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How far should your feeder be from your hunting spot?

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  • David Daniel
    replied
    Originally posted by Eylyis View Post
    What a pathetic discussion this is. Some of you have no business calling what you do "hunting". You hide out with a gun in a tree stand with a feeder under it.

    ...."place it high enough so the deer doesn't see you"... What a joke!

    Do you guys shoot animals in cages?
    Not an entirely fair response. First that comes to mind is that many responsible landowners manage their populations by culling appropriate ratios of bucks:does, and this can require efficient harvesting, such as at a feeder. Same goes for hog control and for those who choose to hunt for meat supply. The deer doesn't know or care where or how you shot it, and if you're not hunting the blind to bring in a trophy no one else should either.
    Another point is just who came up with the "rules"? Native Americans used many tricks in hunting, such as baiting, or even herding large numbers of animals off cliffs (and not always using all the resulting carcasses, despite the widespread myth). Look up "buffalo run".
    I agree that it's not much challenge to hunt a blind (though not as simple as you'd think necessarily, especially with a bow). However, there are reasons for hunting other than displaying prowess as a hunter. Lets be honest here - which is more of a natural means of hunting - scattering some corn or using an infrared, cellular-equipped camera, digitally derived and heavily researched cammo clothes, laboratory-processed scents, etc?

    Leave a comment:


  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Twenty to thirty yards away if you are using a bow!

    Leave a comment:


  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Twenty to thirty yards away if you are using a bow!

    Leave a comment:


  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Twenty to thirty yards away if you are using a bow.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eylyis
    replied
    What a pathetic discussion this is. Some of you have no business calling what you do "hunting".
    You just hide out with your gun in a tree stand and wait for a deer to walk up to the feeder under it.

    ...."place it high enough so the deer doesn't see you"... What a joke!

    Do you guys shoot animals in cages?

    Leave a comment:


  • Eylyis
    replied
    What a pathetic discussion this is. Some of you have no business calling what you do "hunting". You hide out with a gun in a tree stand with a feeder under it.

    ...."place it high enough so the deer doesn't see you"... What a joke!

    Do you guys shoot animals in cages?

    Leave a comment:


  • Eylyis
    replied
    What a pathetic discussion this is. Some of you have no business calling what you do "hunting". You hide out with a gun in a tree stand with a feeder under it.

    ...."place it high enough so the deer doesn't see you"... What a joke!

    Do you guys shoot animals in cages?

    Leave a comment:


  • jscottevans
    replied
    As long as "baiting" is legal in your state, the further the better as long as your in "affective" shooting range and you have good optics. If your bow hunting, you should be accurate out to 40 our 50 yards but deer can easily jump the string at 30 +, so 20 is a perfect range. But like Big C said, your better off hunting the trails here. With a rifle ( if legal), say a .30-06 you should be accurate out to 300 but a general safe distance (with a rest from a stand) is 150-200 yards. The reason is you want to eliminate your scent, and the further away you are the weaker your scent will be. Plus you can sneak in and out without spooking the deer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Big C
    replied
    Hunt the trails leading to and from the feeder. Don't put it too close or you cannot get into or out of your stand while deer are feeding.

    Leave a comment:


  • FloridaHunter1226
    replied
    There is no set distance, it all depends on what a comfortable shooting distance for you is. I mean, you need a clear path from you and the feeder so that you can not only see what is going on but make a clean shot. Also, the farther the way the better, that way you do not disturb the animals around the feeder as well as they do not pick up your scent. Also, keeping your distance broadens your hunting area.

    Leave a comment:


  • bear hunter
    replied
    50 yards,.. front and center

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  • CPT BRAD
    replied
    20-30 yards for Bow 100 or 150 for a rifle

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  • Christian Emter
    replied
    COUPLE HUNDRED yards

    Leave a comment:


  • kjflorian
    replied
    Yeah, in MI we are not allowed to bait, plus I was never a big fan of it. Where I am at there are just to many crop fields in during the fall, it's kind of futile. I know people that had property further N. of where I am, where there are fewer crop fields, and they baited when it was permitted. In that situation I could see trying to bring a deer in, because there was nothing up there but woods. I see both sides of that one, just not a fan of hunting over bait.

    Leave a comment:


  • Del in KS
    replied
    Buckhunter is right about feeders and keeping deer around. The big 10 pt in my profile came to a grunt call from a thicket 150 yd from a feeder. I would hunt over a feeder if hunting just for meat. A big buck would not mean much to me if he was shot over bait. Last fall I placed a trailcam over a feeder and got pics of 3 ten pointers and 2 eights in only 2 days. All came in at night. Plenty of doe and fawns came in during daylight. They almost always come in from downwind and with great caution. My state has too many deer in some areas and many doe need to be shot to get numbers down. Feeders help with that. It's not hunting really it's shooting but necessary.

    Leave a comment:

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