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I just checked my first trailcamera. All i got besides the pics of me sticking my face in front to check if it was working, was

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  • I just checked my first trailcamera. All i got besides the pics of me sticking my face in front to check if it was working, was

    I just checked my first trailcamera. All i got besides the pics of me sticking my face in front to check if it was working, was a single duck. Most of the pics looked like a tree branch or small bird set it off. My question is, when you set out your cameras, how often do you get a pic worthwhile?

  • #2
    if you know where to put a camera you should leave it sit for a week and always have at least some pictures of the species you are targeting. if not your camera is not in the right spot.

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    • #3
      I get real good shots sometimes but usually its a bust. I get my best pics in late summer and few this time of year. I've learned to conceal the camera and to not have it facing the rising/setting sun. I've had 2 cameras out all winter with no good pics since January. But its a fun way to see wildlife in an area.

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      • #4
        I get great trail camera pics all the time. Even placed in a few contests...if you want to improve your ability to get good photos, I highly recommend you get the book Deer Cameras by the QDMA (www.qdma.com/shop/deer-cameras-the-science-of-scouting-by-qdma). That book is littered with great tips for trail camera users.

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        • #5
          Bioguy01~ +1
          Good Info, on setting up your Trail Camera.

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          • #6
            To get good pictures year round you need to really scout out signs before you put scouting cameras out, if that makes sense. Animals move pretty regular patterns from feeding to resting/bedding areas. These change depending on the season, weather, and things like hunting pressure.

            I keep my cameras out year round and check/move them about every 10 days to 2 weeks. I try to target trails, old roads, and fields that show signs of movement or feeding. These aren't the same now as summer which isn't the same as hunting season.

            It will probably take you a while to figure out the patterns of wildlife in your area. Once you do, you should get some photos fairly often.

            To get better photos, watch for obstructions, location of the sun, and distance. There's also a difference, I think, between putting a camera out for good photos and for scouting. When I'm scouting deer, I put the camera back further and up higher overa trail or feeding area. If I put it over a scrape or rub, I turn the flash off. (If the scrape is used only at night, why hunt it). I try to do everything I can to make sure the deer I'm hunting don't know the camera or I'm there. Deer do see the infrared flashes. There's a big debate on whether they spook deer. I try not to take the chance.

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            • #7
              It depends on how sensitive your trail camera is. I have a Wildgame Innovations that is not sensitive at all, and only takes pictures of deer and other large animals. I had borrowed my uncle's Primos cam and that took pictures of squirrels, rabbits, and pretty much anything that moved. Even had a picture of a mouse haha.

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              • #8
                My cameras are out 24 hours a day seven days a week. Use bait in front of your camera and also use natural camo around the camera. Like pine branches and tree limbs. Good Luck.

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