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For a first time bow hunter is a 70lb draw too much? What is the most common 50-60lb?

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  • Sean Kilfeather
    replied
    Been shooting a 75lbs bow for the last two years comfortably and I'm 15 depends on what you can shoot comfortably

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  • rudyglove27
    replied
    I go with 60 lb draw because it's comfortable to me!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Big C
    replied
    it depends on what you can handle. If you are comfortable with 60-70 and can hold at full draw for 30-40 seconds then you can probably go that high. Otherwise stick with 50-60 and make it easier on yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • steve182
    replied
    I think 60# is more than sufficient. That said, the only reason i bought one was because it was mislabled as 70# on ebay. Rather than hassle with returning it i started shooting it. Did the trick on the only buck I shot at with it. I think some people shooting heavier bows may take risky shots. Not good. Most 60# bows can be adjusted up to about 62 or 63#

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  • T
    replied
    Only go with 70 if your comfortable. 60lb is probably the most common in my area.

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  • Golfing Sportsman
    replied
    I think 70 pounds is high for most deer hunting, and there is a huge difference between what you can pull in July in your yard wearing a t-shirt and what you can pull in a stand in December with 4 layers on. Also your bow will be more efficient pulling at its maximum possible draw weight.

    Leave a comment:


  • CPT BRAD
    replied
    It really depends on your AGE and how much you practice. a 20-30 year old can pull a 70 pound bow all day but us older guys usually drop down to 45-55 pounds and find how to get closer. there is no advantage to a higher draw weight. The extra pounds are only incrementally not exponentially, meaning the more you pull you guts out is only for a small gain.

    sorry.

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  • Jim in Mo
    replied
    Just because a bow says 70lb draw, don't let that stop you from buying it, the shop can set it to your likes and the poundage can be upped later.

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  • littledeer_2
    replied
    i don't bow hunt but even i know 70 lbs is too much

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  • Del in KS
    replied
    Clay,

    I noticed the same thing about the 30 yd pin working on steep angle shots.

    I shoot a 62 lb Mathews and have taken 8 deer with it in the last 3 years. Could have taken several more. With rangefinders you don't need a flat shooting bow. Whats more important is silence, accuracy and the ability to hold at full draw a long time without the shakes. You draw when the head is down or behind a tree then wait at full draw for a shot. Works great for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • bonnier-admin_2
    replied
    The more you “”train”” at 70 pounds the better you will be pulling it back and the ability to hit your point of aim. My HCA (High Country Archery) 4 Runner now under the Mathew name is set at 70ibs with a 28” Gold Tip with 3 blade 100 grain Muzzy at 310ish fps. I only use 3 pins 30, 40 & 50 and can accurately judge 60. It’s flat shooting out to 30 yards and the distance between my 30 and 50 yard pin is only about ¾ inch. I also have a Bushnell laser range finder mounted on the bow and I can operate at full draw. For high angle shots, my 30 yard pin is dead on.

    I also found, upping the poundage on a bow may not achieve a faster arrow. You will just have to try it out to find out.

    Leave a comment:


  • peter
    replied
    deeprnds on your age and body. but you can try something less

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  • rezavoirdog
    replied
    If you go with a lighter draw weight (45-60lbs), increase your total arrow weight to between 400-500 grains to keep your kinetic energy high enough for pass-throughs.

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  • buckhunter
    replied
    I pull 63 lbs and blow through everything I shoot at. 60 lbs is more than enough. A lighter weight gives you a longer and more steady hold which can come in handy. The lighter weight also gives you less vibration therefore less noise.

    Goodluck

    Leave a comment:


  • mdhager115
    replied
    These days bows are very advanced, sao you can be fine at 50-60. But go for 70 if your comfortable with it.

    Leave a comment:

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