Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Here is somthing that I have always wondered. If there is a dangerous game animal in your area like a bear or mountain lion, bu

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Here is somthing that I have always wondered. If there is a dangerous game animal in your area like a bear or mountain lion, bu

    Here is somthing that I have always wondered. If there is a dangerous game animal in your area like a bear or mountain lion, but it's illegal to shoot,if you shoot one out of self defense can you take it home and everything?what do you do with it?

  • #2
    No the state will usually take the body and give the meat to homeless banks and food shelters. It is considered evidence in an investigation.

    Comment


    • #3
      And would we be allowed to keep a claw, or a pelt?

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi...


        The only SURE way to get a straight answer is to consult your DEC people in the State(s) you would be referring to.


        DEC laws DO differ from State to State.

        Comment


        • #5
          Here in California, not only is it illegal to kill a mountain lion under any circumstances, you cannot bring one back into the State if taken legally in another State. This regulation applies to pelt,claws, and meat. Mt Lion backstrap is considered by many as a delicacy.

          Comment


          • #6
            It is never a good idea, you will never be able to keep any claws or pelts from it. From what I understand here you better have some type of wounds if you shoot a bear out of season. I have heard a story from several people about a police officer who shot a bear that was inside the city limits while he was on duty. The wild life officer wanted, and there was discussion about ticketing him over it. That's how serious they take shooting one even in self defense. Best bet is don't do it unless it is the last and only choice.

            Comment


            • #7
              Happy you can say that again. Mt Lion is great eating when you get the chance to obtain some. As for incidental kills, which an out of season killing would be, in a self defense situations, the state collects the entire animal for investigation purposes.If you try and take something off the animal,protected or not,you can and will be held responsible for the value of the animal just as if you poached it.So, if you do happen to find yourself in a "LIFE or DEATH" challenge with an animal,notice i said life or death. Meaning if there is any doubt whatso ever that you could have avoided killing said animal.make sure everything is intact on the animal when the DNR officier arrives at the scene and do not in any manner move the animal from where it was killed.That amounts to unauthorized removal of a dead animal and carries a pretty stiff fine. Don't ask how I know this,I just do.lol

              Comment


              • #8
                I think that if a state allowed people to keep the carcass or parts of any animal they say they killed in self-defense, there would be a lot more of them killed for their trophy parts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  In New Jersey whenever a black bear breaks into someone kitchen for food, it is considered a Category five bear, and must be killed, immediately. The local police or the Fish and Wildlife employee will shoot the bear dead on sight. The homeowner doesn't get the bear. The state takes the bear carcass back to their lab for research, data and sample testing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You get nothing but a story.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The primal law of nature is self preservation. If I kill an alpha predator in defense of my own life, as is a real possibility whenever I leave the trail head, I am content with surviving the encounter and really do not care what becomes of the remains of what just tried to kill me.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        When I worked in remote camps and we would have to shoot a problem bear, it would be shot flown a good distance away and left. A form would need to me emailed to department of resources and that was about the end of it, no pictures or any parts taken.

                        Comment

                        Welcome!

                        Collapse

                        Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                        If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                        And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                        Right Rail 1

                        Collapse

                        Top Active Users

                        Collapse

                        There are no top active users.

                        Right Rail 2

                        Collapse

                        Latest Topics

                        Collapse

                        Right Rail 3

                        Collapse

                        Footer Ad

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X