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Im 16 and I just started hunting a couple years ago. I bowhunt with a friend but want to find my own property to hunt, any ideas

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  • Im 16 and I just started hunting a couple years ago. I bowhunt with a friend but want to find my own property to hunt, any ideas

    Im 16 and I just started hunting a couple years ago. I bowhunt with a friend but want to find my own property to hunt, any ideas? And any recommendations for a begnner hunter, because im the only one in my family that hunts?

  • #2
    I know exactly what you mean! I am 20 now but started hunting when I was 13. I am the only one in my family that hunts as well. It's going to be hard because most folks for some reason don't want teenagers hunting by themselves. I guess they think it's a liability. Hunting clubs are going to be hard, most of them require that you hunt with an adult, most won't let you join until you are around 18 or in some cases 21. I would look for local farms or tracks of land for sale or lease. Find out who the owner is and ask if you can hunt the place. They may ask for money or maybe you could swap out hunting rights for work or something like that. Let them know you you are a responsible hunter, most people like and prefer that you hunt with a bow so that's a plus on your part. Best of luck to you and I hope you find a good place to hunt!

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    • #3
      Rabbitpolice had a good point. A lot of the ground I hunt is stuff that I worked for the farmer. At one point I was actually getting paid to run a trap line because they had so many problems. Check with some local farmers or some older hunter that would be willing to help. Groups like pheasants forever are full of older hunter who would love to help out a younger hunter.

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      • #4
        Knock on farmhouse doors, be polite, ask nicely and you never know what can happen. In August I went to a farm 1/2 mile down from my house. I was new and didn't know anyone in town. Not only did I get permission to hunt his 400 acres but he lets me hunt from his stands and this last December he invited me on a 4 day North Dakota pheasant hunting trip with his brother and nephew. Point is you may get shot down but nothing good happens if you never try.

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        • #5
          i think all of them are right
          but talk around to people at school and
          see what they do and ask to go with them
          and knock on people doors and ask if they own any land if they dont ask
          do they know any one around that does
          and if you a deer hunter
          and like hunting small game to ask to hunt small game frist then a year later if you can deer hunt but you
          it has work for me

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          • #6
            Everybody that answered before me told you the same thing I am going to tell you.

            It has gotten tougher over the years to find somebody that will let you hunt for free, especially with people leasing their land for hunting rights. Being sincere and polite will get you a long way when asking permission to hunt. Even if a farmer says no at first, ask him if he needs any help on the farm anyway. Bailing hay is a great time to help out a farmer, if they do square bails, and it's a great way for you to stay in shape during the summer. You work a summer for a farmer and prove how reliable and trustworthy you are, I guarantee he will be glad to give you a chance.

            I remember one time I asked a man to pheasant hunt his place, he told me no right away. I thanked him for his time, but continued to make small talk with him. At the end of the conversation, he told me I could hunt anytime I wanted.

            I also would like to reiterate the comment about a group like Pheasants Forever. I am a Board Member of the one in my area and we put on the largest banquet in MI, with over 600 people in attendance. We put on youth hunts all the time. These groups are a great way to meet people with similar interests.

            Good luck

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            • #7
              Thanks guys for all the suggestions. Im getting my liscense this summer so im gonna be knockin on some doors this summer. Hopefully ill end up in a sweet location and tag a nice buck. Good Luck to all of you!

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              • #8
                First of all, when you do find a place to hunt, scout it intensively as often as you can. Find the trails, the water holes, the fence crossings, the bedding areas, and read the hunting magazines. I didn't start hunting till I was 19 years old, and I'm an old pro now! Read "Shots on Whitetail," which is a classic book about deer hunting, even though it was published right after WWII. But get your property and scout, and when you're not scouting work on your archery skills. And stay motivated. Don't forget to read an awful lot about what to do once you actually have fresh killed venison in front of you! Good luck brother.

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                • #9
                  I started out the same way. Best thing you can do is just go around and ask. Just go someday after school that way your in some decent clothes and ask. You could also try asking to hunt other animals too. Sometimes that will lead up to deer hunting.You'll have a better chance get permission to hunt with the bow as well. Some of the places I have permission to hunt with bow but not rifle. I've also had luck with asking the farmer for names of other people that might let us hunt on their land. Good Luck...

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                  • #10
                    Don't forget to try lottery hunts if your state offers them at times all they cost is a few dollars so its not a huge loss if you dont get picked but keep trying

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                    • #11
                      I will echo all the above but I didn't see this one. Most farmers will need help around the farm during the summer when you are out of school. A few weeks labor could get you a few months in the fall to hunt. I know it would work here. But like everyone else said get out and ask, ask your teachers at school, most of those shop guys and coaches know someone in the community that support youth hunters. Lastly, get involved in Ducks Unlimited, Quail forever, and some of the local clubs in your town. They always need people to help out with fundraisers and such and you will meet the people around you that are interested in the same things you are. Make a few friends and you'll get invited on hunts. Many hunters are just waiting for a young person to ask, you'd be surprised what a little energy and inititive on your part will get you.

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                      • #12
                        oh yeah National Wild Turkey Federation and Elk Unlimitied, just depends on what area of the country you live

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                        • #13
                          Sounds like some good advice has been given. Just be polite and remember that it does not hurt to ask. All they can say is "no" but don't let that discourage you. Just keep asking other people and eventually you will find a place. Good luck to you!!!

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                          • #14
                            I would ask local farmers if you could help them out with deer problems... make sure to do this way before deer season starts and to secure a good relationship with them and even offer to help out if they need it.

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                            • #15
                              Agreed with rabbitpolice88 answer above and A + 1 for you!!!

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