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what do you all think of using a 223. for whitetails?

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  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Agreed with Beekeeper answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • NYhunter
    replied
    It will kill'em if you hit them in the right spot.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    You need to ask respondents if they ever actually shot a deer or saw one shot with a .223. Many seem to theorize that .223s are pipsqueeks based on no practial experience and an undefensible theory that a bullet lighter than a pound can't possibly kill. .223's are deadly suckers. Don't kid yourself, they exit, they break bones, they kill on the spot. They don't hurt as much as a .338 Lapua if you drop them on your foot but please don't let anyone shoot you with one. Are heavier cartriges more versatile in more conditions? Yes! Can you use a .223 for deer? In about 80% of actual whitetail hunting conditions, Yes! Like most of our fast cartriges, they are not the best in heavy brush.

    Leave a comment:


  • kyle7735
    replied
    accuracy

    youre main problem will be shredding bullets

    make sure you are using bullets that wont decentagrate with contact with deer

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark w
    replied
    The .223 was designed as a varmint round and not very good for deer. I would advise against it out of respect for the animal. If we hunt them they deserve to be killed quickly and cleanly.

    Leave a comment:


  • prairieghost
    replied
    as others have noted here...simply two words---bullet placement. i've taken antelope with a .22-.250 so an average doe certainly wouldn't be much of an issue.
    to shane-check the numbers between a 25.06, 6 mm, and a .243. you won't find a nickels worth of difference.

    Leave a comment:


  • ishawooa
    replied
    Anything less than .240 is illegal in Wyoming for big game. However I have seen hunters easily kill whitetails in Mississippi using a .223 while being careful to put the shot where it is needed.
    Years ago I witnessed a guy killing a spike bull elk with one 52 gr Hornady from a .22-.250 at about 75 yards. It dropped like it was hit by a .300 Weatherby.

    Leave a comment:


  • shane
    replied
    They used to play the how big of a gun should I use game, now it seems people are playing the how small of a gun can I get away with game.

    I don't like it.

    I don't even like .243 for deer, but I might be willing to try it. .25 and up for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward J. Palumbo
    replied
    With a well placed shot, you can certainly take a whitetail with a .223; however, out of respect for the life of the whitetail I intend to take, I wouldn't use a .22 centerfire for whitetail. I consider the .223 well suited to smaller game, but the rib cage, sternum or shoulder of a whitetail could deflect a 55-60 grain bullet, requiring a quick follow-up shot or permitting a wounded whitetail to escape or suffer a lingering death. A larger caliber (and heavier bullet) would penetrate with better certainty. If an individual wanted a lighter recoil rifle for whitetail, I would avoid the use of the minimum margin of choice in preference of a .24-.25-.26 caliber rifle that would provide more power, greater assurance of a quick kill.

    Leave a comment:


  • willkillsdeer
    replied
    *rested *leagl

    Leave a comment:


  • willkillsdeer
    replied
    i can get a 1 in. group at a hunderd yards reste and a three in. off hand it isn't leagel in my part of my but just a thought

    Leave a comment:


  • hjohn429
    replied
    I think would just shoot it in the head, so it would die quickly. It is not legal in many states, except for Texas.

    Leave a comment:


  • bonnier-admin_2
    replied
    55grain soft point is no problem, I shot Mule Deer as far as 700 yards with my 22-250

    Leave a comment:


  • bonnier-admin_2
    replied
    It can be done, especially with the heavier bullets out there. BUT it is not an effective deer caliber for any of the reasons listed above.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beekeeper
    replied
    It can be done, especially with the heavier bullets out there. BUT it is not an effective deer caliber for any of the reasons listed above.

    Leave a comment:

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