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This is a field dressing question, for those of you out there who don't split the pelvis when field dressing, what tips or techn

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  • #16
    As you all know, I am a tracker and I usually hunt in the snow and cold. Fiddling with string and tying off bungholes in below freezing weather is not a luxury that I can physically mess with when gutting an animal under those circumstances. The job has to be done as quickly as possible so I can get my hands back into gloves (blood and all). I once did a bull elk in eleven minutes flat. It wasn't my animal but it fell dangerously close to a national park boundary (perhaps just over the line) and I wanted to get the heck out of there. The kid had never gutted anything before and this was his first elk. To heck with that! I took his fancy knife, gave him my crappy Old Timer and told him to go fiddle with the ivories while I got the guts out. Had one of the other boys time me. He still didn't have the ivories out when I finished. Left the windpipe in but that was okay under the circumstances. Cut it out when we hung it up a couple hours later.

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    • #17
      the way we do it at our hunting camp is not leave the pelvic bone alone till its aleast hanging, or leave it alone all together. instead cut around the anus and other part (if a doe) (sharp knife works best)a long blade will slice the meat away from the fecal tube, it takes practice but there is no knot tieing involved and the anus is contracted with no excrement escaping

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      • #18
        I do not even open the hide over the pelvis when I field dress. An uneven cut will likely spoil one side of the ham or the other. Once you ream the bung and pull it loose it can be tied in a not to prevent contamination then pull it thru the plevic area.

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        • #19
          Interesting. Maybe my memory isn't so good but I thought the male organs were attached to the hide over the pelvis. It's been a while so maybe I'm wrong but I thought that was the case. You don't remove that stuff?

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          • #20
            There are hunting regulations in some states that require the hunter to preserve evidence of sex on deer carcasses.

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            • #21
              I use a T shaped saw made by Gerber, the whole thing with sheath weighs maybe 4 ounces and is about 5 inches long and makes quick safe work of the pelvic bone.


























              knife and a stick is for cavemen!

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              • #22
                dont use your good knife. Get a crappy old one and a rock and set that thing right on the bone to split the pelvis. Or buy a small saw. thats the easiest way.

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                • #23
                  I don't bother splitting the pelvis either and I also leave the hide on over the pelvis as TrapperVic said. I split the pelvis on my first two deer and haven't bothered since. Not splitting the pelvis saves more meat by protecting the meat with the hide until you can get the animal out of the woods.

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                  • #24
                    i don't tie the poop shoot or split the pelvic bone if i am not in a massive rush to avoid weather or other problems. i skin half of the deer like I'm trying to save the cape then take the front haunch, then back strap then the rear haunch then i do a rip role starting at the first rib closest to the neck you cut the length of the rib all the way around from the collar to the pelvic top then pull the meat off the first rib with a tug then cut the next rib on the bottom side pull meat back like a flap and repeat till u get all the rib meat. last take the neck meat. flip deer and repeat. i do this all with a havalon knife(big scalpel blade) works on everything from 75lbs coues deer to 800 lbs elk. only takes about an hour or two no madder how big the animal. no poop, no hide, no banging on my knives, no problems.

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