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Going to show my ignorance a little but that is not unusual nor rare. I know that prairie dogs are grouped with squirrels as sm

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  • Going to show my ignorance a little but that is not unusual nor rare. I know that prairie dogs are grouped with squirrels as sm

    Going to show my ignorance a little but that is not unusual nor rare. I know that prairie dogs are grouped with squirrels as small game. I know that there are those that hunt them for sport. My question is are they edible and how would they be prepared for the pot?

  • #2
    Well they aren't poisonous, and they're made of meat (although there's not much of it on them), so I suppose you could eat them, and I guess that makes them edible.

    That being said, I've never heard of anyone eating them, and they have so many diseases that I'd have to be on the edge of starvation before I would touch them.

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    • #3
      I think I heard somewhere that they carry a disease of some kind.

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      • #4
        They are known carriers of the bubonic plague. Hundreds of cases have been reported from Colorado in the past fifty years, some of them attributable to handling the dead rodents.

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        • #5
          Okay. I was born and raised in AR so not familiar with the critters at all. Good to know they are off limits for me.

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          • #6
            I would imagine they would taste like sage since they are in the stuff all the time.

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            • #7
              Some colonies have the plague bacteria. The primary way it is transmitted to humans or other animals is through flea bites, although it’s possible to become infected through contact with blood, etc. Otherwise, it is not a food-safety hazard. As long as the meat is cooked, it is safe to eat, and prairie dogs are edible. I’ve never been tempted to cook one. Most places that have prairie dogs also have rabbits, which I suspect are better table fare.

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              • #8
                Might as well eat field mice and rats...

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                • #9
                  Pneumonic plague is a more insidious threat than the flea-transmitted bubonic plague. And, yes, vermin and rodents are also prime carriers. It is transmitted via the air (yikes!).

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                  • #10
                    Almost any animal that has fur could have the Yersina Pestis bacteria. Most cases in U.S. (10 to 15/year) are in N. New Mexico, Arizona and S. Colorado from the Rock Squirrel carrier. The second location is California and S. Oregon from the California Ground Squirrel.
                    The Deer Mice and Voles support a population of the fleas but they are not considered significant harm to humans and do not kill the host - kind of like a carrier.
                    Precautions - do not touch dead rodents.

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                    • #11
                      A excellent book I remember from the early '70's; North American Game Animals written by Leonard Lee Rue, had at the end of each animal profile, a paragraph on the animal's table fare (as it was called). I believe it gave the prairie dog a ''earthy dry, not very good'' rating. The eastern woodchuck and the western marmot was given a very good rating, if I remember correctly. I do like woodchuck, very tasty.

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                      • #12
                        I think I'd get hungry for rats and mice before I'd get hungry for p-dogs. I vaporize most that I shoot but there is usually enough left that eagles and hawks follow me around as I hunt them.

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                        • #13
                          They are killed as vermin, though in a sporting long range way. They are the original reactive target. When used as a small target for high powered rifle practice they explode into a pink mist. They are killed because their holes cause cattle to break their legs and die a lingering and wasteful death. Beef cattle are good to eat, so we shoot prairie dogs for the sake of our beef.

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                          • #14
                            Nasty. Don't even think about it.

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