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Another BS advertisement. Too bad these outfits can't get someone who has a clue to do their photography. See the first post.

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  • Another BS advertisement. Too bad these outfits can't get someone who has a clue to do their photography. See the first post.

    Another BS advertisement. Too bad these outfits can't get someone who has a clue to do their photography. See the first post.

  • #2
    Received Cabela’s fall catalogue the other day. Not sure how they got my address but that’s okay. Anyway, page 123 has a full page ad for Cabela’s T.A.G.S guide service. It shows some guy riding a horse in a river which by the look of the alkali in the cutbanks is probably in the Missouri Breaks. He’s pulling a packhorse loaded with elk. Or seems to be anyway. The tack all looks grungy and well-used. That’s good. Even appears to have a decker saddle which would be what most respectable packers would prefer (carries heavier loads safer than a sawbuck). The panniers are not what I would prefer because meat shifts around too much, but a lot of guys use them. The rest is all wrong. The dude is dressed entirely in camo. Not a good plan when you’re riding a horse in hunting season, especially when the pack horse is a palomino! He appears to have a backpack on (also stylishly camo). He should be wearing hunter orange which I’m sure is required just about everywhere (the vegetation indicates this “hunt” was likely too late for archery season). You’d think he’d stuff that pack in the duffle on the horse. He appears to be wearing hiking boots in leather bound stirrups. Not a good plan! Too hard to get them out in a hurry. If he’s going to wear hiking boots, he should be using bare wood and metal overshoe stirrups. And finally and most importantly that elk rack is going nowhere like that. I’m surprised it stayed on long enough for the photo op! It’s lashed on with a long chunk of bungee cord which might be okay except that the stuff will never hold a knot more than a few minutes. The rack is perched on a piece of a snag with a duffle bag underneath to keep it away from the horse’s butt. Very good … except that the horns aren’t tied to the snag and the snag isn’t fastened to anything! It’s just laying up there. The snag will flip off and those antlers will roll into the side of that horse within twenty steps! I am critical of this kind of thing because people look at this crap and think that’s the way they are supposed to do it. And then they get hurt. Or a nice elk rack gets smashed to pieces.

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    • #3
      I should also explain that if the horns aren't lashed TIGHTLY to the snag, it will very quickly rub off the natural dark color where it rests against the antler beams. NO outfitter would have rigged them up like that! He could get sued for damaging the trophy unnecessarily. And he should! I always put some kind of padding between the cross-beam support and the antlers just to be sure. Actually, sponges used for cleaning camp cooking utensils work great.

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      • #4
        Wow! I learned a ton just from your critique of one picture. I can't imagine what it would be like to hunt with you. I know there is a lot more to an enjoyable elk hunt than pulling the trigger and that is why I appreciate your comments! I think I am about ready to pull the trigger but the rest still scares me at this point. I just know that there is a lot I don't know. I'll do my best to keep learning and I know I will enjoy the beauty of Montana no matter what. Thanks for more great advice!

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        • #5
          Wow! I learned a ton just from your critique of one picture. I can't imagine what it would be like to hunt with you. I know there is a lot more to an enjoyable elk hunt than pulling the trigger and that is why I appreciate your comments! I think I am about ready to pull the trigger but the rest still scares me at this point. I just know that there is a lot I don't know. I'll do my best to keep learning and I know I will enjoy the beauty of Montana no matter what. Thanks for more great advice!

          Comment


          • #6
            Lately advertising has been a little humerous. On the TV shows, they now integrate the advertising into the script (besides providing you 10 minutes of commercials for every five minutes of actioin).

            The bow hunter is sitting in a pop-up blind with a 15 yard shot in head to foot camo (which no one outside the blind could see). He pulls up binoculars, carefully panning the name in front of the camera. He probably doesn't even have a 15 yard focus. Then he pulls up his range finder and nails the distance deadly accurate at 15 yards. He pulls up his arrow and checks the mechanical broadhead in front of the camera. Then he turns his hat around placing the logo on the front. As he draws on the poor deer that just came to get a drink from the farm watering tank, they pan to his boots and his parka and his sun glasses. It never stops... these things are getting almost as funny as Leave It to Beaver in the old days.

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            • #7
              Dakota, pick up Joe Back's "Horses, Hitches, and Rocky Trails." You can order a copy from Amazon. That old boy knew a lot! A great read with lots of funny stuff as well as tons of essential information. And his pen and ink illustrations are real artwork. Get the hard cover if you can as it will hold up better for backcountry use. The book is small enough to fit in a saddlebag. Old Joe had his thinking cap on even when he designed the book's dimensions.

              I wish I could be there to help out but that doesn't seem likely. Still trying to settle my wife's fatal car accident litigation and court has scheduled mediation for October 29th. I was not kept in the loop on that scheduling and I am PISSED!

              Comment


              • #8
                Who gave OHH a -1? I didn't see anything wrong with his post!
                Anyway I am in agreement about advertisements, some of the things they portray are ridiculous, like bow hunters standing up and drawing a bow in a treestand without a safety harness on, this gives new hunters an idea that hunting without a harness is a good thing.
                Dakota, advertisements on TV and movies ARE ridiculous, when a company pays ginormous amounts of money for a popular show to use their products it just shows me how gullible the John Q. Public really is.

                Drink Coke-a-Cola!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sorry, had to say it!

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                  • #10
                    You make me laugh OHH. Still grinding that axe for Cabelas.

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                    • #11
                      I second Ontario's recommendation of Joe Backs book Horses, Hitches, and Rocky Trails. It is a good read even if you never plan on packing a horse. Many nice hunting recollections and sound advice. His art work is icing on the cake. I had my pack string for many years before I ran across his book and learned plenty. Kindest Regards

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                      • #12
                        Jay, not really grinding the ax. Recall that a while back I was critical of F&S for a magazine cover with similar phony horse packing scene (but was much worse than Cabela's ad). Turns out it was not F&S but cover for the other Bonier publication. Anyway, this had nothing to do with my ax to grind with Cabela's over other issues. I cited this example by name because I'm pretty sure just about everyone on here is on Cabela's mailing list and could take a look in the flyer to see what I was talking about.

                        Country boy: As far as the minus slinging, I got over being bothered by that a long time ago. There's two guys on here who will tag a minus on anything I post no matter what the subject. No sense in us getting upset about a couple of adults who'll never grow up and act their age.

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                        • #13
                          [Blank]

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                          • #14
                            Thanks guys! I appreciate the advice and will order Joe Back's book. I'm in hot pursuit of information at this point and appreciate the recommendation from guys who know the trail. If you guys have seen something worth reading, I'll sure get it as I respect your insight immensely.

                            OH... sorry to hear that you might not be in Montana for elk season. I was looking forward to meeting you in person. Best of luck in your legal matters.

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                            • #15
                              Nah, DMc! That'd be me Honk's referring to!
                              BTW Honk, I slung ya one two posts above. The other'n ain't mine.
                              Ya see Honk, I follered a "shoer" around from about age 5 'til I got outta skool a couple yers later. I've been bit, kicked, bucked, rolled on, fallen on, stepped on by shod and barfooted cayuse's!
                              I've pulled a couple fum the you-ter-us and even shoveled dirt over one of 'em nearly 30 years later. I've layed hands on everthang fum mega dollar racers to two bit, spavined, knock-kneed jayhonker.
                              Now, I ain't never run no pack strang, but I rode the sweetest little "grulla" mare fum Vallecito Resv into the Needle Mts n back. We dint kill no elchs, but we had a blast. Hell! Even helped load panners! Injun feller even showed me a "diamond" hitch. Said they wuden worth crap-o-la, but they impressed the clientele! LOL!
                              Yep! Magazine ads! Wonder if them fellers on Madison Ave have any ideer why a cowboys mounts and dismounts on the "on" side?
                              Oh! Honk! Did'ja know horses have horns n' some even have feathers?

                              ...and evertime I heer a jackass like you bray, I get homesick! LOL!

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