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Me, my wife and three kids all love the outdoors, fishing, shooting and archery here in northern Indiana. We would like to start

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  • Me, my wife and three kids all love the outdoors, fishing, shooting and archery here in northern Indiana. We would like to start

    Me, my wife and three kids all love the outdoors, fishing, shooting and archery here in northern Indiana. We would like to start hunting, but none of us have any experience. None of my family or friends growing up hunted. My question is does anyone know of any kind of training available for people starting out? We went to Hunter education for the state, but I am looking for actual field experience. The biggest things are tracking and cleaning. I have offered a few hunters cash or a share in the meat for training, but they usually don't want to be bothered by someone new or don't want more competition. A recent article in F&S; lamented the steady decline of hunters, but I have yet to find any resources available for people to learn, especially kids. Does anyone have any ideas?

  • #2
    you could look it up on google-images, for tracking or carry around a book that has the tracks and the pictures of tracks. and for the rest just keep reading field and stream its like the best hunting magazine. once I started reading it I became a unbeliveably better outdoorsmen.

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    • #3
      Pierce

      The best advice I can give you is “carefully” seek someone that’s been around a long time and buddy up with them hunting.

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      • #4
        I am ashamed that no one wants to help your family. My best advice would to be read alot, everything you can get your hands on. If you have a Bass Pro Shops near you they are always doing seminars. If not ask your local hunting store for help. Hope you can find something.

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        • #5
          Any hunting or fishing clubs in the area? Ducks Unlimited?

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          • #6
            check the states game commision and seee if vthey offer anything, in pa the people mentioned a few things at the end of hunters ed for unexperenced people. also some state and national parks offer things, i was fishin and the park people were showing ssome new hunters and fishers the basics. good luck

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            • #7
              Pierce-
              I have a buddy that lives in Noblesville,Indiana.
              How far is that from you?

              We get together each year for a gathering called,Bowfest.
              We bring food, and have a friendly, all day 3-D shoot.

              Shoot me an e-mail,and I'll hook you up,or you could make the trip down here to northern Kentucky(Greater Cincinnati,Ohio,area)

              [email protected]
              Looking forward to your reply ...
              2Poppa
              D.W.

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              • #8
                Good god man I can't believe that, I'd help you if I lived near just to share in your experience. Get with poppa or just keep talking to other outdoors people. Another idea is to go back to where you took hunter education certification course and explain your dilemma to an instructor. Believe me, he/she will set you up with someone.

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                • #9
                  If I was closer to ya' I'd be glad to help you guys out, but I'd stick with Poppa for a start, after you guys have learned some stuff you can start your own "camp" and have some of us "trade" hunts with you.
                  Us up there, you guys where we live(I'm in Ark.)good luck with this and Poppa DOES know his stuff.

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                  • #10
                    Pack your stuff come on down to Arkansas and I'll put you on a deer, trail, and show you how to clean it. You pay your own way and don't bother about the rest, I'd be happy to take you hunting!

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                    • #11
                      Hunting semiars are great. If you have a Cabels or other big outdoors chain store usally have them on a routine basics. Go and check them out and see what the upcoming semiars. If they don't have a beginners semaiars ask and see if they can book one. Your state department of natural resoures will love to help you out. They want to get people involve in hunting expessily youngsters. Check out the libary or book store. Don't be afraid to ask questions. Good luck to you and your family and welcome to the wonderful world of hunting.

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                      • #12
                        Also watch programs on dicovery channel or shows like that will help you to get a good understanding about animals. Pay attention to things like where they bed,eat and things like that. Go out into the woods and just watch the animals and pay attention how they act. Don't get to close and spook them off. Hope this helps

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                        • #13
                          As all said, finding a buddy who knows the ropes is probably the best way to learn. I would suggest you keep asking and maybe start with a non-demanding question of "Would you be willing to give me advice?" instead of "Will you take me hunting and teach me the ropes?" You will find that one thing will lead to another if you are an appreciative and respectful group. I have found that many seasoned hunters are very reluctant to take on a new hunter if they are not convinced that you are all SAFE. In order to find someone local, you should all exude SAFETY. If you have taken the state hunter training course, they should have taught you all you need to know. Make sure those you ask understand your high regard for safety first and your high regard for them, for wildlife and for the property you hunt. If you can do this, I suspect you can work up to getting help. Also, if you have to, just get out in the woods and read the vast information available on the Web to guide you. For starters, you and your family can really practice the safety principles you have learned. It is not as easy in the field as it is the classroom and you all have to practice it as second nature. For now, the biggest things you need to know regarding tracking and cleaning:
                          1. Tracking: In Indiana, look for heavily used trails especially along streams, fence rows, or in areas where trees and terain funnel traveling deer into a "neck of the funnel" area (e.g. a strip of tree or a fence row between two large timbers). Trails will have lots of easily recognizable tracks and the ground may actually be cut away in spots because of the heavy traffic, much like that cut by car tires on a dirt road. If you can find one of these, hunt overlooking the trail and wait. Intersecting trails are even better. Don't worry too much about tracking wounded deer for now... aim for vitals and you won't have to track wounded deer. A well hit deer leaves a solid blood trail that any of you will be able to follow. You can hone your cripple tracking skills as you go but work to ensure you don't get cripples by aiming a well sighted rifle at the center of the chest.
                          2. Cleaning: Just take care of the baics for now: Get the entrails and lungs/heart out of the deer immediately by cutting the belly from bottom to top including through the first four or five ribs so you can get at the chest cavity. Keep your knife blade in line with the hide, pulling the tissue up away from the entrails as you cut so you don't puncture entrails. Prop the chest cavity open with a stick so that the meat cools as soon as possible. Get it to a butchershop that packages deer. You can read up on the Internet about processing your own deer if you like but it might be best to have one processed by a professional for starters anyway so you see how it is done and get max value out of the meat you have.

                          Good luck and stick with this forum if you have questions... we will all try to help you have a good experience if we can.

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                          • #14
                            Another idea: check out Cabellas or Bass Pro type stores... big sporting goods stores like that... they typically have sessions with pros and classes for rookies... they may be able to help you out with some good training and these will be venues to introducing you to people willing to help or buddy up with you to get started.

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                            • #15
                              if you have a relative or a friend they will usually have no trouble showing you how it works. also DakotaMan has a good point to about going into sporting goods stores for advice.

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