Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What calibers do you know of that can shoot big game up to and including moose and black bears, and then with sub-100gr bullets

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Good comments Safado! Those are some excellent examples of crossover cartridges (except for the .240). If you only have one rifle, they will work within reasonable ranges. It is certainly nicer to always have the right club for the situation though. And I agree with WAM in that most of us like to have a driver, just in case a 9 iron is not enough. Why not if you can afford it!

    Some famous golfer once said, "Drive for show; putt for dough"! Being reared on a 25-06, I've always said, "Shoot a magnum for show; hit a fatal location for dough"! At least three of the four crossover cartridges you named would poke a hole through an elk's heart or lungs at 250 yards if the hunter could just hit them. There is a mistaken belief among many hunters that if the hunter shoots the elk in the foot (or the gut, or any non-fatal location) by accident that the magnum will fatally injure it. This just isn't the case. I've spent many hours helping such hunters track down their wounded prey, whether the quarry was a fox, coyote, antelope, mule deer, etc.

    Each shot a hunter takes, they must first make certain they can hit a fatal location. Next, they must make sure their bullet has enough terminal energy to deck their quarry at its specific distance. If these two are a go, the shot is ethical, regardless of caliber or distance. I call this hunting within your limitations and our limitations are not all the same; they have to do with knowledge, practice, composure under stress, experience and self-control.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Safado has a good point - the small or medium bores seem to be able to get both jobs done.
    I have a picture of me in front of a standing black bear mount that the guy followed out of town and got with one shot from a .257roberts. I am 6'1 and the bear makes me look like a midget. Do not remember the weight, but it was a big one.
    I get good results with light bullets from the 6.5 swede on varmints and would have no qualms shooting a black bear with the 160gr. The Swede has more energy at 100yds than the 30-30 has at the muzzle.
    There were also the Remington Accelerators years back but I had minimal experience with them. Some people had good results. They were available in 30-30, 30-06 and shot a 55gr .223 bullet in a sabot.

    Leave a comment:


  • WA Mtnhunter
    replied
    LOL, I like the driver and 2 iron!

    Leave a comment:


  • 99explorer
    replied
    I like the golf club analogy. Every shooter should have a battery of guns, each dedicated to a particular purpose with no compromises made in reduced effectiveness at the ends of the spectrum.

    Leave a comment:


  • Safado
    replied
    The calibers that I think answer the question are all small bores: 6.5 Swede,.257 Weatherby, 25-06 and .264 Win Mag. I don't own any of these by the way. A long time ago I too bought into the one rifle fits all philosophy my budget probably contributed to that line of thinking. Then I realized game are like golf shots you need a different club for different holes! Plus its more fun. My 22LRs are only used for target shooting, 22-250s are used strictly for paper targets and varmints, .240 Weatherby is used for pronghorn only, .308 W or .270 W for deer and 30-06 for deer and bigger.

    Leave a comment:


  • WA Mtnhunter
    replied
    Happy & Dakota
    No argument from me on the merits of the .25-06 Rem. Even it's younger cousin, the .257 Roberts, is adequate for large deer on down to sod poodles and rock rats.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Dakota,
    Well written, but I think what WAM is hinting at is attempting to hunt everything large and small with one caliber is not a good idea. Not even fair to the animals. You are a superb marksman and rifle technician, if anyone could do it, it would be you. Yet you indicate you would use different calibers.
    I love the 25-06, have taken antelope, deer, elk, and varmints with it. Animals elk size and larger deserve a larger caliber, you know that. Those who insist on one size fits all, should limit their animal size. Also practice more, that helps ability to handle recoil, and accuracy.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    The 25-06 IS quite a versatile cartridge. It is superior to the 22-250 and .220 Swift for long range varmints and it HAS taken state record elk. It is my personal first choice for antelope and deer after trying and/or witnessing (in action) almost EVERY cartridge for 50 years.

    That being said, I'll be carrying a .300 Dakota for elk and backing it up with a 30-06 (or maybe even a .375 H&H at times). That is simply to add capability for additional range should I need it. If I see an elk I really want at 500 yards, I don't want to be carrying one of my trusty 25-06s because I wouldn't take the shot.

    If you could guarantee me that I would see my trophy bull at 250 yards or less, I'd choose a 5 1/2 pound 25-06 every time. I wouldn't care if the bull was running at top speed or posing for a picture. He would be harvested and his carcass would have both an entry and exit wound.

    Although I've never yet shot an elk, I've spent at least 40 hours of my life within 200 yards of some of the biggest bulls in America (observing). I have lots of friends and family that hunt elk all the time. They are beautiful and resilient beasts but none of them wears Kevlar or has the three inch thick leathery shield that a Russian boar carries. I have confidence in my beliefs as a result of extensive penetration testing across many of these cartridges, elk observation, and many years of field experience with other game.

    I agree wholeheartedly with WAM that there is no one crossover cartridge that is the world's best for each species from p-dogs to Grizz. However, if I could only afford one rifle, it would be a 25-06. The ability to shoot thousands of rounds in low recoil varmint hunting/target shooting conditions will make you a SHOOTER. If you become a SHOOTER, know your limits, and hit your intended game where you should, you will be successful. With the composition of today's best bullets, penetration is no longer such an issue. I am however quite curious to see how a grizz would respond to a 115g Barnes TTSX going 3100 fps. I has got to hurt and render an amazing amount of hydrostatic shock. I would expect a complete pass though in spite of that Kevlar-like hair.

    Leave a comment:


  • WA Mtnhunter
    replied
    No such thing as a crossover big game and varmint class rifle. About like calling "crossover" SUV's an off-road all-terrain vehicle that is great on the highway. What you end up with is something that is not very good at either. Maybe any of the .257 bores for varmints and deer, but moose and elk? Come on, now get real!

    Leave a comment:


  • mike0714
    replied
    the 6.5 swede is a great round for big game but the whole crossover cartridge is not really practical. I agree with Dakota the only cartridge that can really be described as a crossover round. Yes you could probably take elk, moose, or bears with one but I would want a bigger caliber. I would want the extra range and knock down power. I really like my .284 win for all big game. I can load a 100 grain bullet for coues deer and varmints or i can load 168 grainers for elk and bear. I usually just stick to the 168 grain bullets because yotes die the same no matter the bullet and i can often hunt deer, lions, and bear all at one time.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Your 6.5 Swede has an outstanding reputation in taking large game, especially in Europe. I'd hazard a guess that more elk/caribou sized game has been taken with that cartridge over the last 120 years in the Scandanavian countries than with any other cartridge. It has no problem! It is handier on the high end of hunting though. You will find that the recoil for lots of varmint hunting is a little nasty for a 300 round day at a p-dog town. You will also begin to notice that 3200 fps is not nearly as flat shooting as something pushing 4000 fps.

    I'm quite happy with my 25-06s as highly effective cross over rifles. It is a top contender on p-dogs with 75g bullets going 3750 fps. Many who have not shot one still believe that you have to have at least a 180g bullet to penetrate and that the "little" bullets fragment easily. This is just not the case.

    I've shot that particular crossover cartridge a lot over the last 45 years and have witnessed over five feet of penetration through a big buck using a 100g Hornady Interlock bullet (8 separate crushed bones including one pelvis).

    In an extensive penetration test I conducted using 1/2 inch thick T-1 steel plates at 100 yards (numerous cartridges including .223, .220 Swift, .243, 25-06, 6.5 Carcano, .308, .270, 30-30, .308, 30-06, .375 H&H,12 gauge slug, and more). The 25-06 was the only one to completely penetrate the steel plate. There are those who say the .25-06 won't penetrate the shoulder of an elk. They have obviously never tried it because there is no doubt that a good 115-120g bullet will fully penetrate an elk with no problem given proper range (just like the 6.5 Swede).

    They don't carry the range that the .300 Win carries for this bigger game but there is no doubt a moose will not survive a shot from either at reasonable range and is also likely to drop faster with a given hit than they will with a 30-06.

    Now a .375 H&H seems to kill beyond reason and it beat everything else I tested on all other penetration tests; but it is a load on a prairie dog town. Enjoy your Swede. I contend you will love it more every year you own it and by the time you are 70, it is likely you won't pick up a big magnum cartridge ever again.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    I taken two moose up in N.W.Canada with my 7mm-08 using 162Gr ammo by Hornady and my French Guide uses a Old Savage 99 in 308 with 40+ kills under his belt, Its all in Bullet Placement and Range both were taken just under 100Yd....So your 6.5x55 is a CAN-DO...JMO

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Downsizing a large caliber to shoot varmints is never an issue. Upsizing a small caliber to take larger big game is a different matter. I have my hands full killing moose with 190 gr 30-06. Wouldn't think of using what your shooting. Nope.

    Leave a comment:


  • What calibers do you know of that can shoot big game up to and including moose and black bears, and then with sub-100gr bullets

    What calibers do you know of that can shoot big game up to and including moose and black bears, and then with sub-100gr bullets and reduced loads take varmints. I think my 6.5X55 Swede with my hand loads can handle both. What do you think are the true 'crossover' calibers??

Welcome!

Collapse

Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

Right Rail 1

Collapse

Top Active Users

Collapse

There are no top active users.

Right Rail 2

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Right Rail 3

Collapse

Footer Ad

Collapse
Working...
X