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what wood would be best for building steps to put on a tree for a tree stand pressure treated or some hardwood water wood seal p

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  • what wood would be best for building steps to put on a tree for a tree stand pressure treated or some hardwood water wood seal p

    what wood would be best for building steps to put on a tree for a tree stand pressure treated or some hardwood water wood seal product?

  • #2
    I think the tree would rather you bought a ladder stand and avoided nailing anything into it. Putting nails into a tree can be a route for disease and parasites to enter, possibly leading to its demise.

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    • #3
      For lock-on type stands I've created my own 2x4 ladders. I usually try to hunt around 15ft high, so I buy treated 2x4's that are 16ft long. Build the rungs out of treated 2x4's. I use 3.5 inch screws that are designed for treated lumber and exterior use. Nails rust and will eventually pull out unless you get stainless ringshanks. I build ladder at the cabin or at home and drag it to where I want with a 4 wheeler. I have my own ground so I just leave the ladder there all year. I typically buy clearanced stain at one of the big box stores and spray the ladders down using a cheap garden sprayer and then dispose of after use; they aren't worth trying to save. The ladders make accessing the stands much easier and safer. I use a chain binder to attach the top of the ladder to the tree. Every spring I will take the ladder down, spray and then bind back up. Don't leave the ladder bound to the tree for years, the tree will eventually grow over the chain and binder.

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      • #4
        Gavin
        I have built a lot of permanent tree stands on my own land - save yourself some trouble and get a good metal ladder stand. The wood ones only last a few years, including the steps. Sometimes the tree gets damaged by high winds and tears the stand apart.
        A metal stand will last a long time if taken care of.

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        • #5
          I would not use nails and steps on the tree itself. Nails do rust and the steps have a tendency to twist when weight is applied to one side when your climbing, creating a slipping accident. If you must go with wood take Jay's advice. In either case, wood or metal, careful maintenance is a must.

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          • #6
            I would suggest using winders or ladder sticks. I built a lot of homemade stands a long time ago and even pressure treated wood weakens and you don't want to be taking chances 20 feet in the air.

            I agree that a metal ladder stand or lock-on is your safest and easiest option. In any case, any stand left in the field year-round must be inspected thoroughly prior to using it.

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            • #7
              I don't know the details of the rig you're working on, but from someone who loves to take the DIY route more than I probably should, spring for the fixed ladder stand. You might have sticker shock and think you can do better, but you'll probably end up spending close to the same cost on materials as you would for a basic stand at a good deal, not to mention the time saved, free safety harness, and peace of mind you get with a store bought.

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              • #8
                I would buy one too. I have made stands before but they don't last long. If you really want to make your own, learn how to weld. Welding has many uses and its a good skill to learn.

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                • #9
                  I would steer away from wood period. #1 reason wood is extremely slippery when wet. As others have mentioned nailing into trees can be the demise of the tree, wood isn't always cheapper, they don't last long, with many other problems to mention. At the beginning of the hunting season Dicks Sporting goods run specials all the time, this year they had 16' of strap on ladders for $64 out the door without the ratchet straps. Much cheaper and easier in the end.

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                  • #10
                    Hi...


                    I find it impossible to dispute any of these posts...!!

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