Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Would kind of survival gear should I have in my hunting vehicle?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Would kind of survival gear should I have in my hunting vehicle?

    Would kind of survival gear should I have in my hunting vehicle?

  • #2
    I'd keep a space blanket, and some granola bars, along with some TP, rubbing alcohol, and a empty small coffee can. In case your truck decides not to start you can use these three things to make a heater.(Look in a Dec. 2004-Jan. 2005 Field and Stream to learn how.) Other than this just your usual extra layer and such.

    Comment


    • #3
      Along with everything that Chris Carpenter said, and assuming one has some personal survival gear that they take hunting, I would suggest this:

      For the vehicle, always have chains, water, fuses, a a compact floor jack and small tool box.

      For hunters, first aid kit (check it regularly to restock and keep things fresh), duct tape, tarp, flashlight, rope, string, bungee cords, fire starter, high carb foods and drinking water. We keep these things in a plastic milk crate that we throw in the back of the van with our gear when we head out in the woods.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would also add to the vehicle a Handyman Jack. They can be a dangerous tool if you aren't careful, but they can also do a million things that a bottle or scissor jack can't... There is an excellent product called Quick-Clot out there that is a necessity for LARGE wounds - I'm not talking a little cut. This stuff is more for something like stabbing yourself with a broadhead or an accidental shooting. Check it out, because it is worth having around.

        Comment


        • #5
          a small 2oz bottle of denatured alcohol is perfect for starting a fire, even using wet wood, it will start right up. good dry fire starting tender. lots of water.

          Comment


          • #6
            A Booth Babe! lol Seriously, everything above is good but I'd add extra batteries, tools for basic vehicle maintenence and a gas can if you are in the middle of nowhere.

            Comment


            • #7
              All of the above listed items plus I like to add some extra food, in particular some MRE's from the military. These things are good for years without attention and are high in calories. Just remember if it is in your vehicle you arn't carring it so pile it in.

              Comment


              • #8
                Don't go anywhere with out the "Spot" emergency phone. I won't leave home with it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  In bed utility box:
                  full size shovel, heavy duty hand winch with 20ft single line cable, 4ft high lift jack that also doubles as a winch, 50 ft of logging chains, several commercial tie down straps, 50ft 5/8 rope, tool box with shop grade tools and supplies for every occasion and 5 gallon gas can every once in a while and Poulan
                  18" "Wild Thing" Gas Chainsaw.

                  In the cab:
                  50 watt VHF transceiver full ranges transmit and receive 138-174 MHz with telephone and repeater capability, 2 flashlights, small tool bag, toilet paper, couple of heavy jackets, AAA thru D batteries.

                  Back Pack:
                  iFINDER® Hunt™ C Handheld GPS, “SPOT” (FINDMESPOT.COM) multi function personal handheld satellite messaging tracking and 911 unit, Gerber folding hand saw, Toilet paper , Military compass, Military poncho, Mosquito Head Net, 3-4 bottle water, extra ammo, extra batteries, 2 high output diving lights that can be seen from space, small jar of Vaseline, magnesium fire stick, dental floss, large hand warmers, Kit & Caboodle gun cleaning kit, extra jacket, game calls and other junk

                  ATV:
                  6 bottles of water, extra jacket, extra ammo, 3 military ponchos, tools, 50ft 5/8 rope, military trench shovel, 2 gallons of gas, large hand saw and back pack.

                  Sorry I don’t carry the kitchen sink and don’t plan to be stranded long!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Looking up that Cody Lundin book... thanks

                    ummmm, glad to see someone mentioned toilet paper. A roll that has about 25 sheets left tends to be convenient and tends to stay rolled up. Items I *always* have on a checklist before hunting, in order of importance:

                    *gun
                    *shells
                    *license
                    *hat
                    *gloves
                    *toilet paper!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't forget a good sock cap, boots and insulated coveralls if you decide you can't stick it out anymore and have to walk.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A source of fire, a medical kit, and maybe a blanket. Also, always let someone know where you are going and where you are going to be before ever going out in the woods. Also let them know when you plan on calling them, this way, if you cant/dont call them, they know something is up.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Cell phone is least often listed but the shortest route to recovery if you can get a signal.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Remember the time tested saying: IT'S BETTER TO HAVE IT AND NOT NEED IT, THAN TO NEED IT AND NOT HAVE IT !!!
                            1. Leave a written “PLAN” of your hunt/trip information with friends and family, in the event of an emergency. Provide dates, locations, (hunt units), including departure and arrival. If the "EXPECTED" happens, then someone will be looking for you and they will know where to look.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              2. Clothing / gear for the conditions you are in. Desert region: long sleeve shirt, wide brim hat, plenty water, ice, and ice chest. Winter Conditions: warm clothing (wool, fleece, thinsulate, gore-tex), gloves, blankets, etc.


                              Comment

                              Welcome!

                              Collapse

                              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                              Right Rail 1

                              Collapse

                              Top Active Users

                              Collapse

                              There are no top active users.

                              Right Rail 2

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Right Rail 3

                              Collapse

                              Footer Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X