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Im buying a new bow this summer. I can easily pull 50-60 pounds, but im starting to use the gym and i was wondering if i should

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  • Im buying a new bow this summer. I can easily pull 50-60 pounds, but im starting to use the gym and i was wondering if i should

    Im buying a new bow this summer. I can easily pull 50-60 pounds, but im starting to use the gym and i was wondering if i should try going for 60-70 lbs? Should i just stay at 50-60? The bow im buying is the Black Ice by Diamond if that matters.

  • #2
    Its up to whatever your comfortable with. If you have a friend with a 70lb draw bow see if you like shooting it. If not, go to a archery range and find out.

    p.s.-(Diamonds are good, inexpensive bows

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    • #3
      it's what ever fits u best i shoot a 50-60 and i shot a brown with it so(700 pounds )

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      • #4
        sorry go with a matthews or a martin

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        • #5
          I would go to a pro shop and see if you can comfortably draw and accurately shoot a 70# bow (Diamond Black Ice in this case). I've heard that they are smooth drawing and shooting bows.

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          • #6
            I would suggest finding out what you are comfortable pulling back on the range then drop 5-10 lbs from it. Hunting with a bow and range shooting with a bow are two different animals.

            Diamond are a great bow.

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            • #7
              I am in love with Mathews Bows. That said a 60 lb bow of any brand is all you need to take just about anything. Just use razor sharp broadheads and good arrows. Keep in mind you should be able to draw your bow early when a deer is coming and hold it at full draw until the shot presents itself. Hard to do with a heavy bow.

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              • #8
                I guess some of it depends on what you plan on hunting. From what I know 50-60 pounds is all you need for whitetail. Like others have said the range is different than actually hunting. Try pulling 70 pounds seated in a treestand quietly with a big buck at 20 yards. I wouldn't worry about what other people can pull. Worry about putting a good shot on a nice buck.

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                • #9
                  T are you sure diamonds are inexpensive?

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                  • #10
                    To determine your comfortable pull weight hold your bow direct in front of you with the sight at eye level. From this point you should be able to pull the bow back comfortably without much movement up/down or left/right. If your pointing your bow up to get it back it's not gonna work in the woods.

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                    • #11
                      If you can pull a 70 pound back, then train with a 70 pound and before you know it, you'll be hunting with it and be glad you did!

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                      • #12
                        Shot my first 2 deer with an old Ben Pearson 42 lb recurve and got pass thrus on both. You don't need the heaviest bow you can pull.

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                        • #13
                          If you're easily shooting a 60# bow, why not buy the 60-70 so as you get stronger you can increase the poundage. You don't need 70# but if you're comfortable shooting and holding your draw at that weight, why not?

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                          • #14
                            it is good to challenge yourself but take it easy dont over do it.

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                            • #15
                              If you can pull 60 get the 60-70 for shure.

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