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Have you been injured while hunting or fishing? Bad fall, twisted ankle, broken bone, branch fall on your head, hypothermia, he

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  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Gary, the cornea is the outer layer over the lens. I once scratched mine when I fell on a stick fighting wildfire. Just like you, it required some drops and wearing a patch for a couple of days. Painful at the time but okay after a few days. The retina is the layer INSIDE the eyeball that receives light patterns and transmits them to optic nerve attached at back of eyeball. Damage to retina is usually referred to as "tears" and will usually become a detachment if not treated quickly. The detachment occurs when vitreous fluid inside the eye works through the tear and bubbles the retina away from the sclera, much like water getting underneath wallpaper. A tear must be repaired, usually with laser treatment. You wouldn't forget that! Ugh! Terribly painful. Minor damage to cornea is typically referred to as a "scratch." How do I know all this? Over the last ten years I have had three retina detachments and countless tears in the left eye as well as two retinal tears in the right eye. Required three major surgeries and I don't remember how many laser patch jobs. Painful? Actually, the damage is spontaneous and painless. The treatment though ... I think I'm going to have to pop a Valium just thinking about it!

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  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Ontario, It was a long time ago but I am almost positive the Doctor said I "scratch the retina". There some things in life, you don't forget. How many times do you go to the hospital? I remember every visit to the emergency ward.

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  • Gary Devine
    replied
    O.H., maybe you’re right but it was a bad scratch. I even got headaches afterwards. Were you my Canadian Doctor that day? Only kidding!
    Thank you for that point of information.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Gary, you scratched your cornea, not the retina. Would have required a serious puncture of the sclera (eyeball) to "scratch" a retina. After what I have been through the last couple of weeks, take my word for it, I know what I'm talking about!

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  • jhjimbo
    replied
    I was fishing in Lake Erie, not far from the Canadian boundary and happened to be alone. I put on some sun screen and the sweat carried it down into my eyes. Completely blinded me for about an hour or more.
    Scouting for deer hunting, i tripped and fell in a stump that had been shaped to a point by a beaver. It hit my ribs in my side and my full weight fell on it. Almost knocked me out. I was able to get out and make it home on my own. Nothing broken buy i did learn weeks later after the oxycoden(sp) wore off that it knocked a vertebrate out of place in my spine.

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  • Gary Devine
    replied
    I was smacked by a tree branch across the eye. I tried to walk it off but my eye kept watering. Couple hunting buddies took me to my first Canadian hospital. Scratched the eye retina and wore an eye patch all week. My Canada hunt was over.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    "word", should read world in first line. Sorry.

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  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Yes. If one hunts hard and often in crazy places around the word occasionally things are bound to happen. A few example include:
    ..in Alaska, stuck on a ledge next to a river in Alaska for several days after a glacier partially collapsed flooding river

    ..a brief stay in hospital in Winhoek, Namibia after a leopard mauling

    ..several days in Kampala, Uganda hospital. Stomache blockage and acute dehydration

    ..British Columbia my saddle horses feet flew out from under it on ice hidden under snow crashing me into a rock breaking three ribs. Still took a Stone sheep and a Mountain caribou

    ..serious confrontation with Ethiopian nomads

    Confrontation with professional poachers in Zambia

    ..ran into a half dozen Sudanese chaps with rocket launchers, grenades, machine guns while they were chopping tusks out of a cow elephant in C.A.R.

    There have been some other misadventures that have slipped my mind

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    I was crossing a small wooden bridge in the Adirondacks in early AM and there was a thin sheet of black ice on it. I went down and fell in my rifle stock cracking it and breaking a finger on my hand. Kept on hunting but did not get anything.

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  • Treestand
    replied
    I had to help my hunting buddy while "Grouse" hunting, he got hit in the eyes by a pine branch(bleeding over the left eye and Damage the right eye ball), That ended our hunt, we went to a local M.D. in this small town in up-State NY.After that I drove him Home and pick up his son go back to pick his truck,and I finish with my hunt(3)in the bag.

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  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    I had an argument with my horse on a trail in NW Montana around 1981 I think. It was early season elk hunt and I spotted five tracks crossing the trail which marked the boundary of the legal hunting district. I got off, tied the horse, and chased the tracks a bit but they kept going the wrong direction so I returned to the horse to continue on to the basin I had intended to hunt. United her and headed up the trail but she figured the routine was when I finished hunting we returned to camp. She flipped around the other way and I flipped her back around with a firm slap on the neck. Next thing I knew we were going end over end down the mountain. I stayed in the saddle through one rotation mostly because it happened so fast I couldn't clear the stirrups. She rang my bell pretty good and I never did find my glasses. Also broke my gun in two (see photo in my album). If she'd have broke the saddle I might have killed her! She was my regular pack horse and very good at that job (actually excellent!) so put up with that crap from time to time. But no more! I tied her up with a bowline behind the ears and pounded the crap out of her for twenty minutes or more, screaming obscenities as loud as I could. Never had that problem again. Once in her later years when we were cutting cows she argued with me about leaving the pregnant ones in the calving pasture. She did a bit of a crow hop and I jumped off and waved my finger in her face with some choice words I'm sure she remembered from the mountain trip. My buddy said he'd get another horse for me but I said nope. She won't do anything now. And she didn't. That gal loved to work but a little too much.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1ojolsen
    replied
    One time I had a bad fall, twisted my ankle, got a broken bone when a branch fell on my head, which lead to hypothermia, heat exhaustion and low blood sugar. Bad day.

    Leave a comment:


  • scratchgolf72
    replied
    i was hunting opening day of bow season 2 years ago in MI. weather was brutal, wind gusts were out of control. i got up in the stand about 45 minutes before daylight and it was like being on a roller coaster in the dark. bout 10 minutes before shooting hours a pretty good size branch broke off above me and clocked me right in the head. no injury, but a good scare and a nice headache...that mornign pretty much summed up that deer season as well!

    Leave a comment:


  • mike0714
    replied
    Hyperthermia 2 years ago. I had not had enough to drink and was on an early season archery deer hunt in southern az 100+ degrees out. If my friend had not been there to help me get me cooled down it could have been a lot worse. I vomited for almost an hour and had tremors. He used a tarp to get me shade, gave me water, and walked back to the truck twice to get me more water (the truck was almost a mile away over tough country). If it was not for him I might not be writing this. Now i alway hydrate really well before any hunt, not just drinking water when I start.

    4 years ago had a pretty good fall down a hillside and cracked two ribs. Not too dangerous just really painful and made the 3 mile hike out seem like 50. And that same year got stuck in a snow storm in northern co on a buddies elk hunt no injuries just a horrible night huddled in a little tent

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    I died of hypothermia hunting elk in 1971. Or at least the doctor who examined me the next day said I should have been dead. I just finished another similar story on another thread this evening. Only one a day.

    Leave a comment:

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