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This is a field dressing question, for those of you out there who don't split the pelvis when field dressing, what tips or techn

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  • This is a field dressing question, for those of you out there who don't split the pelvis when field dressing, what tips or techn

    This is a field dressing question, for those of you out there who don't split the pelvis when field dressing, what tips or techniques do you use for getting around it? And is it different for a buck or doe? I'd like to not carry a saw and I always go through the pelvic bone so I'm hoping you all have some good tips for this. Thanks for your help.

  • #2
    When it comes to the pelvic bone being split I like to do as follows. Remove as many entrails as possible before even attempting to split. If possible cut and tie a knot in the lower intestine to contain all fecal matter. Gentley tie off both side before making the cut between the uretha tube the bladder. Again being careful not to expell any urine. A paper towel in this area is nice to have. At this point unless I am miles away from my vehicle I will make the drag/wheel out of the woods. And split the pelvis bone while hanging the animal.Most times I will not field dress in the area I hunt unless it is too hot.It makes for a cleaner animal to drag through the woods and doesn't scent up the area with the smell of death or human odor.I don't recommend leaving an animal closed for hours, but an hour or so doesn't hurt anything. Look how many animals lay dead over night before they even get found and t

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    • #3
      When it comes to the pelvic bone being split I like to do as follows. Remove as many entrails as possible before even attempting to split. If possible cut and tie a knot in the lower intestine to contain all fecal matter. Gentley tie off both side before making the cut between the uretha tube the bladder. Again being careful not to expell any urine. A paper towel in this area is nice to have. At this point unless I am miles away from my vehicle I will make the drag/wheel out of the woods. And split the pelvis bone while hanging the animal.Most times I will not field dress in the area I hunt unless it is too hot.It makes for a cleaner animal to drag through the woods and doesn't scent up the area with the smell of death or human odor.I don't recommend leaving an animal closed for hours, but an hour or so doesn't hurt anything. Look how many animals lay dead over night before they even get found and t

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      • #4
        Sorry for the double. Site seems touchy today. Just make carefull cuts and tie everything off so nothing spills out.

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        • #5
          First, I don't field dress where I hunt. At this point, I can get my 4 wheeler to my deer. All my hunting spots have a gutting cradle. The cradle holds the deer upside down about 34" high. About waist level.
          Do you know what "lopping shears" are? That's what I use to break/cut the aitch bone. Cut carefully down between the back legs until you can feel both sides of the pelvis. Slip the dull, hook end of the shears into the cavity that holds the bladder and snip". Reverse the shears and repeat to completely split the pelvis.
          No sawing! No ruptured bladder! No broken/cut bowel! No urine or feces in the body cavity!

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          • #6
            place your knife on the pelvic bone and whack it with a small log

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            • #7
              place your knife on the pelvic bone and whack it with a small log

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              • #8
                oops

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                • #9
                  My wife bought me the new folding Outdoor Edge flip blade combo for Christmas and it has an outstanding folding saw in the case with the knife. I always split the pelvis when I field dress my deer. Before I got that I carried a folding limb saw for that purpose.

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                  • #10
                    I have a friend in Texas who splits the pelvis using his Schrade folder and a rock. When the blade breaks, Schrade replaces the knife free of charge under its warranty.

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                    • #11
                      I will answer your question since it seems no else can address it without answering a question you didn't ask.

                      Cut around the bung hole. Just that simple. Cut it till it's loose and you can pull the lower intestine through freely. Then pull it back through into the body cavity before you roll the guts out. Just that simple. I do it all the time. If a few turds roll into the pelvic cavity, don't sweat it. Even a fancy butcher is going to throw that piece of bone away. Splitting the pelvis only makes it easier to keep the animal propped open but simply tying the leg up to something will do the same job okay. If you have to drag the thing gutted any distance, you don't want it flopping open any more than necessary anyway.

                      Cutting the pelvis is always taught as a gospel necessity in hunters safety. BS.

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                      • #12
                        Ontario basically summed that up. I always tie off the bung hole so that nothing comes out as I pull it through. Also there is a slight difference between bucks and does in this regard too. I'm not sure if I can accurately describe it without possibly being too graphic for the post so I'll refrain and advise you to search youtube. I'm sure you can come up with something.

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                        • #13
                          I mostly agree with OHH. I don't bother to split the pelvis when field dressing. Like he said, simply cut the anus free from the surrounding tissue until it moves freely.

                          I have to disagree with him, though, when it comes to allowing "a few turds" into the body cavity. I spent my youth working in the family USDA inspected beef slaughter house. Allowing feces to contact meat is NEVER acceptable. If you simply pull the anus/bowel out a few inches and tie it off with a piece of string, you will not have any contamination of the body cavity.

                          If you are determined to split the pelvis, however, before I adopted the above method, I just used my knife. Mine is a very stout, thick blade and I would simply place the edge against the centerline of the pelvis and beat it with the heel of my hand, or in the case of big deer, a stout branch. I used this method on deer up to 220 lbs or so growing up in Illinois, but don't recommend it unless you have a sharpening steel available. It turns your edge something fierce and skinning is no fun if you can't realign the edge.

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                          • #14
                            Dead on, Greenhead! No feces or urine on my meat.
                            Actually, barring a ruptured intestine, I don't wash out my deer. That gets trimmed away during processing.

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                            • #15
                              Heh, heh! Well, Greenhead, if you took a gutshot deer into a USDA slaughterhouse the whole thing would go straight out the back door into the garbage truck! You'll get a lot more "contamination" from a busted intestine than you will from a few compacted turds. Sorry, but that's just the physical truth of the matter. And it is exactly the same kind of "contamination" in both cases. The difference being that one form is liquid and the other is solid. Which do you think is going to do the most "damage"? So we all just throw gut shot animals away (and even a very careful hunter is going to wind up with a busted gut to deal with at some time or another)? Of course not! They're a mess to deal with but wasted meat is usually very minimal. Outside of the tenderloins, which are located well away from the bottom of the digestive tract, there's nothing but bone anywhere close to the pelvic cavity where the turds might get loose. Again, I don't eat bone so I don't worry about it.

                              I have to chuckle about guys who get all squeemish about a turd touching the meat but think nothing of pulling a perforated stomach or intestine or gall bladder out of a deer.

                              As to females, their pelvis is usually so easy to split that I will go ahead and take care of it with a knife and do it that way. Bucks and bulls are the ones that usually are nearly impossible to split without a saw. And if you don't know why, you flunked sex ed.

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