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Bowhunters....I know I asked a few days ago if you keep your quiver attached to your bow while in your treestand, and some of th

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  • Bowhunters....I know I asked a few days ago if you keep your quiver attached to your bow while in your treestand, and some of th

    Bowhunters....I know I asked a few days ago if you keep your quiver attached to your bow while in your treestand, and some of those answers got me to thinking that I might change to keeping the quiver attached. For the people who do keep their quiver attached, where do you store your bow while in your treestand. The main reason I used to detach my quiver was so my bow was always in my lap with an arrow nocked, dont like to be caught off guard. I guess everyone should feel free to answer as well, when in your treestand, where do you store your bow, and do you always keep an arrow nocked, and do you also always have your release(if you use one) strapped to your wrist?

  • #2
    I keep the quiver on my bow, which is across my lap with the arrow knocked. I use a tab and it is on my finger so that I am ready if and when the opportunity should arrive.

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    • #3
      well it depends. when i go turkey hunting, i sit behind burlap between two trees. and on one of the trees i put a hook, and i hang my bow while i wait without an arrow knocked. my release is hanging on the d loop. in a tree stand, keep it across my lap as beekeeper said, with an arrow knocked.

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      • #4
        I put my bow across my lap ready to go. It has an arrow knockes and my release is locked on the string. Backup arrows are in the attached quiver. Sometimes when you see a deer you have no chance for a movement as extreme as bring a bow off a hanger.

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        • #5
          In my treestand I have a long screw in bow hangar. Just screw it into the tree and hang the bow vertically with an arrow knocked. At the first sign of movement I Stand up, reach for my bow and clip my release on the D-loop.

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          • #6
            I keep my arrow nocked all the time(when I'm in the stand) with the quiver on the bow hanging on a hook.

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            • #7
              I always keep my bow on my lap with an arrow nocked and my release on my wrist. By the way I keep my quiver off all of the time.

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              • #8
                I keep my bow on a bow hook near my grip hand, I've blown it on a few bucks that have put the sneak on me and were past before I could pull it off my lap and twist it into shooting position. Most of the time during peak hours (when I am noticing deer moving or dawn and dusk) I leave it resting on my toe, arrow knocked and release clipped in. Just so that all I have to do is stand up and let it fly.

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                • #9
                  Here are my rules for the treestand. I remain seated while waiting for the deer to show up. When I see a deer I stand up and grab my bow whether it's a shooter or not and stay leaned against the tree to hide my outline. I remain in shooting position until the deer leave. The reason I do this is because if I have deer near it would be hard to stand and grab your bow if a big buck would be following. Otherwise I try to remain seated. I move much less when I'm seated.

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                  • #10
                    Quiver-attached
                    Bow-On hook
                    Arrow-Nocked
                    Release-On

                    To buckhunter: I told you to quit copying me(LOL).

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                    • #11
                      I do the same as matouse3, exactly. Having a whisker-biscuit or other arrow rest that holds the arrow firmly in place helps tremendously when handling your bow w/ arrow nocked.

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                      • #12
                        I have a mounts on my tree stands that hold the bow upright by my left side or between my legs. Arrow is always nocked. Also set the bow in my lap at times. If in my lap the release is attached to the sting. My quiver is usually attached to the tree.

                        Would be great to set up so that the bow grip is at waist level with nothing to get in the way when standing up.

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                        • #13
                          I always keep an arrow nocked, with the bow hanging on a hook, if available or room permits, but usually with the bow across my lap. This will be my first year with a release after having shot fingers for many years but I anticipate having the release on my wrist with a thinner glove than the other hand. Good hunting!

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                          • #14
                            95% of the time when I'm in a tree stand I keep my bow in my lap or my hand,with an arrow nocked. My release is ALWAYS strapped to my wrist.

                            The other 5% of the time I hang the bow with the arrow still nocked,in the direction the deer come from, so I can easily and slowly reach for the bow with my left hand.

                            I'm only in a tree 10% of the time as I mostly stalk. I keep the arrow nocked the whole time I'm in the woods. There is to much movement reaching for an arrow to nock it.I keep my movements to a minimum ... at ALL times.

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                            • #15
                              I do pretty much what buckhunter does. I keep my bow resting across my stand if in my climber or on my lap, arrow knocked, release on.

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