved to work no matter what was on the agenda. She was a fabulous cow horse but, alas, her confirmation (or is it conformation?) was absolutely horrible. Straight up pasterns and she paddled badly. Would have been a miserable ride if she'd had some shock absorbers but without them I needed superglue to keep my eyeballs in place. A day in the saddle with her was quite punishing. But man could she move the cows! I wouldn't let her do it very often though because I knew if I did it would break her down. Or it would break me down! However, packing was good work for her and she lasted till she was nearly twenty-five which surprised me greatly. Gad, that old gal would do everything to help get a load on and if one was shifting on her, I knew about it instantly. She'd come up and about push me and the riding horse off the trail. "Get this damned mess fixed! Now!"

    Leave a comment:


  • Pray- hunt-work
    replied
    The term Canter should actually be referred to as off canter as a horse naturally doesn't carry their body straight while cantering. That is why some people refer to a canter as a lope, because canter just doesn't make sense. A horse having the wrong lead (wrong front foot leading the dance) during a canter, can result in an awkward feeling ride for an even semi-experienced rider. One way to fix a crossfire, is to lope your horse down a fenceline or wall, keeping the front end into the wall and their hind end into the center of the arena at a lope, to encourage them to follow the right lead. It's an excercise call haunches out. To practice changing to the other very accentuated, you simply switch your inside and outside legs position on the side of the horse and push them through the bit until you receive the opposite lead, or haunches in. Eventually that turns into flying lead changes, and loping sidepasses and the whole works. And Bubba- I could careless about a horse without heart. Bloodlines mean nothing to me except for maybe cowiness.... But even then they don't always result in much.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Also P-h-w
    Most packers (not all!) idea of conformation is one leg under each corner and the ability to convert oxygen to carbon dioxide, hay to horse biscuits and tote a load.
    I've seen show ring champions I wouldn't allow to $h!t in my barn!
    I've had the pleasure of owning some ugly, swaybacked, roman nosed, rag-a-muffin nags that wouldn't be allowed IN a show ring, much less compete, that would give you their heart and soul for the taste of an oat!
    I'll take ol' Ugli anytime!

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    P-h-w

    A cross firing horse ain't necessarily "fixed", but a knowledgeable rider with "horse sense" can correct it when needed.
    "Cross fire" is just as natural a part of a canter (not gallop!) as lead".
    They just naturally "do" it.
    ...and "cross fire" only counts off on the rider, not the horse. Proper leg cues at the proper timing in the gait prevents "cross fire".

    Cross fire: when a horses rear end "lead" doesn't match his front end "lead" at the canter .....and no, "packers" couldn't care less about "cross fire".
    It's a "show ring" thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Dallas, most of us don't understand because we do not pack out equipment and game on horses or mules.

    Reading comments from Bubba and Ontario is like watching two Grand Masters playing chess.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Happy, I'm sure I duplicated that hitch bringing out my first bull elk on rented horses without a guide. I guess the lodge owner was reasonably impressed with my determination, especially given the gawdawful location where I dropped that old boy. Ordinarily Rhoda wouldn't rent horses out to just anybody and, one would think, certainly not a kid who just turned nineteen. But she knew the country where I shot that elk and in hindsight I think she just wanted me to leave a trail so her guides could find out how to get up in there. That whole drainage was full of elk. She sure was impressed that I could have even got myself up into that hole to shoot something. It took three trips and two weeks to get that bull all out. Not sure who was happier me or her when I finally showed up late at night at the lodge with the rented horse and the last two quarters. Anyway, earlier that night as I was coming down the mountain I could see the headlights from the wrangler's truck where he was waiting at the spot I'd been dropped off. I made sure I put the horse onto the road a ways away so I could discreetly unload that meat without a genuine packer viewing my particular version of the "spider hitch." Took three attempts to get it loaded by myself. Then I was all done for. Good thing that mess hung together. A few weeks later I was in the Army. When I got out three years later I decided I wasn't going to duplicate that near disaster again. Bought my own animals, trailer, and tack and a copy of Back's book. Then I enrolled in a class. No substitute for experienced instruction.

    Leave a comment:

Welcome!

Collapse

Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

Right Rail 1

Collapse

Top Active Users

Collapse

There are no top active users.

Right Rail 2

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Right Rail 3

Collapse

Footer Ad

Collapse
Working...
X